OCZ Ibis SSD has four-way internal RAID, HSDL interface

While most solid-state disks are squeezed into the 2.5″ hard drive form factor, OCZ has been pursuing alternatives quite aggressively. The company already has 3.5″ and 1.8″ SSDs, and it’s put flash chips on mini and full-size PCI Express cards. OCZ has now introduced the Ibis, a 3.5″ solid-state drive that houses an internal RAID and connects to host systems via a new HSDL interface.

Otherwise known as the High Speed Data Link, HSDL was developed by OCZ to offer gobs of bandwidth to performance-starved users. The interface consolidates four lanes of PCI Express connectivity in a single SAS cable and purportedly offers 2-4GB/s of bandwidth. That might seem excessive given the speed of contemporary SSDs, but the Ibis is no ordinary solid-state disk. It has no fewer than four SandForce SF-1200 controllers onboard and is available in capacities up to 960GB.

AnandTech has taken a closer look at the Ibis, and its performance is impressive to say the least. The drive manages to eclipse 800MB/s with sequential reads and push nearly 675MB/s with sequential writes. Performance with random reads and writes is even more impressive—try 130,000 IOps for the latter and over 90,000 IOps for the former.

Obviously, the Ibis line is targeted at servers and workstations. Drives start at $529 for the 100GB model and range up to $2800 for the 960GB flagship. OCZ is shipping the Ibis with an HSDL card that has a single port and a PCIe x1 interface limited for gen-one speeds. An optional four-port card supports PCI Express 2.0 and looks to have an x4 interface.

Comments closed
    • blastdoor
    • 9 years ago

    Wow… is 800 MB/sec approximately the speed of RAM circa 2000, or am I remembering that wrong?

    • UberGerbil
    • 9 years ago

    I was wondering when Fusion IO was going to get some competition….

      • StashTheVampede
      • 9 years ago

      FusionIO has nothing to fear them these. They are strictly PCIe boards and already have been OEMs to HP and Dell.

        • UberGerbil
        • 9 years ago

        Sure, but there’s a big gulf between Fusion IO and run-of-the-mill (or even “pro” SLC NAND) SSDs — both in price and performance. There’s room for Fusion IO to grow down, or one of the SSD vendors to grow up, into that space. I was actually expecting Intel (or their partner, Micron) to go there first, since they have all the pieces and it’s a good fit in other ways. They probably still will. And to the extent that eats away at the potential for Fusion IO to expand its offerings, it’s competition.

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 9 years ago

    Not bad. But can it start Crysis in one second? 🙂

      • Byte Storm
      • 9 years ago

      It can start the internet in one second

        • axeman
        • 9 years ago

        Fool, the internet is wireless.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 9 years ago

    Forget 3-way SLI, this is now the e-peen king!

      • internetsandman
      • 9 years ago

      3-way SLI hasn’t been the e-peen king since EVGA introduced those 4-way SLI, dual LGA 1366 socket motherboards. Since then, 3 way SLI has just been “very impressive” not “uber-e-peen”

    • cygnus1
    • 9 years ago

    Yes. I could easily see a couple of those in a mirror in a database server.

    • ModernPrimitive
    • 9 years ago

    I may have to sell my car laptop and desk top and buy one of those… oh nevermind.

    Impressive performance though ! Nothing like screaming benchmarks over a cup of Seattle’s Best

    • mongoosesRawesome
    • 9 years ago

    Obviously not for me or for consumers, but $529 for performance like that? That’s a great deal for servers – as long as they aren’t consuming a lot of storage.

      • ybf
      • 9 years ago

      I don’t see why it wouldn’t be for consumers. Some consumers don’t mind paying $2k-4k for ass-kicking desktops.

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