New Fermi-based Quadros land at $599, $199

We saw entry-level, Fermi-based mobile GeForces last month. Now, it’s the Quadro family’s turn to get a helping of low-end Fermi goodness. Say hello to the Quadro 2000 and Quadro 600, which made their debut earlier this morning and, according to Nvidia, are already available either as standalone, PNY-branded cards or as part of pre-built Dell, HP, and Lenovo workstations.

Labeled a "mid-range" product by Nvidia, the Quadro 2000 has 192 stream processors, a gig of GDDR5 memory, a 128-bit memory interface, and a $599 suggested retail price. That card purportedly delivers 50% greater geometry performance than the previous-gen Quadro FX 1800, as well. The half-height Quadro 600 covers the "entry level" with 96 stream processors, 1GB of DDR3 RAM, a 128-bit memory interface, and a $199 MSRP.

Both offerings also have support for 3D Vision, 30-bit color displays, and Nvidia’s Mosaic technology, which "will enable any application to utilize one or more Quadro professional graphics solutions to scale across up to eight high-resolution displays." That feature hasn’t made it in quite yet, though—it’ll be introduced in a driver update later this quarter. On that note, I should point out that the Quadro 600 only has two display outputs: DVI and DisplayPort. The Quadro 2000 has a DVI output and dual DisplayPort, er, ports.

Comments closed
    • Zumberblump
    • 9 years ago

    specs for a GTX470
    CUDA Cores 448
    Standard Memory Config 1280 MB GDDR5
    Memory Interface Width 320-bit
    Memory Bandwidth (GB/sec) 133.9

    How is this Quadro 2000 any better? Or should I say what justifies paying $250 more for what appears to be a weaker card?

      • nekked
      • 9 years ago

      Just looking at the specs isn’t a very good way to compare these cards. They have different drivers, and i *think* slightly different hardware, that can allow them to be vastly faster in certain cases. Besides the speed though, your really paying to have drivers that are very stable, and guaranteed to work well with a lot of 3d content creation software.

      I make characters for games using Maya, Mudbox, ZBrush etc daily. I’ve used pretty much every recent card out there (gtx260, 285, 290, 470, 480, and now a quadrofx 5800) I thought the quadros were bs, till getting one.

      Loading some source characters with around 7 million quads into maya, would run at about .3 fps on a gtx480, and after swapping in the qfx 5800, ran at a silky 60-90 fps. The 5800 does have 4 gigs of ram, but it also has half the stream processors.

      Most companies I’ve worked at stick to the “gamer” cards because they mostly work pretty good (as long as its nvidia) and the price is right, but if you can get a deal on them, the quadros are excellent.

      • Forge
      • 9 years ago

      They don’t turn off some of the juicy GPGPU functionality, like they do on GeForces, and they let you use all the nifty pro-only drivers/utils/etc that are restricted or blocked on GeForce.

      • no51
      • 9 years ago

      I’d pay $250 more on a card to not lose half a day’s work on a daily basis when Solidworks crashes because of crappy drivers. But I guess if you buy a professional card for gaming, more power to you; I have some igloos in Arizona you might be interested in.

        • esterhasz
        • 9 years ago

        now that’s genuinely funny – thank you, sir!

    • d0g_p00p
    • 9 years ago

    I remember when the Quadro name used to mean professional.

      • UberGerbil
      • 9 years ago

      I thought it meant “charging you through the nose for certified drivers”?

        • Ryu Connor
        • 9 years ago

        96 stream processors with certified drivers and full double precision unlocked at $199?

        Who is this supposed to market to? Hobbyist who spent the majority of their dispoable incoming getting the AutoCAD license?

        It just seems so ineffectual for any real, hobby, or even development work in a niche field that’s always been grossly expensive.

          • Wintermane
          • 9 years ago

          Obviously there is a market for the low end model as they do sell other such low end professional cards.

            • Ryu Connor
            • 9 years ago

            Yeah, that it exist implies there is a market.

            I’m just curious who these buyers are. I don’t understand their world.

            • Wintermane
            • 9 years ago

            well early on nvidia ONLY made high end professial cards. They started making lower end ones awhile back and I assume must have sold alot of them as they kept it up.

            Id guess its graphics arts like poster making and such where a 30 bit color monitor is needed. Also remember it can dpo everything its big brother can do only slower and with alot less power used.

          • Farting Bob
          • 9 years ago

          l[

    • sweatshopking
    • 9 years ago

    8 DISPLAYS!!!!! ON 2 CONNECTIONS!!!! WOW NVIDIA DOES THE IMPOSSIBLE!!!

      • chasscF1
      • 9 years ago

      “will enable any application to utilize *[

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        i’m going to hook 4 of these badboys up? THAT WOULD BE AWESOME!!!

      • UberGerbil
      • 9 years ago

      Actually, it’s at least theoretically possible to daisychain four displays from one DisplayPort, and

      g[

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