Leaked slide compares 6700-series, 5800-series Radeons

Okay, so we already saw a leaked slide with some details about those AMD Barts GPUs earlier this month. A new slide posted earlier today by PCinlife reveals quite a bit more details, however—and compares key specs against today’s 5700- and 5800-series Radeons.

First of all, this new document more or less confirms that Barts Pro and XT will be branded the Radeon HD 6750 and 6770. The comparison against the Radeon HD 5850 and 5870 is pretty interesting, though. From what I can see, the 6770 will have a higher fill rate, more memory bandwidth, and greater floating-point performance than the 5850. Talk about a quick mid-range card.

The 6750, meanwhile, will purportedly have the same memory bandwidth and pixel fill rate as the 5850, but with a lower texel fill rate and slower floating-point performance. No matter how you look at it, though, that card promises to be well ahead of the 5770—you know, provided this is a genuine AMD slide and not something put together by a homeless man high on cough syrup. Now all we need is some pricing information. (Thanks to TR reader Tyler for the link.)

Comments closed
    • stuckne1
    • 9 years ago

    Well, I’m excited…new technology is always interesting.

    • capricorn
    • 9 years ago

    Check this out for the power draw of the 6770 series from Chiphell.
    The slide shows that the maximum board power of 6750 : 114W, 6770 : 146W.
    If the rumor that came from the same site is indeed true, where 6750 is beating GTX460 and 6770 is beating 5850, 6700/Barts will be an much more efficient chip compare to the 5000 series, let alone the GF104.

    _[<http://www.chiphell.com/data/attachment/forum/201009/27/100127roko70599pc7p45i.jpg<]_

    • danny e.
    • 9 years ago

    apple sucks.

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 years ago

      DAMN YOU TROLL!!

    • Vaughn
    • 9 years ago

    While I agree with your post, just because they aren’t putting the price tags on it doesn’t mean they can’t do something about it.

    They should implement some kind of system that anyone selling above MSRP should be blacklisted.

    They have the power to do something these are their products!

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      Lol something tells me that blacklisting Newegg isn’t good for business. Why do anything to limit prices when the handful of people complaining about a few dollars are eclipsed by swathes of people willing to pay it? The cheapest retailers have very slim profit margins. They’re entitled to their cut. In Soviet free market, communist is you! :p

      • Game_boy
      • 9 years ago

      I thought price fixing was illegal. The doctrine of first sale usually means that you have control over the pricing and terms until you sell the product, then you don’t.

        • cygnus1
        • 9 years ago

        MSRP – Manufacturer’s *[

        • d0g_p00p
        • 9 years ago

        They are not price fixing though. The MSRP means just that “Manufacture Suggested Retail Price” If there is high demands then the retailer can price the product to whatever they think consumers will pay. That is not price fixing, that is supply and demand. Just like when the product is doing horrible and the price is way below the MSRP.

        I agree though. A product MSRP should be what that product sells at PERIOD. Not higher and not lower.

          • khands
          • 9 years ago

          That kind of defeats the purpose of multiple manufacturers though.

      • YeuEmMaiMai
      • 9 years ago

      OMG when are you tools going to understand supply and demand?

    • can-a-tuna
    • 9 years ago

    l[

    • henfactor
    • 9 years ago

    I wouldn’t be so down on what Nvidia’s situation is ATM. They have a new architecture they’re just beginning to refine, while this is arguably the third iteration of AMD’s tech.

    Remember, they’ve been against the wall before, and it takes just one or two killer cards change the whole market. Personally, I’m excited for this next round (Not calling any winners here, though).

      • Voldenuit
      • 9 years ago

      6xxx is a new architecture for AMD. The move to 4 complex SIMD units instead of the old 1+5 layout is their biggest change since the R600.

      nvidia gambled on coming out with a more radical architecture early, but ended up only launching a few months before the 6000 series.

      Failure of Fermi to execute aside, I can’t argue with the fact that the 460 and 470 cards are simply better value than the current crop of Radeons. Is this the fault of AMD, its AIBs, or just the market not embracing nvidia? When ATI came out with the RV770, nvidia chopped $200 off its prices overnight, and I’m frankly surprised AMD didn’t do the same when the 470 and 460 came out.

        • douglar
        • 9 years ago

        If AMD had over produced the 58xx series chips, I imagine we would see huge price cuts as they tried to clear the channel. But maybe AMD didn’t have to slash the price on the 58xx series chips because the chip production was moving to “pre-order only” by the time the 460 price cuts hit the market.

        Looks like Nvidia is intent on grabbing back as much market share as possible before the 6xxx series puts it back in the too hot / under performing gulag.

      • flip-mode
      • 9 years ago

      Correct (mostly, at least, since I think that counting iterations is a fool’s errand). Don’t count out Nvidia if the company is still alive, and Nvidia is still very much alive.

      So far, Nvidia’s been holding some in reserve – all of the 4xx series products have come to market with portions of the chip disabled. I think this was only a necessity with GF100. My guess is that with GF104 and GF106 things were disabled by choice rather than necessity. I know some believe that yields were more likely the issue, but I’m not convinced that it is not instead a devious plan to have an instant response to anything upcoming that AMD launches.

    • ultima_trev
    • 9 years ago

    #11, Wow, someone is really jaded.

    This article has nothing to do with CPUs, so mentioning Bulldozer, Intel or Sandy Bridge was off point.

    Even AMD fanboys tend to recognize AMD’s HD5700 / HD5800 series was craptacular on average and thanks to GTX 460 in addition to GTX 470’s insane price drops, nVidia’s higher end offerings are currently the better buy opposed to HD 5800 series.

    However, assuming the leaks are true, HD6000 will probably give AMD the advantage it needs over nVidia.

      • khands
      • 9 years ago

      The 5700’s were underwhelming, the 5800s were fantastic at the time of launch, they’re just overpriced now.

      • poulpy
      • 9 years ago

      q[

      • Voldenuit
      • 9 years ago

      The only thing wrong with the 58xx series was the pricing. Especially how it went up instead of down with time. A fault of AMD and OEMs raping customers, but not the fault of the architecture.

        • Sargent Duck
        • 9 years ago

        Economics 101 is knocking at your door…

          • Voldenuit
          • 9 years ago

          I countered Economics 101 with ‘Not Being an Idiot Consumer 306’ and simply didn’t buy. Bet AMD *[

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 9 years ago

            Oh great sage, please lend thy wisdom to the masses of “idiots” who hath found Radeon 5800s to be worth the extra pence and show them the error in their personal judgment!

            But seriously…wow. And for the record, AMD and OEMs aren’t the ones calling the price tag slapped on at the store shelves, nor did they have much of anything to do with the situation that led to that.

            • Voldenuit
            • 9 years ago

            My “not being an idiot” does not automatically mean that anyone who disagrees with me is an idiot (difficult concept for “the internets”, I know).

            And the pricing for the 58xx series was inflated precisely because of the market conditions – there was no competitor. There is no question that price gouging was going on – whether at the manufacturer, AIB and/or retailer level.

            For some people, paying the inflated price was “worth it” to them. For others, not. Why should I suspend my sense of value for what is set (artificially in many cases) by the market? I’m exercising my rights as a consumer not to pay if I think the price is ripping me off.

            I do miss having the greaster power efficiency of the 58xx over my 4870, but there hasn’t been a game I haven’t been able to play on it maxed out except Metro 2033. To me, that’s not $300 well spent.

    • spigzone
    • 9 years ago

    So … 6850 =~ GTX480 & 6870 =~ 5890?

    Nvidia is screwed.

    I’m still waiting to buy 5850 performance < $200. Shouldn’t be long now.

    Yay.

      • mcnabney
      • 9 years ago

      Ahhhhh they are talking about 6750 and 6770, not 68XX models.

      So yes, I would anticipate the 67XX cards to come in at sub-$200 prices and deliver 5850-like performance at lower power and price. I don’t know what AMD has cooked-up at the high end.

        • spigzone
        • 9 years ago

        I was guesstimating that if the 6770 is roughly comparable to the 5870, stands to reason the 6850 is going to be in 480 territory and the 6870 in the 5890 territory.

    • tejas84
    • 9 years ago

    puts on tinfoil hat…

    Here they come! I predict the thread will progress like this..

    AMD can do no wrong and NVIDIA are satan incarnate… AMD will take over the world and Intel with Bulldozer and AMD GPU’s will rule the discrete market and AMD drivers teh pwnxorz… The future according to this thread is for AMD to be the only PC company on earth…

    two words for all of you

    Sandy Bridge.

      • spigzone
      • 9 years ago

      FInally, a voice of sanity.

        • rxc6
        • 9 years ago

        So says the other insane person….

          • spigzone
          • 9 years ago

          ptui … *ping* …

      • Jigar
      • 9 years ago

      Sandy Bridge does high end graphics ? WOW, you got brain.

      • flip-mode
      • 9 years ago

      Out of curiosity, where does you hate come from? One thing is for sure – tejas84 is guaranteed to troll every AMD post.

        • Jigar
        • 9 years ago

        He is just a kid looking for attention. I feel sorry for him.

        • can-a-tuna
        • 9 years ago

        He’s reincarnation of PRIME1

    • flip-mode
    • 9 years ago

    The hardware is looking very solid. At this point pricing is the big question. Hopefully at least one of these cards is aimed at the $200 target. If both are priced above $200 then that will be mildly disappointing, but at the same time will be something of a salve to ease the upgrade itch. On the other hand, if the 460 prices drop in response… the salve will probably be ineffectual.

      • sigher
      • 9 years ago

      I don’t expect them to be below $300+, although logic dictates that in reality AMD seems into keeping prices as high as possible.
      But maybe they are better able to actually produce these chips and they will go more relaxed and things will be different, I await evidence I can see with my own eyes though and don’t have an expectation they will.

    • ultima_trev
    • 9 years ago

    #8, I imagine it will be some time until TMSC’s 28nm fab comes full swing, so nVidia’s kinda SOL until then.

      • sigher
      • 9 years ago

      I really don’t see why people rather repeat slogans than observe reality, nvidia makes cards that run good and cost less, the only issue being the power requirement, but when you look at the actual market you see that nvidia is doing well and the preferred choice.
      And seeing how popular it is amongst those building rigs and buying higher end graphics cards to anyway also buy PSU’s that are way overpowered I think even the powerdraw isn’t an issue in most cases, although that’s guessing on my part.
      There’s a difference between how you want it to be, and how people with some emotional or financial interest scream it to be and how the sales actually go.

    • Jigar
    • 9 years ago

    If the midrange cards are this fast, Nvidia needs to bring Kepler soon, ATI is in full swing here.

      • mcnabney
      • 9 years ago

      Remember, this is just ‘Southern Islands’. AMD is saving Northern Islands for the die shrink. Nvidia snuck a little ahead in the summer (only because AMD didn’t bother to drop prices back down to MSRP) for price performance, but it looks like going into the Holidays AMD will be pounding Nvidia with 6XXX. Hopefully the prices will be good. The PC gaming community has not been helped by Nvidia’s failure to compete.

        • Voldenuit
        • 9 years ago

        It turns out that the whole ‘Southern Islands’/’Northern Islands’ issue was a misconception.

        Without 28nm, AMD couldn’t fit as many transistors as they wanted, but contrary to the early rumors, the 6xxx series uses their new architecture and not a warmed over Cypress.

        • sreams
        • 9 years ago

        Amd doesn’t ever “set” prices above MSRP. AMD only sets MSRP, and the card manufacturers and distributors set pricing from there.

    • ultima_trev
    • 9 years ago

    My fanboy gauges are are overloading! If AMD can deliver on that for their midrange, I can only imagine what the Cayman SKUs will bring!

    HD 57xx was very lackluster, but if this Bart XT truly delivers better texel/shader/memory throughput than HD5850 with even better pixel pushing than HD5870, and rumors are true about the more efficient shaders, if priced right, it will kill any chance of nVidia competing in the mid range market, even with a fully enabled GF104.

    I was was originally figuring Cayman XT at most would trade blows with GTX 480, but seeing these rather impressive specs for their mid range cards and rumors regarding higher shader ICP, I’m now speculating it will outright dominate and possibly even make the upcoming GF110 look weak in comparison.

      • can-a-tuna
      • 9 years ago

      If HD 57xx was “very lackluster” then what was GTS 450 then?

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 9 years ago

        That’s what I’ve been sitting here wondering since this morning. If these cards are so “lackluster,” while occupying some of the most attractive price points, they should be an easy target.

        And yet, since they came out a year ago, they have been left more or less unmatched by Nvidia. All the while, the workers at TSMC have likely been shoveling the things out to keep up with the demand for sub-$150 cards that handle 1920×1200.

        As usual, “enthusiasts” spend too much time ogling the labels at the tops of benchmark charts and not enough time considering what they numbers are actually saying.

          • flip-mode
          • 9 years ago

          The numbers tell me that the 5770 has always been lackluster – just little bit faster than a 4870 – except sometimes when the 4870 beats it – but priced a lot higher. The issue with the 5770 has always been price. It should have topped out at $150 at launch and fallen from there. When it launched you could get 4870 1GB for $125.

            • poulpy
            • 9 years ago

            Maybe it’s semantics but it still doesn’t make it lacklustre in my book, merely overpriced.
            I mean you got the outgoing high-end performance in the new mid-range card, dropping about 50/80W (idle/load), and gaining new bits like DX11 or Eyefinity.
            Not the best bang for your bucks in the new range surely but I reserve my hate mail to nVidia for that 🙂

            • flip-mode
            • 9 years ago

            Maybe not semantics, maybe just difference of opinion:

            Lackluster: marginally faster than 4870

            Overpriced: cost a fair bit more than 4870

            In my mind it was both (a) lackluster, and (b) overpriced. But that’s just my opinion.

            • Stargazer
            • 9 years ago

            It also depends on what you’re looking for. If you purely want good a good performance/cost ratio, then it was certainly lackluster.

            However, I specifically got my 5770 because of the lower power usage (while still giving decent performance), and I’m *very* happy with how that’s been working out. I’ve been able to force the fan to keep spinning at the idle fan speed even when the card is “fully” loaded, and haven’t seen any instabilities (or excessive temperatures).

            • swaaye
            • 9 years ago

            If you consider how some previous midrange releases have compared to their top-end predecessors, and their pricing, I don’t really see anything disappointing about 5770. Consider the GeForce 8600 GTS at $200+ for a moment, or the X1600 XT. Even the Radeon 3870 was $250 and couldn’t completely beat its predecessor.

            5770 launched at $160 which is relatively low for a new midrange card. It has some tangible advantages over the 4870/4890, such as considerably lower power consumption and heat, and DX11 features (if those are useful).

            • sreams
            • 9 years ago

            …but the 6770 looks like it will only be “marginally faster” than 5850/5850, if it is faster at all. By your definition, it is also lackluster. Personally, I think you are looking at it in the wrong way. x8xx cards are high end, and x7xx cards are midrange. If the x7xx cards of the next generation are as fast as the x8xx cards of the last, that is progress.

            • flip-mode
            • 9 years ago

            Heh, true. If the 6770 matches the 5870, you won’t hear me calling it lackluster. But you still may hear me call it overpriced – will have to wait and see!

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 9 years ago

            Yes, difference of opinion, but you have to consider that this is largely a matter of what demographic the type of monitor you use puts you in.

            This is a card suitable for 1920×1200, and that’s still just one step below the top of the line, just as it was in the 4870’s time, and will automatically put you into the enthusiast range.

            Plain and simple, they are not going to sell you a $100-ish enthusiast card, even if modern manufacturing allows for it. It probably has countless times in the past, but that’s been the $150-200 price range since at least the Geforce 6000 series. That was six years ago, and I can’t remember any further back than that, but I bet that started long before.

            So what do they do to make up the difference compared to the equally priced 512MB 4870s? They give you 1GB of RAM, DX11, and pretty substantial power savings. It’s not a total wash. It just depends on what you want. Those are probably things someone buying a $100-150 midrange card would like.

            If you want a “more than good enough” type of card, you’re probably the type of person who looks at the $200+ range to begin with. Ever bought a $200+ card? That might explain your difference of opinion.

            As much as people talk about profit margins and manufacturing costs, all the retail price comes down to is who is buying it.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 9 years ago

    /[

      • dpaus
      • 9 years ago

      His walk to work must take him through Gastown.

      • Vaughn
      • 9 years ago

      I think you mean East Hastings 😛

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        I think you mean “sweatshopking’s house”

    • Shining Arcanine
    • 9 years ago

    It seems like AMD is producing lesser versions of their 58×0 series and calling them the 67×0 series. It says nothing about the high-end. :/

      • Jigar
      • 9 years ago

      Yeah, how could they choose to go cheap route. correct ? /meter on ?

      • Voldenuit
      • 9 years ago

      No, the shift is much greater, since the 67xx chip has the new 4-SIMD shader instead of the older 5-SIMD one. The new shader is supposed to be more versatile and efficient, as well as provide greater performance. Either way, this is a big architectural shift and much more than Cypress warmed over.

      I also remember when the x7xx parts were the ‘high end’. Remember the 9700 Pro? Also, the 9500 Pro was the best “midrange” card ATI every made.

      Hoping to see some oomph in “midrange” this time, especially at midrange prices.

      • Farting Bob
      • 9 years ago

      It says that the higher end will be a fair bit faster than todays single GPU cards, if their midrange can match todays high end.

      • sigher
      • 9 years ago

      They updated the HDMI to 1.4a to support 3D, that’s the new part as far as I can tell, 3D display support.

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 9 years ago

    Since NVidia actually has competing parts this time around, I believe that we can expect Radeon HD6xxx prices to drop after introduction. This will be welcome instead of the increasing post-launch prices for Radeon HD58xx a year ago in an environment of strong demand and a lack of competition.

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 years ago

      what competition will there be? the 460 will be slower than the 6750, likely. If the 6750 is priced aggressively, why would anyone buy a 460? unless you love apex, cuda, etc. which not many people do…

      • YeuEmMaiMai
      • 9 years ago

      lol wut? Nvidia competing? they pretty much missed this product cycle by not introducing parts until at least 7 months after ATi…..lol Nvidia tech is pretty much one product cycle behind ATi at this point.

        • Voldenuit
        • 9 years ago

        Yet they are still putting out cards that are faster *and* cheaper than the competition with the 470 and 460.

        If nvidia can control the pricing of its cards, I don’t see why AMD can’t do the same despite what some of its apologists say. Paying $50 over MSRP for 10 months after a card came out was bad enough, the MSRP was too high to begin with and didn’t come down for ages.

        The 6xxx has me holding off on an upgrade from my trusty 4870, but whether I go green or red next round will depend solely on the value for performance they deliver.

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