Site posts purported Sandy Bridge launch lineup

Are the names and specs of Intel’s first Sandy Bridge CPUs finally out in the open? Hard to say for sure at this point, but German site Computerbase has definitely posted a couple of lists with details about both desktop and mobile Sandy Bridge parts—and the information appears to corroborate previous reports.

Source: Computerbase.

According to the list above, the jump to Sandy Bridge will get us desktop quad-core parts with power envelopes in the 45-95W range. The list also suggests that Intel will continue to slap the Core i5 name on both dual- and quad-core processors with the Sandy Bridge generation. Too bad. With the exception of the Core i5-2390T, the purported next-gen naming scheme almost makes sense, with the Core i5 label applying chiefly to four-core, four-thread parts with Turbo Boost.

Computerbase also has details about six Sandy Bridge mobile parts, which will apparently have two to four cores and TDP ratings between 35W and 55W. Nothing particularly new under the sun there, although the next-gen architecture alone will probably yield some performance gains.

Comments closed
    • FuturePastNow
    • 9 years ago

    The i5-2390T is going to be a dream processor for the silent computing and HTPC crowds.

    • srg86
    • 9 years ago

    I’ve been wanting to upgrade for a long time now, but more important personal and money things have cropped up. Looking at this it appears I will eventually be going:

    Athlon64 X2 4200+ -> Corei7-2600S

    Should be a nice upgrade, and yes those cores and threads will defininatly help! (compile 4 or even 8 source files at a time!!).

    srg

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      That sounds really cool. 🙂 Put in an SSD too, and it’ll be like night and day.

    • Krogoth
    • 9 years ago

    Gentlemen, Sandy Bridge is just a Lynnfield replacement. It isn’t going to be that much faster and AVX isn’t going to matter much for a while. This is nothing like S939/S754 transition.

    The only thing you might miss is the integrated GPU.

    If you are already on Socket 1156, you are quite fine for some time yet. There aren’t that many if any mainstream applications that demand more than what Clarkdale/Lynnfield can mustered.

    Sandy Bridge is really meant for OEM market as it is Intel’s first serious attempt at a SOAC solution. It is their answer to AMD’s Fusion.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 9 years ago

      Yes, an answer to a question that AMD itself won’t have answered when SB is released 😉 Intel is such a manufacturing beast…

        • NeelyCam
        • 9 years ago

        Intel is a manufacturing beast right now, but give it 5-6 years, and Samsung might surpass them.

        I’m a little concerned about what’s happening to american semiconductor manufacturing (after reading that Andy Grove article on manufacturing in general in BusinessWeek). GF/TSMC/Samsung are all controlled by foreign entities… Intel is the last american one standing. (And no, I don’t count IBM/TI/smaller ones).

          • Farting Bob
          • 9 years ago

          Why dont you count IBM / TI etc? They are US based, and pretty damn big.
          Still, unless samsung is planning on making x86 chips for the desktop i dont see an issue.

      • Spotpuff
      • 9 years ago

      I feel better about my i5-750 now.

      • JumpingJack
      • 9 years ago

      SB will fit into the Lynnfield market to start, but it is not simpy a shrink of Lynnfield. This is the new arch revision not just a shrink, it went like this:

      Conroe was new, penryn was the shrink.
      Nehalem was new, westmere was the shrink.
      Sandy Brige will be new, Ivy Bridge will be the shrink.

    • MrDigi
    • 9 years ago

    Looks like OCing is going to be limited to the high price points if K parts are required. I imagine the 2500 will be priced like todays 750 and the 2600 like the 860, so K parts add another $30-50. I don’t mind the K premium but I’ll miss getting entry level parts to clock like extreme parts.

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      Too bad. Intel wants your money.

        • MrDigi
        • 9 years ago

        These should fall in the $100-$300 range, which is great for a new architecture launch. Given that they use a new socket means Intel doesn’t have to worry about directly cannibalizing existing products, so pricing can overlap.

        The 2400 should fall in where the 650 was priced, that should make it the best value in this lineup.

          • NeelyCam
          • 9 years ago

          Wait, what? Have the prices been leaked already?
          $300 for i7-2600?? I may have to build a new rig…

    • Thresher
    • 9 years ago

    I just upgraded to socket 1156. DAMMIT.

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      Just pry off one pin and you’ll be ok

        • Krogoth
        • 9 years ago

        They are keyed differently and be physically incompatible.

        Forcing an insertion will likely cause a nasty short = death of CPU and/or motherboard.

          • NeelyCam
          • 9 years ago

          Really?

    • HurgyMcGurgyGurg
    • 9 years ago

    What, no hex cores? I guess with the architecture integration and on core GPU that’s where the space is going.

    Actually, are any of the Sandy Bridge parts not going to have GPUs?

    I guess we have to wait for the die shrink to bring a whole line-up of hex cores?

      • UberGerbil
      • 9 years ago

      Just buy Xeon — it serves the only markets that matter for 6+ cores per socket.

      • MrDigi
      • 9 years ago

      Hex cores will need extra memory channel so will fall into 1366 socket family, and so will not have the GPU. Maybe they will go right to octal cores.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      There are octal cores with 20MB of L3 cache, just not in the “mainstream” lines.

      • Krogoth
      • 9 years ago

      Because, Sandy Bridge was build as a mainstream OEM product in mind.

      Mainstream market doesn’t need more than four cores. Making a hex-core + IMC + southbridge = engineering nightmare with 32nm process.

      If you need more CPU power, the odds are that you are in the workstation/server arena. LGA1366 is a far more adequate platform.

        • HurgyMcGurgyGurg
        • 9 years ago

        Thanks guys. I haven’t payed attention to the Intel market much since Core 2.

    • Buzzard44
    • 9 years ago

    What happened to the i7-1000 series? For the love of humanity, can’t anyone make logical model numbers?!

      • MrDigi
      • 9 years ago

      Maybe the 1000 series is reserved for Pentium branded SandyBridge CPUs. The i3,i5 and i7 is for the average consumer (good, better, best), the number after is the real model number, and the letter is target application (mobile, SFF, tuner/OCer).

    • bthylafh
    • 9 years ago

    This is the die-shrink for the Core i series, right?

      • Game_boy
      • 9 years ago

      No, that was Westmere. This is a new architecture, still 32nm. Preliminary benchmarks indicate about a 20% IPC boost.

      • jdaven
      • 9 years ago

      No. The die shrink was 45 (Nehalem) to 32 nm (Westmere). These are Sandy Bridges (32 nm) and use a whole new architecture.

      Although, other than the model names, you couldn’t tell the difference in specs between Westmere and Sandy Bridge. I hope Intel has some serious architectural improvements up its sleeve (which it does, I’m just being bitchy).

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      Yes and no. It’s a “new” architecture, but with this first version, most of the changes are just merging features of the various iterations of Nehalem together, plus a new GPU that’s fully integrated into the CPU die.

      Aside from the GPU, it will either be like a 32nm Lynnfield/Clarksfield, or Clarkdale/Arrandale with a fully integrated northbridge. You won’t have to pick and choose between lower power and integrated graphics or reduced memory and PCIe latency anymore.

      The laptop platform is also supposed to have Intel’s wi-fi video streaming as a standard feature.

      The high end X58/Bloomfield/Gulftown replacement that comes later on will have more cores and a boat load of L3 cache, but that’s a ways off.

        • UberGerbil
        • 9 years ago

        You forgot to mention AVX. Even in its stunted first iteration in Sandy Bridge, that’s a major software-visible µarch difference (though, being software-visible, you’ll need new software to take advantage of it).

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 9 years ago

          I reworded my original post and accidentally removed a part saying something along the lines that those are the things you’d be most likely to notice.

          I don’t think I’m going to be noticing AVX doing anything for me.

    • anotherengineer
    • 9 years ago

    My next upgrade will be an ssd, I don’t even make 2 cores work hard anymore. I hope the 120GB sandforce drives make it to $250 for boxing day / new years sales.

    • 5150
    • 9 years ago

    55W in a notebook!? That’s even a bit high for a desktop replacement methinks.

      • Thorburn
      • 9 years ago

      i7-920XM and i7-940XM are both 55W parts already. Thanks to the low idle of Clarkfield and the lower power consumption of the PM55 chipset that’s still a saving compared to say the QX9300 at 45W with the PM45 chipset thanks to greater integration.

      It may be 55W, but you are squeezing a CPU, northbridge and graphics core into that power envelope, so at a system level the power consumption is likely to decrease.

      • Duck
      • 9 years ago

      The latest nvidia flagship mobile graphics card has a 100W TDP. Even the desktop 5770 has been measured to use 75W MAX.

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