Report: Next, next-gen Intel chipsets to offer USB 3.0 support

Rumor has it that select desktop and notebook chipsets for AMD’s upcoming Llano platform will offer native support for USB 3.0. SuperSpeed support isn’t expected in the core-logic offerings accompanying Intel’s Sandy Bridge CPUs, which are due out early next year. If this report from DigiTimes is to be believed, USB 3.0 support will come to Intel chipsets as part of the Chief River platform.

Slated for introduction in January of 2012, Chief River is designed to accompany 22-nm Ivy Bridge CPUs. According to DigiTimes’ sources at motherboard makers, the platform will enter mass production about a year from now.

Previous rumors had pegged 2012 as a likely launch time frame for USB 3.0 goodness from Intel, but it was unclear whether that referred to support for the faster USB standard in core-logic chipsets or separate, dedicated silicon. It seems those reports were referring to the former, although there’s certainly a market for the latter, especially with numerous third-party USB 3.0 controllers still awaiting certification from the USB governing body.

Comments closed
    • sigher
    • 9 years ago

    “intel will start USB3 support by 2012”
    Well bloody duh…
    Here’s another revelation “intel CEO’s will have some lunch within 24 hours”

    • bcronce
    • 9 years ago

    According to an article from a few months back, Intel planned to release USB3.0/Sata3.0/PCIe3.0 all at the same time.

    The issue is they didn’t want to redo the logic for something that isn’t too big of an issue yet. Lots of work, little return. They wanted to just wait for all 3 specs to be out so they could knock out 3 birds with one stone.

    So expect USB3.0 when PCIe3.0 comes out, in 2012.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      That’s a bit of a weird reason since SATA 6gbps has been around for a little while, and the PCIe 3.0 support should be dependent on the CPU. They’re going to have to add it all at some point, anyways. Why not sooner rather than later?

      What it comes down to is what Intel wants – numerous, drawn out, incremental updates to differentiate a huge mess of pointless platforms, while fitting their own products’ shortcomings and getting in the way of someone else’s advantages.

      See: new sub-300MB/s Intel SSDs, lightpeak, virtually non-existent reason to upgrade based on CPU alone…

      If they do implement all three of those things at once, it’s not as if they weren’t there in some form or another beforehand. They’ll just try to paint up full integration as some sort of technological innovation once it suits their upcoming void of marketing bullet points.

        • Voldenuit
        • 9 years ago

        q[

    • Althernai
    • 9 years ago

    Are you sure Sandy Bridge doesn’t have it? The source for it not being expected in the July 7th article is Fudzilla, but Fudzilla changed their minds about a month ago:

    l[http://www.fudzilla.com/processors/item/20347-sandy-bridge-to-get-usb-30-support<]§

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      “I saw it in the National Enquirer, so it must be true!”

        • indeego
        • 9 years ago

        John Edwardsg{<.<}g

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 9 years ago

          That scene in /[

            • indeego
            • 9 years ago

            I used to plaster my walls in college with headlines from Weekly World News. Almost became a museum, people would stop by so ofteng{<.<}g

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 9 years ago

            One of the guys on my floor of the residence hall was a physics major intent on researching controllable fusion. When Ponds and Fleischman’s “Cold Fusion” discovery was a big discussion topic, I picked up a copy of the Weekly World News and the Enquirer, and I interspersed actual headlines from those two publications with glowing headlines about the cold fusion research and posted them on his board. Yes, I was a skeptic even then.

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