HP officially intros Windows 7 slate at $799

I guess that settles the question of whether or not HP will scrap its Windows 7 slate plans. Engadget reports that HP officially announced the Slate 500 late last night; the product is aimed at business and enterprise customers, and it will cost $799 with an included digital pen, HDMI-equipped dock, and "HP Slate Portfolio" case.

Engadget says the 1.5-pound HP Slate 500 includes a 1.86GHz Atom Z540 processor, 2GB of RAM, a 64GB solid-state drive, and a Broadcom Crystal HD video decoding chip. Atop all of that hardware sits an 8.9" capacitive touch screen, which has a 1024×600 resolution—exactly the same as most netbooks.

Considering it runs Windows 7 Home Premium, I’m guessing the Slate 500 feels about as cramped to use as a netbook in landscape mode. Steve Ballmer’s CES demo showed the device running in portrait mode, though, so that’s hopefully still an option for reading long articles.

Engadget points out a few little eccentricities, too, like the control-alt-delete button (no, it wasn’t just a prank dreamed up for that unofficial video preview), the lack of a slot inside the system for the digital pen, and the presence of a "slide-out Windows license" on the right. I’m sure some business folks will be overjoyed with the option to run Windows 7 on a nine-inch slate, but considering the price and the lack of a touch-specific UI, I’m starting to see why HP is saving its WebOS slates for consumers.

Comments closed
    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 12 years ago

    At that price with that OS, an atom is a extremely poor choice. I’d rather it pack a i3 and 4 gb of ram considering its cost. No overlay is fine but don’t charge 200 dollars more than the competitors who all have overlays for touch interface. I’m quite dissapointed at this end design. The hardware/software combo makes no real sense. Anything packing an atom or something slower shouldn’t waste its time on a windows OS sorry.

    • ronch
    • 12 years ago

    I think the slate’s only drawbacks are when typing documents and the smallish screen sizes. The former can easily be remedied by plugging in a USB keyboard. They do have USB ports, don’t they? And if the manufacturer can also bundle a stand to go along with it, then better. It’s like you can hang it, plug in a keyboard, and use it as a regular PC. And when it’s time to scram, you take it off the stand, unplug the keyboard, and go. The latter (screen size), however, is a bit tricky to remedy as touch screens of larger sizes are likely to send prices through the roof, and larger screens are heavier and bulkier, some aspects some people are quite particular about.

    Then again, practically speaking, laptops do this sort of thing already, albeit without the glamor of touchscreen that’s sweeping the world (the ~10% of the world populaton who can afford it, anyway) right now.

    • ludi
    • 12 years ago

    I take it you never experienced an original 7″ EeePC or one of the several subsequent 9″ netbooks that used an “SSD” which was nearly as slow as the average USB key drive. The latency of ordinary disc actions could be measured on a stopwatch, and you were MUCH better off with an HDD in those cases.

    • burntham77
    • 12 years ago

    It’s a start.

    • blastdoor
    • 12 years ago

    I think you are projecting your own issues onto me.

    Web pages without flash load faster than web pages with flash, and in most cases it’s because of flash ads that most people would prefer not to see anyway. That is why flashblocking plugins for both windows and Mac browsers existed long before Steve jobs said anything about flash, and it’s why forumns on sites like this had plenty of anti-flash commentary long before Steve jobs said anything about flash.

    Now that many websites are offering video using formats other than flash, people with browsers/devices capable of playing the non -flash video are better off.

    Of course, there remain some productive uses for flash that people without a flash plugin are missing out on.

    The overall tradeoff, then, is slow loading webpages and video with flash, but missing out on some worthwhile content without flash.

    So yes, the hp slate would generally feel faster browsing the web without flash, but with the same tradeoff experienced by iPad users.

    Did you really need me to explain this? Was it truly not obvious before? Or were you just exhibiting the type of bias that you were accusing me of? Think about it, won’t you?

    • jstern
    • 12 years ago

    So if I get an HP slate and uninstall flash, will it make it snappier?

    Would you have mentioned flash if Steve didn’t have a beef with Adobe?
    (The whole Apple user outrage towards flash fascinates me. It was a non issue before Steve came out against it, but now Mac users have to take shot against it every time they can. It’s as if Steve came out against 7up, and Apple users started all of sudden saying things, “As long as the user is not drinking 7up and is using using the appropriate OS, things will be snappy.”)

    • blastdoor
    • 12 years ago

    So let me ask you this, did you literally “laugh out loud”?

    • Trymor
    • 12 years ago

    Edit: Never mind, read it wrong.

    Are you criminally insane, or just trolling? 😉

    • Trymor
    • 12 years ago

    I believe that the main point of what he was saying, is that the iPad is the better ‘experience’, and I agree.

    • blastdoor
    • 12 years ago

    So… are you suggesting that the Atom in question is slower than the A4?

    • muddybulldog
    • 12 years ago

    Once again, someone comparing the clock speed of two completely different architectures as some type of benchmark. Let’s ask a question, which would you prefer to have in your new toy, a 2.4Ghz Core i5 or a 3.73Ghz Pentium D? At least those are made by the same company. Still not comparable at the clock level though.

    • muddybulldog
    • 12 years ago

    <remove dupe>

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 12 years ago

    This is business! It can’t just work and make sense. Email must only be accessible by pressing 14 places on the screen at the same time, while doing a dance. It must also run over 100 mystery background processes that eat so much CPU at idle that opening a Word document causes the entire computer to come to a screeching halt.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 12 years ago

    I’m so hurt. You hit me right in the non-existant slate fanboy heart. Clearly, I am the one taking these things too personally.

    On a different note, man, people who say things like “slate battlefront” are like the modern day Fonz.

    • no51
    • 12 years ago

    For those clamoring “too expensive” and “maxipad is better” take a look at this: §[<http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16823100048<]§ It's a Wacom Cintiq. This slate is basically that and a netbook combined.

    • paulWTAMU
    • 12 years ago

    if it was 200 bucks cheaper it’d be great…

    • indeego
    • 12 years ago

    Aimed for business and enterprise but has home premiumg{

    • jstern
    • 12 years ago

    What’s with the hate of an ctrl alt delete button? This is Windows 7, not Windows 95. It doesn’t reset the system, it send you to a menu that gives you the option of, locking the computer, switch user, log off, change the password, or start the task manager. (I pressed ctrl alt delete a couple of time to check the list, and Esc to come back.)

    Edit: I read a little bit about Ctrl Alt Delete on Wikipedia earlier, and it seems that it resets the system is you’re using DOS, not Windows 95. On Windows 95 it gives you a little menu or something like the the task manager.

    • Decelerate
    • 12 years ago

    Your example describes one of many. Where’s the rest of the competition on the slate battlefront?

    Oh right, still at the shop prepping it up.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 12 years ago

    Hey, one time, I saw a laptop that was even more expensive than a Macbook Pro.

    Therefore, Macbook Pros are not expensive.

    *WOOP WOOP WOOP* LOGIC FAIL ALERT!

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 12 years ago

    The “niche” of business? lol

    • Decelerate
    • 12 years ago

    This should serve as proof against all the web geniuses that claimed that the iPad was too expensive.

    I doubt any atom-based win7 slate can beat the iPad. Hope the Android camp show better products (I’m not too fond of the Galaxy Tab’s price point either).

    And HP, what the heck are you doing with Palm’s OS?

    • albundy
    • 12 years ago

    about time! cant wait for the locust infestation of these things to drop the price a few hundred notches.

    • blastdoor
    • 12 years ago

    The spec comparison between this and the iPad is pretty interesting. You can get an iPad with a better screen and the same amount of SSD storage for less money. Of course, you also get a slower CPU and less RAM. BUT — because the iPad runs an OS more appropriate to its purpose (and does not include Adobe Flash), it might end up *feeling* faster / more powerful than the HP in many settings.

    While I can imagine that a niche exists for this HP slate, I suspect it’s a pretty small niche.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 12 years ago

    I wouldn’t get your hopes up. They really just don’t seem to care about making Atom “competitive” as a PC platform. To Intel, that means making it compete with themselves.

    That opportunity has already existed for a long time, but after the “romg netbooks cannibalize laptops” fiasco, they’ve put all the emphasis on reorganizing their higher end lines to fit for the same concept.

    And it not only works, but much better. The problem is just that they’re not going to let us have it for $200-300, as was the plan with netbooks. They don’t even want netbooks there, as you can see with the dual-core Atom. :p

    What Bobcat will likely do is force Intel into releasing new $80-100ish CULV CPUs that don’t make significant compromises.

    • Skrying
    • 12 years ago

    If the computer you would buy with an additional $50 was one of the new XPS laptops then you are probably not in the market for device that is portability first.

    • Jypster
    • 12 years ago

    :… little eccentricities, too, like the control-alt-delete button …” I am really supprised that you see it that way given the target groups of the device.

    Not you codedivine, Cyril I mean

    • HisDivineShadow
    • 12 years ago

    It’ll be great when AMD shakes the Atom market up with Bobcat. With competition, I expect Intel to knock the price down on Atom or actually give the line meaningful performance upgrades more next year than they have in the yearS prior.

    • ryko
    • 12 years ago

    way to price it out of the realm of usefulness. for $50 more i can get a full fledged XPS laptop from dell with a core i5 and discrete gpu!

    i have a hard time justifying the purchase of an atom in a $300 netbook, let alone in this $800 thing. slates with atom should be no more than $400-500. i might be willing to pay $600-700 for a slate with a culv cpu though.

    • NeelyCam
    • 12 years ago

    *nevermind*

    • NeelyCam
    • 12 years ago

    Battery life?

    • codedivine
    • 12 years ago

    I believe the Ctrl-Alt-Delete is used as a shortcut to login to domains? That is why some enterprise focused systems have that option.

    Also, this thing has an Wacom active digitizer making it perphas useful for both note taking and for people who want to do some graphics work on the go (though perhaps a proper convertible with more horsepower is better for that).

    • Corrado
    • 12 years ago

    So its another netbook tablet. Still do not want.

    • 5150
    • 12 years ago

    I hope their SSD is decent. I’d rather have a HDD than a crappy SSD.

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