Deal of the week: Blu-ray bonanza

For a good, long while after the Blu-ray format debuted, recording discs was an expensive endeavor, with retailers charging several hundred bucks for burners and several dollars for each disc. Today’s deal just goes to show how far we’ve come.

Newegg currently sells a 10X LG Blu-ray burner for a tantalizing $109.99 with free shipping. A 10-pack of 4X, 25GB Optical Quantum discs is also available for $9.99 before shipping, getting you each recordable disc for about a dollar.

These aren’t bottom-of-the-bargain-bin deals, either. The LG drive admittedly ships bare with no box, but Newegg customers have showered it in positive reviews. (60% of the 177 user reviews award it five stars.) The drive burns BD-Rs at 10X and recordable DVDs at 16X; also, until September 30, Newegg ships it with a free copy of CyberLink’s PowerDVD 9 and one free 25GB Verbatim disc. As for the Optical Quantum discs, those have an even greater proportion of five-star reviews than the burner (74%).

At those prices, I’d be tempted to seriously reconsider my use of USB thumb drives for backups—if I didn’t live north of the border, that is. Really, with 8.5GB DVDs costing only a little less than a buck a disc and 32GB USB 2.0 thumb drives still priced over $50, batches of $1.20-a-pop (after shipping) 25GB discs look mighty tempting.

Comments closed
    • Buzzard44
    • 10 years ago

    About 4 or 5 years ago I decided to backup and archive all my data on DVDs. Unbeknownst to me, the whole spindle of DVDs I was using all had scratches in the same area of the disc. A few years later, when I go to put all the media onto a hard drive, I discover that on all my discs containing images and movies, at least one or two of each images/movies were corrupted beyond recovery. Given that most of my games were multi-disc (DVDs hadn’t taken over games yet), all my games were useless, because one of the three or five discs was unusable.

    Long story short, screw optical storage for backups.

      • supercromp
      • 10 years ago

      VERIFY VERIFY VERIFY

    • indeego
    • 10 years ago

    I haven’t burned a single BR disk, period, since I got it. It’s all HDD and USB keys, for the most part. Few others have Blu ray readers, so even distributing BR disks isn’t realistic.

    Save your money for HDD’s and flash disksg{<.<}g

    • A_Pickle
    • 10 years ago

    What? Optical media still exists? What a shame.

    • Weckl
    • 10 years ago

    I think is much better to store data on disks because if your 1 tb hard disk fails the drama can achieve enormous proportions. I prefer to lose 8,5 gb of data than 500 gb all of a sudden. Furthermore if you record in disks information will last longer if the disk is of good quality.

      • Asbestos
      • 10 years ago

      I will never understand the “smaller storage format is better for data preservation” mentality. Why do people think like this? You might as well still be using floppy disks so you will never lose more than 1.44 MB at a time. Enjoy copying all your data onto 1,388,889 floppies while I use a single 2TB hard drive. Though, you might lose a few years.

        • Weckl
        • 10 years ago

        But a hard disk can fail at any moment after some years, some cheap brands even earlier and if it fails bye bye to almost 50 % of the data. On the other hand recording in DVDs or blurays of good quality (Verbatim, TDK…) the data can last longer than we do ๐Ÿ™‚ Correct me if I’m wrong but I think DVD stored data can last more than decades. There are disks that have black coated paint that can last even more.

          • Asbestos
          • 10 years ago

          Longevity of different media types is another issue completely. Hard drives are very reliable and last a long time if not in continual use. Quality optical discs are believed to last a long time too if stored properly. Any format can fail. That’s why we make backups. Nobody really knows which will last longer. But I don’t think most of us are backing up data and placing the media in a sealed vault untouched for decades. I don’t need my backups to last for more than a few years because I’m always making new backups.

            • potatochobit
            • 10 years ago

            I know for a FACT that the imation CD-Rs I made in the 90s have started to crumble even though Ive not really done anything to them other then leave them in a pile

    • Damage
    • 10 years ago

    This is DOTW since I got mine yesterday and it seems to work well. ๐Ÿ™‚ The drive itself is very quiet in operation and seems to be a quality device.

    The software, however, isn’t that great. The CyberLink Power2Go 6.1/”LG Burner” utility crashes for me on startup. I can find people with the same problem in CyberLink’s forums, but no fix. Downloaded a potential patch for Win7 compatibility, but it only wants to work with a different model of drive. And of course, CyberLink would like to sell me an upgrade to version 7!

    The drive works fine with CDBurnerXP, with the same media listed above, although it tops out at 2X speed.

    I just installed Ashampoo Burning Studio 6 Free, and it seems to work faster, including offering a burn speeds up to 8X–though the media tops out at 4X, and my first burn at 4X produced speeds of “1.8X” when all was said and done. Trying 8X now, though, and it seems to be going faster. We’ll see if it verifies correctly.

    Definitely install the LG firmware update software, though, even if you skip Power2Go.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 10 years ago

      What about ImgBurn? It’s a free program, and it’s great. Although, I’ve only used it for CDs and DVDs.

      • dashbarron
      • 10 years ago

      I usually skip the ‘freeware’ that comes with drives like this, but I never think to update the firmware after I install it. I happy if its working, and it usually isn’t worth my benefit to update the firmware, unless my drive will start popping out warm cookies everytime I open the tray.

      Also, Image Burn is cool, but it doesn’t do the more labor intensive burns.

    • kvndoom
    • 10 years ago

    I wouldn’t even bother listing that PowerDVD as a selling point. I can almost assure you it’s either trialware, feature-limited (like only outputting 2-channel sound), or forces you to install adware.

    I say that because every “free” software DVD player I’ve ever gotten with a DVD drive has fallen into one of those categories.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 10 years ago

    Oh, and Cryil there are a couple of ways around the border. There’s a UPS store just on the other side of the border from me (~1 hour away). Just have your order shipped there to one of the boxes.

    Or you could ship stuff to Scott (non-time sensitive time) and pick it up when you see him next. Or ship it to Scott, he ships it out to you and just deducts the shipping cost from your pay check. Of course, this is all assuming Scott is willing to turn into a postal middle man!

    • Sargent Duck
    • 10 years ago

    I went to newegg.com to find out how much hard drive space you could get for $120 (Blu-ray + 10 pack of disks).

    Came across this deal: WD Green 1.5TB for $89.99 with promo code.
    ยง[<http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136513<]ยง Dang.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 10 years ago

      Exactly. The days of optical media backup are quickly fading. The only huge advantage they have is ease of portability but with BRs you may not find lots of machines that will read them. Even though USB 2.0 is piss slow for mass data movement it’s, well, b[

      • ew
      • 10 years ago

      Online backups FTW!

      • sreams
      • 10 years ago

      To be fair… the Blu-ray drive itself is a one-time investment. After that, it’s about $40/tb.

        • Asbestos
        • 10 years ago

        That’s 40 discs per TB. No way am I swapping discs 80 times for the equivalent storage of a 2TB hard drive.

    • Skrying
    • 10 years ago

    I can’t see any reason a person would use a Blu-Ray disk and burner over a hard drive for back ups. It just doesn’t make any sense to me. You’d tear through those discs in absolutely no time if you’re responsible with your data. Hell, I back up every night thanks to automated software solutions. You can’t do that with discs. If you’re trusting discs you’re either going to have severally out dated data on those discs or your costs will quickly be through the roof.

      • Voldenuit
      • 10 years ago

      Same here. DVD-Rs were the only real backup choice 5-10 years ago, but today, HDD price/GB is much more attractive, as well as HDD backups being a more robust, compact, faster and (with an external dock and hot-plugging) convenient solution.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 10 years ago

      Well it depends what you’re backing up. You obviously wouldn’t use this for documents you are changing on a regular basis.

      On the other hand, video or music files that are not going to change don’t need to be backed up nightly.

    • wibeasley
    • 10 years ago

    What is the expected lifetime of aBlu-ray disk …before the data start to deteriorate?

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      I’ve read 50 years, but that’s Blu Ray salesman talk, and it obviously hasn’t been 50 years to see that through yet.

    • KikassAssassin
    • 10 years ago

    I have an external hard drive for doing backups, so I don’t really need a Blu-Ray burner for backup purposes.

    • ColdMist
    • 10 years ago

    I’ve been waiting for the $100 burner/$1 disk prices to jump into it. The prices hit a plateau at around $150 for a while. It’s good to see them dropping again.

    I have way too much data to put on DVDs, but even RAID, offline HD, or flash storage just doesn’t beat hard physical media, especially for 10+ years of archives, when you realize some file got deleted a year ago, and it isn’t on the RAID backup any more.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 10 years ago

      So what’s your secret for getting optical media to archive data for 10+ years? I’ve used high quality media in general and have never had 100% luck with backups that have simlpy been in storage, out of light, in reasonable temperatures etc.

        • ColdMist
        • 10 years ago

        In the 90’s, I bought 2 200-disk boxes of Kodak Gold archival quality CD-R disks that still work 100% today. Once I went to DVDs, I only get DVD+R (extra CRC data over -R) from Tiyo Yuden, which was just bought/renamed to something else recently.

        I haven’t had a disk (initial coasters excluded, which have been very rare) go bad over time, for the last 20 years.

        I live in the West, dry heat, not much humidity, etc, and store them all in 100-disk binders that are usually zipped closed and lay flat, not vertical.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 10 years ago

          If they work, great, and it certainly made sense in that timeframe. I just don’t see the benefit any more since the perp recording storage explosion and HDDs going for $.05-.06/GB on ‘deals.’ BR makes even less sense than DVDs because of the lower install base and worse $/GB.

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