Ubuntu 10.10 adds paid app store, new netbook goodies

The people at Canonical are still sticking tightly to their biannual release schedule for Ubuntu, it looks like. The latest version of the operating system, Ubuntu Linux 10.10, is now available for download in desktop, netbook, and server variants.

According to the official announcement, this release snazzes up the Ubuntu One "personal cloud service" with iPhone, Android, and Windows interoperability, improving performance and adding new services along the way. Canonical says folks can stream music from their Ubuntu One account directly to their phones and synchronize contacts. The free, base Ubuntu One service provides 2GB of capacity—extra 20GB "blocks" are available for a fee.

Other improvements: the Ubuntu Software Centre now lets users purchase commercial software, App Store-style. Canonical has also tweaked the netbook edition of Ubuntu with a new user interface called Unity, screenshots of which are available here. The new interface has bigger icons with a sort of Windows 7-like task bar on the side, and it purportedly supports "touch and gestures for the increasing number of devices that will support it."

Comments closed
    • End User
    • 9 years ago

    10.10 fixed the wake from Suspend issue I was having on my 1210N.

    I love the Ubuntu font!

    • MadManOriginal
    • 9 years ago

    4th sign of the Apocolypse: paying for Linux software (not support a la IBM, Redhat etc.)

      • StashTheVampede
      • 9 years ago

      I have no qualms purchasing a piece of software on linux that I simply cannot duplicate in the free world.

      Examples: commercial sql server clients. There are some wonderful freebies for MySQL and PostgreSQL DBs, but there are plenty of shops that are on Oracle or Microsoft SQL server and the free clients aren’t what *I* prefer. Enter a handful of commercial programs that run on linux and do exactly what I want, play nice with my window manager, etc.

        • axeman
        • 9 years ago

        Does the Oracle _client_ cost money? I’d assume there are costs associated with certain tools, but not the client. Now for MS-SQL, you’d be some sort of weird pervert to be developing a native Linux app that uses a MS-SQL backend.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 9 years ago

    An app store will attract more developrs to the platform. I don’t mind paying for good content or having it agrigated for me. I do hope that this doesn’t mean that standards become pay for but rather that this encourages growth and further creative developement.

      • Skrying
      • 9 years ago

      I seriously doubt that. It’s not as if paid applications were impossible in the past on Ubuntu. Numerous ones exist. What keeps some companies and developers away from Linux is the small market size and that many of the users would strongly prefer a free and open source alternative.

        • axeman
        • 9 years ago

        What keeps some companies and developers away from Linux is the small market size and that -[

    • ew
    • 9 years ago

    I’m opening my own app store now.

      • Trymor
      • 9 years ago

      right…

    • dustyjamessutton
    • 9 years ago

    The paid app store is a slap in the face of Linux. Linux is all about being free.

      • StashTheVampede
      • 9 years ago

      linux is about freedom of choice.

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        I have to agree. I don’t personally think that Linux is all about “free”. But then, i didn’t make it.

        • Peffse
        • 9 years ago

        I think you have it right. I never got the free as in freedom and not beer thing… but paid content isn’t necessarily bad for choice.

        • ew
        • 9 years ago

        Not according to RMS.

          • StashTheVampede
          • 9 years ago

          Richard Stallman is nutjob that does fantastic work. His motives are making the highest quality product that no one can buy. Kudos to all his hard work and accomplishments.

          I, along with many others, do not agree with him about linux’s intentions.

      • indeego
      • 9 years ago

      Red Hat, IBM, Amazon weepsg{<.<}g

      • Meadows
      • 9 years ago

      No it’s not.

      • DrCR
      • 9 years ago

      To say that payware and OS can’t exist side by side is only a demonstration of ignorance.

      • just brew it!
      • 9 years ago

      Umm… no.

      It’s not /[

    • sweatshopking
    • 9 years ago

    sweet. still have to boot to windows for my games though. I really hope they can implement full dx10/11 support in the gallium drivers, that would allow me to play any game. I realize that’s not really the idea, and there’s more to it than that, but that’s the only thing keeping me on windows.

      • Thrashdog
      • 9 years ago

      WINE has made great strides. Going by their compatibility database, Starcraft II and Civ5 install right off the CD and play with minimal issues. Other things that work include Steam, the majority of Source-based games, World of Warcraft, and even Crysis.

      I need to see if the official release fixed whatever bug it was that made the rt2500 drivers drag my entire wireless network to its knees, though…

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        they have, but i still can’t get the few games i play to work. IE just cause 2. Heroes of newerth is native, and I love that, but i do love my just cause 2.

        • End User
        • 9 years ago

        I get as far as running Steam but TF2 fails to launch on two machines. 🙁

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