Poll: How do you buy your music?

The music industry has changed a lot over the last decade. Online services have become huge, and MP3s have slowly clawed back ground previously taken by DRM-encrusted downloads. But has any of that changed your buying habits? That’s the subject of this week’s poll, which asks how you buy most of your music. You can cast your vote over on the right column on the front page or after clicking on the comment link below.

In last week’s poll, we tackled the subject of glossy notebooks. Unsurprisingly, 74% of voters would prefer their next portable to have a matte screen and surfaces. 14% would like a little gloss on their screen but not elsewhere. Only 5% want a matte screen with glossy surfaces, and just 2% would prefer gloss all around. Of those who voted, 5% have no preference either way.

Comments closed
    • David
    • 9 years ago

    I mostly use last.fm for music now, but I do buy some through iTune and Napster.

    I buy CDs infrequently at local shops or from Best Buy.

    • mcforce0208
    • 9 years ago

    I do buy some tracks….mostly not though……… pirate bay?? need i say more??

    • Voldenuit
    • 9 years ago

    I can barely remember the last time I bought a music CD. I have to say I’m not a fan of the monopolistic business practices of the music industry, and I don’t like how they have wrangled a legal stranglehold over music distribution and production, but in reality, I’m just not interested in much of the commercial music that is produced by big studios these days.

    I do however go to a lot of live music. I went to muse’s concert in KL, Radiohead’s concert in Indianapolis and I’m a regular at a few blues and jazz clubs that feature rotating live bands.

    Want to support the artists? Go to their shows. CDs and online sales just line the pockets of record executives. There are still plenty of musicians that make their living the hard way, and I salute them.

    • emorgoch
    • 9 years ago

    I’m probably closer to a 60/40 split between buying CDs online, and buying them at retail. The online stuff is mostly because I get the rarer items that you can’t buy in stores.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 9 years ago

    Haha lately I haven’t even pursued the ownership of any music, I just stream it. I know it doesn’t sound as good, but it feeds my desire.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 9 years ago

    To those who think that it’s disrespectful to the artist not to buy their music, all I have to say is I think that artists should be getting paid to play, not paid to make records. If it’s something they love to do then they’ll still keep doing it. Screw the industry, sure it helps artists reach more people but I still think it does more harm than good. Handel and Mozart didn’t get big with the help of record companies, they were just doing what they loved to do and followed their passion and people noticed. Today’s society turns aspiring artists into money hungry fame whores, when it really should be about the music. It’s pretty sad when it takes them as much time to touch up the photo on the front of the album as it does to perfect a recording. Hey, I wish I could hear some Iron Maiden when I turn on my radio, but no. All I hear is the other overplayed shit that the radio station is getting bribed to play. It’s ridiculous. No, I don’t always buy music, I do sometimes…but if they were here you bet I’d buy tickets to see them play and even get a T-shirt as well.

      • Sahrin
      • 9 years ago

      This argument is circular. You’re trying to say that because composers in the 18th century were well compensated, modern artists shouldn’t be?

      A person creates a work; they should be compensated for your enjoying it. It’s as simple as that. I don’t know what you do, but I seriously doubt you’d be receptive to doing it ‘for the love of it’ and send your paychecks back to your employers.

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        i have. i spent a fortune doing what i love and teaching kids in africa.

    • demani
    • 9 years ago

    -[

    • LovermanOwens
    • 9 years ago

    I don’t buy any CD’s anymore. BUT whenever an artist is in within a 3 hour drive I’ll go check out their concerts for sure and pick up a shirt. I know it really isn’t “right” but I don’t have any love for the music industry.

    • srg86
    • 9 years ago

    For me, if it’s an individual Track, I’ll Buy from Amazon MP3. Albums on the other hand I prefer to buy on CD.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 9 years ago

    Buy CDs online. I refuse to buy an inherently inferior product (mp3) but don’t download illegally either. With CDs I have an original physical copy from which I can transcode to any format I want, I currently put everything on a server in FLAC and also transcode to 256k and 128k mp3 for portable use. There is such a huge backlog of quality music from bands I know I like I don’t think I qill ever be ‘done.’ Amazon’s used CD marketplace is a cornucopia of great deals.

    • yogibbear
    • 9 years ago

    I still buy CDs at retail. Though if i’m not sure i’ll typically download it (illegally) and if i like it then i’ll buy it. Prob have about 1000 CD’s accumulated so far. (Only 23).

      • vince
      • 9 years ago

      It took me a second there to figure out 23 is your age… hehe (I was thinking… 23? you just said 1000’s!!)

      I guess MY age is turning my brain to jelly! LOL

    • FireGryphon
    • 9 years ago

    There’s precious little music these days that’s worth buying, but when there’s something I want, I usually go to a store and buy the CD. There’s something about owning the physical copy that makes me feel better about my purchase’s longevity. I only buy online if it’s a song I can’t feasibly get anywhere else.

    • MrBojangles
    • 9 years ago

    Since when does digital music cost money? lol you all are getting jipped.I have some air and tap water i could sell you, while your in the mood to hand out money needlessly.

      • yogibbear
      • 9 years ago

      LOL you do pay for air and tap water. RETARD! WTF do you think your rates are for?

        • MrBojangles
        • 9 years ago

        What??? You’ve peeked my intrest.Please do explain exactly how i’m paying for the air i’m breathing.The tap water is a given(even though i never said i was getting it for free in the first place.So if reading comprehension is taken into account. It begs to ask the question, who exactly is the “retard” here?)I know it cost money technically, but were talking less than a penny worth to fill up a glass and potentially charge you several dollars for it.Still a win for me a really stupid use of money on your end.

    • jackbomb
    • 9 years ago

    I buy CDs from Amazon and eBay. I sometimes even pick up DVD-A albums, if they’re cheap enough.

    I rip them all to FLAC (5.1 24/96 for DVD-A) and store them on my file server.

    • Prospero424
    • 9 years ago

    I buy the occasional CD because it’s the only way I can be sure that:

    1. The releases I want are available for purchase

    2. The releases I want aren’t compressed to a lossy format (I use lossless for archival)

    3. The releases I want can be converted to any format I may want to use for portable devices

    Album art/packaging is a bonus, but I don’t give a damn about the physical media. I prefer to store it digitally and back that copy up. That way my software can index it properly.

    Until there’s an online purchasing service that offers all of the above, I don’t see CDs dying any time soon.

    But mostly, I listen to streaming services these days. Last.fm, Slacker, and Songza.

    • burntham77
    • 9 years ago

    I like having the physical media, so I still buy CDs. There isn’t much new music I like, but there are few gems here and there. Lately I have been going back and buying older albums I missed. Mike and the Mechanics anyone?

    • Taddeusz
    • 9 years ago

    It’s kind of sad that such a great proportion of people have selected “Buy?”. I would hope most people are just joking but if you really do like the music you should buy it.

      • ClickClick5
      • 9 years ago

      Same here. I as well hope they are joking, if not, shame on a lot here.

        • Byte Storm
        • 9 years ago

        Actually, I selected that, but only because I listen to remixes of game music, which is free anyways. The non-game music that I do have, was purchased for me on Birthday and Christmas. I got a couple of CDs, but I stick to the game music, that’s just my style.

        Don’t think that everyone who selects that is stealing, just most of them.

      • nagashi
      • 9 years ago

      First off, there’s several other possibilities. The poll doesn’t account for people who either don’t listen to music at all (my roommate for example. Cool guy, but music just isn’t his thing), or insist on only listening to free music.

      I myself do NOT buy music or dvds EVER. And I have absolutely no guilt or qualms about that. Bands that I like, I pay to see in concert. They’re getting something from me that way. I would also note that a lot of the bands I really like actually have mp3s up for download on their sites, cost/obligation free.

        • vince
        • 9 years ago

        If I’m not mistaken, going to see a band in concert brings them more money than CD sales anyway. So I encourage you to continue.

        About the “buy?” response, there’s also the ones who listens to radio or streams, and don’t feel the need to buy the music. Mostly for “top 40” type stations, which play pretty much the same music day after day (they end up knowing the songs by heart, even though they do not own any of the artist’s albums… lol)

    • Lans
    • 9 years ago

    Since the question specifically says buy… I would have to answer CDs… mostly retail but some times e-tail.

    Now, I don’t really buy that much music compared to what I listen. I mainly listen on youtube, pandora, radio, etc then buy if I find myself wanting to listen to a particular song very often.

    • albundy
    • 9 years ago

    How do I buy most of your music?

    With money. is there any other way?

    • blastdoor
    • 9 years ago

    iTunes. Previously eMusic.

    i guess stealing music makes sense if you’re one of those lazy unemployed poor people, but really it’s pretty cheap to buy music on iTunes if you have a real job. I mostly pay just for the convenience rather than any great respect for the law.

    • EsotericLord
    • 9 years ago

    I used Zune Marketplace (on my Zune) to buy a song for the first time a bit ago. A few days later I plugged my Zune into my Xbox 360 and…trouble happened.

    I had accidently broken off the plastic USB protector that prevents you from plugging in devices the wrong way. When I plugged in my Zune (apparently the wrong way) things went wrong. My Xbox red ringed, and my zune died. I hadnt synced my Zune since I bought the song.

    My Xbox recovered with just a power cycle, but my Zune ( a 120 gig limited Gears of War 2 edition) is dead. 🙁

    To make matters worse, I later tried to redownload the song ( it was “Cooler Than Me”, if you must know), Zune Marketplace said I was only allowed the one download.
    DRM sucks.

    And since no one else is saying it…. “Buy?”

      • Peffse
      • 9 years ago

      Yea, people don’t seem to realize you don’t buy songs from those marketplaces…. you rent them.

        • LovermanOwens
        • 9 years ago

        Don’t you get 10 or so songs a month DRM free for keeps?

          • EsotericLord
          • 9 years ago

          I didnt user Zune pass, I used the marketplace to BUY (for like a $1.30) a song on my zune, then my Zune broke before I could put that song on my computer, and then when I tried to redownload said song I was told that I had “reached my download limit.”

          Although I suppose I should be more put off by the loss of my $280 MP3 player.

    • Lane
    • 9 years ago

    It’s sad that there are so many thieves out there.

      • crabjokeman
      • 9 years ago

      It’s even sadder that many of them hold positions of esteem and power 😉

      • Suspenders
      • 9 years ago

      Yeah, I’m so totally weeping…

    • FuturePastNow
    • 9 years ago

    I buy CDs and immediately rip them (often I don’t even listen to the CD directly). The disc is a better backup than any backup I could make.

    I only buy from a used CD store (and I accidentally clicked the wrong poll option). It supports a local small business and not a dime of mine goes to the RIAA.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 9 years ago

    “The music industry has changed a lot over the last decade.”

    Lol yeah right.

    • ShadowTiger
    • 9 years ago

    I get all my music from di.fm

      • Palek
      • 9 years ago

      Yeah, I listen to them occasionally, though I use sky.fm more (especially the Bossa Nova channel, which is awesome).

      (I bought a Roku SoundBridge just before Roku stopped making them. Best device I have ever bought, bar none. Makes internet radio listening embarrassingly simple. Grace Digital Audio seems to make some promising replacements.)

      Oh, I buy all my music as CDs from Amazon.co.uk and rip them to VBR MP3s.

    • plonk420
    • 9 years ago

    beatport, occasionally magnatune. i PREFER cd, but it’s hard to find some electronica on cd, tho

    • Aphasia
    • 9 years ago

    Since I got spotify I havent either bought or downloaded anything. And now when I finally got a decent phone, I will go premium and have everything directly into my mobile too boot.

      • kyboshed
      • 9 years ago

      +1 to that – I have a Spotify premium account which lets me pick from around 10 million tracks to listen to at home, at work and everywhere in between (on a smart phone) without the need for syncing (though you can download tracks for playing offline, which is handy in areas with spotty 3G reception).

      Yes, my investment will be for nothing if the service goes tits up, but I don’t see myself buying another CD while Spotify’s an option…

      (PS, I don’t actually work for them!)

    • Dashak
    • 9 years ago

    I voted “Buy?” because I normally use Grooveshark at home. It sounds better than youtube. I think it’s encoded at a higher bitrate?

    I’ve got enough invested in my aging Cowon iAudio X5 20GB to keep me entertained on the go. I might have to upgrade in the next couple of years since the battery holds slightly less than 3 hours, but that’s a couple years away yet.

    • quarantined
    • 9 years ago

    Personally, I don’t think there is enough DRM placed on the precious sounds of music. It really needs to be taken to the next level with DRM schemes that only allow a person to listen to a song 3 times before they must renew the license to continue listening to the song.

    Hell I think the US government should copyright each individual note that falls within detectable range of the human ear. Citizens should have to not only pay for a license to hear notes, but pay for a license to so much as open their sh*tty mouths in public places. That’s the way it should be.

      • My Johnson
      • 9 years ago

      And copyright really needs to last at least a millennium. What is it now? About a century? That’s both a pittance and a fraud.

      • FireGryphon
      • 9 years ago

      I’m all for legislation that keeps stupid people quiet.

    • StashTheVampede
    • 9 years ago

    I buy physical, then digitize it.

    • just brew it!
    • 9 years ago

    The vast majority of the music I buy is still on CD. Lately I’ve started buying a few things online from Rhapsody’s MP3 store — mostly stuff that is either really expensive on CD (imports) or out of print.

      • vince
      • 9 years ago

      Same here. Latest one: Faces from Shawn Philipps (I’m sure you know him). Such an excellent CD, but nowhere to be found at a decent price.

      But I rarely have to do this though…

    • WalkCMD
    • 9 years ago

    Amazon MP3. Their DRM-free songs and $5 album prices are awesome.

    • [+Duracell-]
    • 9 years ago

    A lot of my music collection was hard to get since most of it was from Japan (lots of J-core, Bemani albums/soundtracks, Super Eurobeat) and I was poor, so I couldn’t afford it. Hence “Buy?”

    Now that I have a better job, I will be able to buy more CDs if I feel it’s worth the purchase. DJ Sharpnel or Pendulum album? Hell yeah I’ll put down $30 for it, because I know I’ll be able to enjoy it over and over, plus I’ll be able to rip in FLAC.

    I don’t like iTunes, nor do I really care for MP3s unless they’re a high quality compression. Amazon offers only 256kbps CBR, so that’s out for me. When I can find an outlet that can serve me either FLAC/lossless or V0 MP3s, I’ll be all over it.

    • TaBoVilla
    • 9 years ago

    does youtube count?

    • geekl33tgamer
    • 9 years ago

    Be interesting to see how many choose “Buy?”. Thankfully you can remain anon in the poll! You bit-torrenting freeloaders will come un-stuck on my ISP – P2P is totally blocked. I can live with the fact that uTorrent don’t even exchange 1kb of data, but my stupid ISP also block Sky TV’s SkyPlayer Software (Uses Kazalia P2P to recieve the encrypted TV shows) that I have to pay for as part of my TV subscription.

    SkyPlayer is not illegal to use, but when I challenged my ISP they said it was!!! Loons. FWIW, and getting back on topic, my music mostly comes from iTunes.

    • Suspenders
    • 9 years ago

    I dabble in a little of everything. A lot of my music (~30%) I buy online as CDs from Amazon. Another chunk of CD’s comes from local brick and mortar shops. I have a nascent, but steadily expanding vinyl collection.

    The “Buy?” category is stocked with a lot of foreign stuff (from a N. American perspective), like Eastern European, Finnish and Japanese music, plus a lot of soundtracks (although about half of my soundtracks are CD’s). Almost all of my video game sountracks fall under “Buy?”…

    No online MP3 shopping for me, though. I like having the real thing in my hands.

    • jsfetzik
    • 9 years ago

    Most of my music is still purchased on CDs, about 50/50 from online and brick & mortar. Mostly because for what I get it is cheaper to buy the CD then digital downloads. Plus I get the lossless version that I rip to FLAC and then transcode to MP3 for portable devices.

    I occasionally buy MP3 downloads form Amazon, when they are significantly cheaper then the CD. I also buy MP3 or FLAC downloads through a few artists sites. I never buy iTunes or any other format with DRM.

    • ImSpartacus
    • 9 years ago

    I get CDs from the library. It’s free and legal.

    • Johnny5
    • 9 years ago

    Currently most of my music is pirated, but I plan to legitimize my collection at some point, at least the full albums. Just as long as I can find good quality, DRM-free at a good price. I don’t see it happening for a while though, at least not until after I move out.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 9 years ago

      Amazon MP3 not DRM-free enough for you?

        • paulWTAMU
        • 9 years ago

        that’s the sort of justification that makes people like me cringe. I’m generally anti-DRM but the “hey, I’ll pay whatever pittance I want and you damn well better be OK with it” crap is an argument for it…*sigh*

        Look, music on Amazon isn’t badly priced, for the most part. and even if it was, you have zero inherent right to be entertained.

          • Johnny5
          • 9 years ago

          I see I wasn’t clear on what I meant. I am not saying that there is any problem with the current prices, I don’t even know what the current prices are, and I don’t think it will be an issue. Just like I don’t think finding DRM-free music or music of sufficient quality to be a problem, I was just listing them as things that could possibly (but are unlikely to) make me think twice about it. I’m just saying I don’t plan on legitimizing my music collection for a while yet because I have higher financial priorities. I’m not a big spender, and I’m going into a high income trade in the future, so it shouldn’t be all that long before the desire to legitimize outweighs the need to save.

          “…and even if it was, you have zero inherent right to be entertained. ”
          While I agree that people/companies should be able to price their goods and services as they see fit, there is a threshold past which I will refuse to go. Business-wise they tend to maximize profits by trying to get the most money from the most people, which is fine. On the other hand in the hypothetical situation where they would increase price to such an extreme that the decrease in number of purchases means they aren’t even increasing profit, then I would have less goodwill towards the person/company that doesn’t respect its customer. In the case of music this means I would be inclined to pirate, and not feel bad about it. But, again I think music prices are reasonable, so it shouldn’t be a problem.

            • videobits
            • 9 years ago

            ” I’m just saying I don’t plan on legitimizing my music collection for a while yet because I have higher financial priorities. I’m not a big spender, and I’m going into a high income trade in the future, so it shouldn’t be all that long before the desire to legitimize outweighs the need to save.”

            So, if given the opportunity, you’d also walk into the Ford dealer and drive away with a new Mustang and a plan to pay ‘when you get around to it’.

            How about some real values? Work => Money => Rewards
            In that order. Work first then reap the benefits.

            Let me guess, you probably share the same attitude as some other slackers I’ve met : “I’ll work harder when they pay me more” rather than proving your value first.

            • Voldenuit
            • 9 years ago

            Shouldn’t the same standard be applied to record companies?

            They are basically leeching money from artists, and strangling creativity and variety in the music arena with their restrictive monopoly.

            If they want money from the consumer, they need to make it worth the expenditure and effort.

            • paulWTAMU
            • 9 years ago

            And that would be a fantastic reason to not buy from them, which is different than taking what you want without paying (I’m avoiding calling it stealing to avoid that debate). These sorts of transactions are pretty binary, not granular. Yes, I’ll pay and get this, or no I won’t pay and I’ll go without…those are the correct options, and both are valid. Saying I don’t like what you do but I want the results without incurring any cost is just asinine.

            • Voldenuit
            • 9 years ago

            In this case, though, a generalised unwillingness (or even apathy) to support the RIAA (among filesharers, conscientious objectors, and connoisseurs of live music – note that these populations overlap with each other and with regular music fans) may be exactly what is needed to topple the house of cards built by the music mafia.

            Can’t say I’ll be sorry to see them go. And for those who claim that jobs will be lost, I think instead that more job opportunities will be created since the industry would no longer be monopolized.

    • anotherengineer
    • 9 years ago

    I havent even listened to music in 3 + yrs, with the exception of whatever is on the radio when I have to drive somewhere.

      • RickyTick
      • 9 years ago

      For me it’s more like 12 years. Give me News/Talk/Sports anytime.

    • paulWTAMU
    • 9 years ago

    Amazon downloads almost exclusively since 07. Prior to that, I bought physical CDs where ever they were cheapest.

    • johnrreagan
    • 9 years ago

    I buy about 50-60% as CDs online (often Amazon). Most of the rest as online downloads (again often Amazon). The rest I buy directly from the artist at concerts, etc.

    I know several musicians (including my ex-wife). I don’t share music or download “free” stuff. On occasion, I’ve ripped a CD from a friend, but if I like it, I’ll actually buy it.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 9 years ago

    iTunes is just so convenient. Seemingly everything I could ever want to listen to is in the store and it goes into the library of my default media library app seamlessly. Amazon’s downloader has done the job for a couple of things I could not find on iTunes and fortunately it has a way to get stuff into iTunes just by sticking copies of what I download into the “Automatically Add to iTunes” folder within my iTunes libary, so the next timeI fire iTunes up it gets copied into that library.

    These two things work so well together I haven’t bought a CD at all in around 3 years. It’s fantastic.

    • njenabnit
    • 9 years ago

    the only reason I use itunes is because I can download the music straight from my iphone over 3G and listen to it. That way I can grab music on the go. The combo of hearing a song I like, using Shazam or similar apps to I.D. the song, and downloading it straight to my phone has worked wonders.

    • Corrado
    • 9 years ago

    I have the upgraded Pandora One. I just put that on when I’m in the mood for music. Most often though, I listen to podcasts, This American Life, NPR, or Howard Stern on Sirius.

    • KalieMa
    • 9 years ago

    I buy new vinyl and, occasionally, used vinyl from local record stores or directly from touring bands when they come through town. There’s something incredibly satisfying about the physical artefact and it’s just that much more satisfying to put money directly into an artist’s pocket and shake their hand over the purchase.

    If I want a digital/iPhone/iPod copy I’m much more likely to buy a used CD at said stores too since it’s almost always cheaper than iTunes or other online stores (mp3fiesta not included of course, but I’m not a fan). Only in rare circumstances do I hit up the iTunes store on my iPhone, maybe once a month, and almost always for a single track I can’t live without at that moment.

    I actually enjoy the record store experience quite a bit. In the Twin Cities we’re quite lucky to have a half-dozen awesome local record stores that are still around and I want to support them as much as possible. The folks working these stores have done more to introduce me to music I love – new and old – than any online site or service. Well, with the exception of some band-centric mailing lists – the dirtylist Underworld fan mailing list was so awesome back in the day…

    • esterhasz
    • 9 years ago

    emusic, five years subscribed and still lovin’ it…

    • willmore
    • 9 years ago

    I guess I grew out of this. I haven’t bought (or otherwise aquired) any music in years. I think the last thing I bougt was some CDs from an online store.

    • sreams
    • 9 years ago

    I -always- buy CDs, because then I have full control of what quality/format the resulting DRM-free song files are in. Ones I get the files I want, the CD is stored away as an uncompressed high quality backup.

    • bigdubs
    • 9 years ago

    FIRST RULE OF WHAT IS YOU DON’T TALK ABOUT WHAT (waffles.fm is an awesome recipe site btw, true story).

    uh, think the last time i bought a cd was sometime in 2005. been a while.

    • mongoosesRawesome
    • 9 years ago

    I’ve been using napster to choose what to buy and then purchasing mp3’s wherever I can find them cheapest.

    Napster is really the way to go. They give you 15 credits (similar to 15 mp3s) and for 3 months you can listen to most of their entire library for as long as you want, for 15 dollars.

    Last.fm is also nice for music recommendations when I don’t have the napster account activated.

    • Skrying
    • 9 years ago

    I buy only from the band or their record label. Typically the music I purchase represents a great value. $15 will net the vinyl, CD, mp3 of album, poster and probably a hand written note thanking me for my purchase. $15 for something I’ll get hours upon hours of use out of and some great art to look at during the first listen? Beats out any movie, game or nearly anything else I could buy with that money instead.

    Music is a great value. Sadly the market for it has been ruined by the major labels.

    • homerdog
    • 9 years ago

    I have a subscription to Rhapsody, so I voted “Buy?”. I would’ve voted “Other online service”, but I’m not exactly buying any music. More like renting it for as long as my subscription is active.

    If it’s a band I really like I’ll buy the CD.

      • puppetworx
      • 9 years ago

      Likewise, I’m on Spotify here in the UK.

    • NQbass7
    • 9 years ago

    Used iTunes for a while, got sick of the “Processing” that slowed my comp down and took forever. Been using Amazon since then. I don’t have the patience, space, or time to manage physical CD’s.

    • bowman
    • 9 years ago

    I’ve only bought three albums in what must be ten years now. All of them sold by people who decided to sell their music directly rather than going through the record industry.

    Oh, and they’re all signed too ^_^

    • NeelyCam
    • 9 years ago

    Buy (usually used) CDs from Amazon and rip.

    Although, that might become illegal… RIAA might not like to have used CDs being sold..

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 9 years ago

    I use mp3va.com, which is one of those deep-deep discount DRM-free mp3 stores. Selection is spotty, but the prices are great.

      • mongoosesRawesome
      • 9 years ago

      most likely not legal. their license to sell mp3’s is based on streaming, not selling the mp3’s outright.

      legalsounds and others do the same thing.

    • bthylafh
    • 9 years ago

    I don’t buy music often (and not because I pirate). My most recent bought album was on iTunes, which was because that was the only way of getting it. Previous to that, I’ve bought one album and a single from Amazon’s MP3 service.

    I have bought a CD somewhat recently, but it was used.

    I think DRM-free music downloads are the future for my purchases.

    • flip-mode
    • 9 years ago

    Amazon MP3 for the win. I’ve bought more on Amazon MP3 in the last 6 months than all music purchases I’d made in the previous 5 years. That amounts to all of 3 or 4 albums plus maybe 10 single songs, but still…

    • TurtlePerson2
    • 9 years ago

    I don’t really understand why someone would use iTunes. Amazon MP3 downloads straight into iTunes and almost always costs less. I used to be an iTunes guy, but I haven’t had a reason to get anything there in a long time.

    • cphite
    • 9 years ago

    I still buy CD’s of my favorite bands – I like having the artwork, and CD’s sound better in the car. But everything else for the past couple of years has come from Amazon MP3.

      • glynor
      • 9 years ago

      LAME -V2, which is the setup used by Amazon for the files on their MP3 store, is almost always transparent (except for with certain contrived sample files). If you do a fair blind listening test, this holds true for high-end audiophile gear in a controlled listening environment, and would *[

        • cphite
        • 9 years ago

        /[

          • not@home
          • 9 years ago

          That is the exact problem I have.

        • indeego
        • 9 years ago

        Another audiophile responds when never askedg{<.<}g

      • plonk420
      • 9 years ago

      if and when Amazon (or someone with a similar selection) offers lossless, i’m in!

    • joselillo_25
    • 9 years ago

    I use spotify

    • 5150
    • 9 years ago

    If music was worth a damn anymore, I might consider paying for music. I think it would be cheaper just to buy an Auto Tuner and make my own pop music.

      • 5150
      • 9 years ago

      The next CD I buy will be Van Halen’s new album. MAKE IT HAPPEN EDDIE FFS!

      • BoBzeBuilder
      • 9 years ago

      While I agree with the laughable state of today’s music, there are some very decent bands currently working. Also there’s a HUGE catalog of great older music left behind for us to discover.

      • RickyTick
      • 9 years ago

      Rap Music…The ultimate oxymoron.

      • swaaye
      • 9 years ago

      I think the radio is what’s laughable, but there’s certainly more music to choose from out there than what the radio spews forth. 🙂

      • Mr.Lif
      • 9 years ago

      Amen to this.
      Most of the music out today is garbage. The funny thing is I’m not entitled to rant about music as I’m not OLD enough.
      When I was a kid I hated most all music. I still do. The only things I can enjoy are video game chip tunes and tracks made by ‘scene’ composers. The other is ambient artists.
      The former you can’t buy, as it’s free.

      MUSIC SHOULD BE FREE!

      • Kaleid
      • 9 years ago

      Auto-tuner is evil and the penalty should be a death sentence! 😛

        • Suspenders
        • 9 years ago

        …or at least ten years in Siberia. It’s pretty fair, we’re not asking for much here 🙂

      • PeterD
      • 9 years ago

      If you think it’s worthless, then why do you listen to it? Sounds like a waste of time to me if you listen to worthless music. So, why download it anyway, pirated or legal? Sounds if more like a waste of time to me of you bother to download or copy worthless music. Go for a walk instead. Could be good for your health. See some scenery. Get our of your dungeon.

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 9 years ago

    I used iTunes until I realized CD’s are way better. You get your artwork and you can rip the songs lossless if you want. Not to mention you won’t have to burn them on a CD when you want to play it the car. Also I don’t trust iTunes, a lot of the songs that I paid for a long time ago no longer appear under the “Purchased” tab, even tho it’s under the same account.

    • Code:[M]ayhem
    • 9 years ago

    People actually pay money for music??? How last century

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      CRIMINAL!
      You’ll go to jail.

        • khands
        • 9 years ago

        I’ve never been one who really needed to hear a song over and over again, I don’t buy because, even if I liked the song, I never feel the need to hear it again. I’m sure I’m an odd one out, but that’s the way it is for me.

        • Code:[M]ayhem
        • 9 years ago

        You’ll never catch me, coppers!

        • vince
        • 9 years ago

        and do not pass GO!

    • Homerr
    • 9 years ago

    Pandora and last.fm, why buy?

    • Sanctusx2
    • 9 years ago

    For many years I was in the “Buy?” category, but the past 5 or so I’m in the Amazon Mp3 category. They have a lot of music that iTunes and even illegitimate sources do not have, and it’s in good ‘ol mp3. It’s win/win all round complete with perfectly reasonable prices and previews.

    I do, however, fall back to torrents and even iTunes if I can’t find something first on Amazon.

    • RickyTick
    • 9 years ago

    Voted “Other”.

    I’m one of the few using a Zune HD. An underrated piece of hardware. The Zune marketplace is a bit lacking though.

      • cphite
      • 9 years ago

      I’m on my second Zune – my first 30 ran out of space so I got the 120. It’s highly underrated in my opinion.

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        I had a 120 for a few years, before wife made me sell my SLI rig, and I needed email access. at that point i “updated” to a ipod touch. I would beat my mother to death for a zune hd. I cannot stand Itunes. I’d rather have a lobotomy than be forced to use that awful piece of software. I like the zune HD UI and the zune pass as well. Underwhelmed with my ipod, that’s for sure.

          • RickyTick
          • 9 years ago

          Mine is a Zune HD 16gb. Very nice piece.

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 9 years ago

      As did I. Zune 8GB owner. My wife has the HD 16gb & an 80GB. The 30GB bit the dust.

      • no51
      • 9 years ago

      I use Zune too, I have a 30gb and a 120gb. I use the Zune Pass as well as my listening habits make it worth it.

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