Report: Sandy Bridge to make up 20% of Intel’s Q1 CPU shipments

We all know Intel’s next-gen Sandy Bridge processors are due out early next year. According to DigiTimes, they’re coming in droves. Citing its usual sources at motherboard makers, the site claims that Sandy Bridge will account for 20% of Intel’s desktop CPU shipments in the first quarter of next year.

In that same quarter, Asus and Gigabyte are expected to ship a combined 10.8 million motherboards based on new 6-series chipsets. Gigabyte is already teasing its forthcoming lineup of Sandy Bridge motherboards, some of which were on display at IDF earlier this year. Asus has also been showing off a Sandy Bridge motherboard of its own—this one with a swanky UEFI BIOS.

In related news, AMD is rumored to be preparing a Bulldozer demo for this week. AMD’s new processor architecture won’t make its official debut until next year, which is also when the company’s Llano desktop APU is scheduled to arrive. Llano combines CPU cores based on AMD’s existing Phenom II architecture with a graphics component on the same die, while Bulldozer represents a fundamentally new CPU architecture. The latest schedule spun by SemiAccurate’s Charlie Demerjian pegs Llano’s arrival at the end of the second quarter. Bulldozer will reportedly be available in the same timeframe, but only in small quantities. Volume production of AMD’s truly next-gen CPU is expected is Q3.

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    • HisDivineShadow
    • 9 years ago

    I think Intel’s aggressive push of Sandy Bridge at launch suggests AMD’s upcoming CPU’s are going to be a threat and they are going to head them off before the competition can get a foothold.

    Unlike when Phenom was coming and Intel shrugged.

      • ronch
      • 9 years ago

      Or it could simply be Intel’s Tick-Tock.

      • Krogoth
      • 9 years ago

      Pretty much.

      Intel knows that they cannot lose AMD to race for first mainstream “System-on-a-chip” solution. Because, OEMs will be picking up whoever has the first platform in sufficent quantities. SOAC are the next big thing in the PC desktop world.

      It is the beginning of the end of the desktop form factor as we know it.

      • MrDigi
      • 9 years ago

      I would say it’s time to get on 32nm and away from dual chip packages to realize cost savings.

    • DrCR
    • 9 years ago

    Am I the only one that cares more about the chipset than the CPU brand?

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    Damn. Move your ass, AMD. Get those Bulldozers running! Intel’s been whoopin’ your ass for the last four years. You’d better whoop their ass this time!

    • anotherengineer
    • 9 years ago

    So anyone who wants a Sandy Bridge will need a new mobo also, hmmm I wonder if they will be expensive also, either way combine upgrade will be expensive.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      Same prices as we have now, hence the same branding. Still $200+ for a quad-core.

        • MrDigi
        • 9 years ago

        I think SB quads will start at 150 to replace the high end dual core segment. K series will be 200. Having a new socket means they don’t compete immediately with last gen sockets, and can have a manageable ramp. Only concern is if high demand will keep motherboard prices high.

    • crsh1976
    • 9 years ago

    I’m waiting for this; I’m still using an aging Core 2 Duo setup, I was going to upgrade to an i5/i7 until I read that Sandy Bridge will use new sockets. Sure am glad I didn’t build a new machine using the 1156/1366 sockets.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 9 years ago

      I kinda agree. Sad to see more sockets flooding the market when the 775 still persists.

        • ImSpartacus
        • 9 years ago

        Yeah, it’s kinda disheartening when every generation starts using a different socket.

        I’m also running a C2D (E8400). Even as a dual core, it gets the job done. I’ll probably wait quite a while before upgrading. Hardware has been moving so slowly lately.

          • indeego
          • 9 years ago

          /[<"Hardware has been moving so slowly lately. "<]/ Moore's law is almost exactly on par with what they stated ~50 years ago. My 7-zip benches confirmg{<.<}g

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 9 years ago

            You don’t exactly see that reflected in normal use, though.

            Before anyone starts complaining about software failing to take advantage of it, that’s only part of the picture. Lots of hardware has very limited application to begin with (does your laptop need 16 cores?), and lots more seems to be overlooked in favor of playing numbers games.

            The way computers as a whole are assembled needs to change some so that they can find new uses for what’s already available. We’re getting there, but the fancy new high end x86 CPUs aren’t really it, even for servers.

            • pmonti80
            • 9 years ago

            Your 7zip may confirm it. But if you have a fast Core 2 Duo (like the e8400) it’s difficult to feel the need for anything faster even for most people reading this site. A faster Graphic Card or a SSD are probably better upgrades.

            The real reason that would make me upgrade soon to sandy bridge is uefi and the promise of faster boot times. That would make me switch as soon as possible.

            • DrCR
            • 9 years ago

            Just use Grub, and mail me the money. 😉

      • Farting Bob
      • 9 years ago

      Same here, rocking my Q9300 and 2(!)GB of DDR2 (my mobo seems to hate more than 1 stick of RAM in even those on the fully compatible list) until next year where i’ll just upgrade everything. It also leaves me completely open to Intel or AMD depending on who takes my fancy (and how much my wallet screams in protest).

        • DrCR
        • 9 years ago

        l[

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 9 years ago

    My Q6600 needs replacing.

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 years ago

      I told you the other day you didn’t need to. if you’re looking to burn money, mail it to me.

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 9 years ago

        I’ll probably upgrade my pc with a new 1090T black edition and 6870. Carry over my DDR3 dual channel ram, all 8 Gb. I’ll keep my old gear and add in a bit of ram and install ubuntu and run the two systems with synergy across my 3 monitors.

          • sweatshopking
          • 9 years ago

          nope. that’s *nix blasphemy. ati/amd and *nix don’t mix. i’ve heard it 1000000 times. plus. what the F do you need a 6870 for on linux? i’ll send you my 4850, which is already overkill to play tux racing.

            • DrCR
            • 9 years ago

            Sometimes you just got to step back and let a guy learn the hardway.

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      Nah – just get an SSD.

    • indeego
    • 9 years ago

    We held off on a 3-year replacement cycle for Sandy Bridge. I guess Intel wins in the end on margin anywayg{<...<}g

    • ModernPrimitive
    • 9 years ago

    Twould be nice to see AMD with the performance crown next time around, but thinking I’m dreaming. I too would like to see Intel drop one of their top two sockets in favor of one, but I’m notpicking over something I may never buy anyway 😛

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      I have to ask – what is the performance crown going to be for?

      Every high end CPU will be in the 3.8 GHz range, with an integrated memory controller, PCIe controller, gobs of memory bandwidth, several MB of high speed cache per core, and more cores to go around than you will likely need, all running on about 1.0v.

      What’s left to differentiate them other than extremely small, nitpicky differences?

      Intel and AMD will continue trading blows in the wonderful world of bazillion core servers for years to come, but this next round of high end CPUs is more like the homogenization of desktops as we know them than an evolution.

      On the PC side of things, the real competition from here on out will likely shift to laptop battery life. There’s certainly still room for improvement there.

        • NeelyCam
        • 9 years ago

        I hate agreeing with you, but I must.

        • smilingcrow
        • 9 years ago

        I don’t personally care who wins the performance crown but it can significantly impact a companies pricing strategy if their fastest CPU only matches the performance of their competitors $200 mid range chip. That’s what happened to AMD in the past and it negatively impacted their profits margins.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 9 years ago

          They’re competing against one of the world’s largest corporations. I somehow doubt that AMD feels too bad when they get to sell pieces of sand for $200, in a small part of their business that has historically reused server parts, while they’re still selling the actual server CPUs for $1,000+.

          There is way too big of a deal made about profit margins on high end desktop parts. The almighty Intel yet again only expects for 2% of desktop CPUs to be Core i7s.

            • smilingcrow
            • 9 years ago

            “There is way too big of a deal made about profit margins on high end desktop parts.”

            I was thinking more in terms of the fact that if your high end part is only $200 then the knock on affect is that the pricing for you mid and low range parts is also compromised so your overall margin is lowered.

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 9 years ago

            The low prices are, I think, also a reflection of the downwards trend in computer prices, which is itself due to diminishing interest in higher performance.

            • smilingcrow
            • 9 years ago

            “I somehow doubt that AMD feels too bad when they get to sell pieces of sand for $200”

            Well the company nearly went down the pan so I guess they could have done with selling their sand for even more when they hit very hard times. Good to see them back on track in the sand business but I wonder if they make more money in their cement subsidiary these days!

            • Axel
            • 9 years ago

            The bottom line is that AMD had to resort to selling off majority interest in their fabs to survive. This now puts them at a potentially huge disadvantage going forward, should GlobalFoundries decide to invest more in bulk silicon rather than processes optimized for AMD CPUs. Selling their CPUs at higher prices would, without question, have allowed AMD to delay the sale of the fabs and maybe even hang on to them.

        • ronch
        • 9 years ago

        Building a fast CPU which can address all market segments doesn’t only mean gaining respect for having technological prowess, it means you don’t have to price your fastest CPUs way below your competition just to sell them. It means your competition doesn’t have the option of squeezing your prices and profits at the bottom end of the market when they want to. And profits mean filling your war chest so your company stays alive off its own bank account on a rainy day when things don’t turn out right and your next CPU design fails to impress.

        The argument that AMD CPUs do just fine is a weak one. Having a high end CPU lineup means AMD can sell you a high end product if you need it and can afford it, a mid range product if that’s what you want, and a low end product (Duron, Sempron, etc.) if your budget restricts you. And, as I mentioned, this way, Intel can’t squeeze them at the bottom. The reason why AMD’s prices are all so crowded together is that they have no choice but to play below the $300 field. Because that’s where Intel only wants them to play. And if Intel lowers prices AMD has no choice but to further shrink that $300 field, shrinking profits as well.

        In the cutthroat x86 CPU industry with Intel as your competitor falling behind almost certainly means going out of business. Cyrix, IDT, etc. all went this way before going out of business. Falling behind was the last thing they ever did.

          • MrDigi
          • 9 years ago

          Intel has pushed AMD mostly to under $100 price points for desktop CPUs. SB to easily push X6s to below $150.

    • dpaus
    • 9 years ago

    Presumably, this means a /[

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      I think 2011 will be bargain hunter’s heaven. Athlon/PhenomIIs and Lynnfields/Westmeres/Nehalems are perfectly capable CPUs and will sell for peanuts.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 9 years ago

    Intels socket scheme for desktops is so convaluted I don’t want to buy intel agian till they consolidate to 1 socket. The current 4 is horrible.

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 years ago

      It makes sense. You should be able to handle 4 different things. Can you count? processors SAY which socket they work on. Don’t worry about upgrades. Intel doesn’t want you to. buy a new one. It’s not that complicated.

      • Sanctusx2
      • 9 years ago

      It is convoluted, but for a lot of people it doesn’t really matter. While I consider myself an enthusiast, I’ve never upgraded just a CPU. You either get left with a waste of money sitting around, or you ebay it for a fraction of what you paid for. About the same time you’re upgrading your CPU, you also usually upgrade your graphics card too, and vice versa so that they are properly paired.

      I usually just spring a bit extra for a whole new computer, get a new, quieter case and better power supply, more mobo features. This way at least I have a spare computer to give to a family, friend, or turn into a server of some sort, instead of a pile of parts(of which I have many from other projects).

      That’s not even to mention Joe consumer or Mr. Corporate, who care even less about upgrading just a CPU.

      Keeping the same socket would be great for keeping motherboard costs down, but other than that it’s not a big deal.

        • NeelyCam
        • 9 years ago

        Yeah, every time I upgrade, I end up building a whole new rig. Even hard drives need to be upgraded to newer/faster/quieter versions. The only things I’ve reused lately are mouse/keyoboard and maybe a DVD burner (even that had to be upgraded to a SATA one..)

        The old, practically complete system goes to a friend or family.

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 9 years ago

        I just don’t understand why they still design for and support 775, they have no reason to have more than 2 new sockets, one for tripple channel one for dual channel. No reason for the extra. At this point. I just like simplicity, I would have already gotten a i7 a year ago if I new That I could have dropped a sandy bridge 6 core in that socket when it came out. Now that their is all this speculation about exclussivity I’m just gonna get the 1090T black from AMD and be done with it.

          • sweatshopking
          • 9 years ago

          don’t buy that. it won’t be bulldozer compatible. then you’ll complain about that.

            • kamikaziechameleon
            • 9 years ago

            Didn’t hear that They where doing that, at any rate their Mobos are cheaper to replace.

            • khands
            • 9 years ago

            Bulldozer has been said to be AM3 compatible several times, don’t listen to ssk, he’s a troll.

            • sweatshopking
            • 9 years ago

            ACTUALLY, they have. You shouldn’t argue with me about that kind of stuff. I’m always right:

            §[<http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/cpu/display/20100826225852_Desktop_Bulldozer_Processors_Will_Require_New_Platforms_AMD.html<]§ You're the Troll. :P

            • khands
            • 9 years ago

            If you hadn’t come back with proof I wouldn’t have believed you.

            • sweatshopking
            • 9 years ago

            and you would have continued in your ignorance. You should never doubt me. I’m a king for a reason.

            • sweatshopking
            • 9 years ago

            poop hands.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 9 years ago

            They still haven’t made the socket compatibility with Bulldozer completely clear. It doesn’t have an integrated GPU, so it doesn’t absolutely have to require a new one, and it’s compatible with the current server sockets, as well, so there was some sort of planning ahead there.

            What I am wondering about is how the heck the integrated PCIe controllers, and down the road, southbridges, will work even with the server boards?!?

        • Vaughn
        • 9 years ago

        I agree with you 100%.

        I use to be strickly AMD and jumped ship when Nehalem showed up.

        When I build rigs now I expect 3 years minimum use out of it, obviously with a GPU upgrade in that time frame and possibly more memory. So by the time i’m ready to upgrade I need to buy a new board anyways. The newest processors at that time will require it for me to fully benefit. So at end of the day its not as big of a deal as most make it out to be.

        Backwards compability is nice for sockets but when you tend to keep machines for extended periods of time you are forced to upgrade anyways.

        Everyone that thought they would be putting a bulldozer in their AM3 is wrong. Cause now AMD says you need AM3+ and that’s just how things roll in this industry.

      • evilpaul
      • 9 years ago

      Bring back Socket 7!! Then we can use either AMD or Intel CPUs on the same motherboard!

      Sarcasm aside, who’s upgrading their CPUs without getting a new motherboard anymore? Unless you buy a very low end single or dual core CPU then there’s not much to upgrade to. The flagship CPUs start expensive and usually don’t drop enough to end up being a better upgrade than a new platform and CPU/Mobo/RAM.

      • ronch
      • 9 years ago

      Somehow I think it’s Intel’s way of keeping mobo makers happy. Need to upgrade from a Pentium 4 to a Core 2 Duo? We’ll sell you an LGA 775 board right now! How about an i3? We have just the LGA 1156 board for you! Need more power? Get an i7 with an LGA 1366 board from us! More sockets mean the board makers have more stuff to sell.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 9 years ago

        …or so Intel can sell more $40 southbridges at the “chipset” price, which is what they did with socket 1156 boards.

        Look at the prices of P55s. Most brands don’t sell one below $100. I’m not so sure that makes motherboard makers happy. To sell a “normal” priced board for the target market of $100-ish CPUs, it drives their slim margins down even further, or just makes them look like a poor value.

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