Rumor: HP’s webOS slate will be out in early 2011

HP seems to have hit kind of a rough patch, with both CEO Mark Hurd and Palm Pre designer Peter Skillman departing over the span of a few days. If we’re to believe the folks at Engadget, though, that webOS slate everyone’s been talking about hasn’t been canned yet; in fact, HP has reportedly primed the device for a launch in the first quarter of 2011.

Engadget got the scoop from "several trusted sources," who claim HP Vice President Todd Bradley set the first-quarter launch schedule "during an all-hands employee meeting" on Monday. The site also learned HP’s code name for the slate ("Hurricane"), although we wouldn’t be surprised to see the newly filed PalmPad trademark slapped on the device.

Q1 is sort of a loose time frame, but who knows—maybe we’ll get lucky and catch a glimpse of the PalmPad at the Consumer Electronics Show in January. If that’s the case, HP will probably have some competition. Asus staffers told me a couple of months back that the 12" Eee Pad should be out in time for CES. Asus is also developing a 10", Android-powered device that could launch slightly earlier.

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    • oMa
    • 9 years ago

    I’m really looking forward to this product! webOS with propper hw acceleration of menus (1.5/2.0) is going to be a dream!!!

    • blastdoor
    • 9 years ago

    it will be very interesting to see how the PalmPad (or whatever) fares after Hurd’s exit. Was this a strategy that the rest of the company was really behind? Or will the loss of Hurd reveal a schism between Windows advocates (and Android advocates) in HP and the more visionary people who supported the Palm acquisition?

    The challenge here for HP with Palm is that they are taking sole responsibility for an entire *platform*, not just a product. Has HP ever tried to do that with a mass-market product before? I know they had their high-end niche Unix platform, but (a) that’s not the same thing and (b) they clearly weren’t very committed to it, so that experience doesn’t bode well.

    Taking responsibility for an entire platform is a major commitment. Only Microsoft/Intel and Apple have shown that they’re really up to it. I think the jury is still out on Google with Android… they’re doing well in terms of the number of Android devices, but we have yet to see if they can actually make money off of Android or whether they are really prepared to do the heavy lifting of moving a platform forward over the long run (my guess is they’re not, but we’ll see).

    My guess is that HP really isn’t up to the challenge either, and that Palm will go the way of the Amiga.

      • ColdMist
      • 9 years ago

      Would all of their (now defunct?) Itanium and/or Solaris lines qualify as taking responsibility for the entire platform?

        • blastdoor
        • 9 years ago

        That’s the “high end unix niche” that I was referring to (and which they helped drive into the ground). Definitely not mainstream.

        • destroy.all.monsters
        • 9 years ago

        Wan’t it HP-UX? They also own Compaq’s version of Unix that had been optimized for Alpha.

        The way they killed all those product lines doesn’t exactly inspire confidence,nor does their release of Hurd or the brain drain out of Palm.

    • adisor19
    • 9 years ago

    There we go : another important iPad competitor is delayed once again. Goes to show that until next year, the iPad will reign supreme and by the time the competition actually manages to release something, Apple will refresh the iPad with cool new features and it’s once again back to the design board for the competition.

    Adi

      • eitje
      • 9 years ago

      Here we may reign secure, and in my choice
      to reign is worth ambition though in Hell:
      Better to reign in niche, than serve in high-market-share.

        • jdaven
        • 9 years ago

        Please provide evidence that the Apple tablet has a niche market share and the competition has the high market share. Oh wait there is no competition yet and Apple has 100% market share and a 4 million unit head start so far.

        Sorry Mr. Poet, but by the time the competition has anything viable, Apple will have a refresh and have sold almost 12 million units to the competitions zero. Remember both the iPod and iPhone debuted in the $500 range, and quickly became the dominate hardware in their respective markets while offering a diverse range of models covering many price points down to $100 and less.

        The iPad caught everyone off guard yet again. Analysts predict 10 million + units per year which is almost a quarter of the entire PC market annually.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 9 years ago

          How do you figure 10 million is one quarter of 350+ million? (‘1 million PCs shipped per day.’) Must be some type of fancy RDF math 😉

            • no51
            • 9 years ago

            jdaven is like if adisor and krogoth (or meadows?) had a baby.

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 9 years ago

            This post is win. Thanks for the laugh.

            • jdaven
            • 9 years ago

            Oops. I guess I was confusing just US shipments. Sorry about that.

        • FireGryphon
        • 9 years ago

        +1 Milton points for you

      • blastdoor
      • 9 years ago

      I wonder if the delay in competition is an indicator that other firms really were fooled into thinking that Apple was going to sell a $1k device and then had to go scrambling back to the drawing board.

        • NeelyCam
        • 9 years ago

        That was the argument back then when iPad was released at $500 or so.

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