Intel touts 35 tablet design wins

Atom-powered slates are on their way—a lot of them. As CNet News reports, Intel CEO Paul Otellini provided a brief update about the subject at the Barclays Capital 2010 Global Technology Conference, revealing that Intel has "over 35" design wins in the pipeline for the first half of 2011. Those design wins will include tablets from Acer, Dell, Lenovo, Toshiba, Asus, Fujitsu, Cisco, and others.

Interestingly, the PowerPoint slide posted by CNet shows Intel hyping up design wins based not just on Windows and its MeeGo platform, but also Android. Otellini reportedly explained that Froyo (2.2) and Honeycomb (3.0) versions of Android will show up on Atom-based slates. Android seems to me like it could end up as the best iOS competitor in the tablet space, so support is a big deal for Intel. The question, I suppose, is whether Atom- or ARM-based Android slates will be more compelling.

CNet News says Otellini also talked about the nitty-gritty side of things a little, noting that both Oak Trail and Moorestown Atom platforms will make their way into next year’s slates. Oak Trail, which isn’t out yet, will power Windows-based slates and offer a "very solid, high-performance, low-power version of Atom." Meanwhile, Moorestown, which includes the Atom Z600 series, will power thinner and lighter tablets with longer battery life.

Comments closed
    • anotherengineer
    • 9 years ago

    Meh

    Still won’t be buying a tablet ever.

      • indeego
      • 9 years ago

      We know, because you use ACAD and autoplant. Those applications could never be used with portability in mind. I was just talking to my pseudo-wife (Interior Designer that uses Autocad heavily) and she never visits sites where it would be handy to show a client what interiors would look like, in real-time, on the fly, saving ten+ hours of back-and-forth billing potential for clientsg{<.<}g Good thing the 980X keeps her chained at home. And the chain, of course.

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        lol. how did you swing that? My wife tried to kill me when i brought up a chain! she simply refuses to wear one!

          • poulpy
          • 9 years ago

          Sure won’t work if you tell it to her, best to do that while the beast is asleep.

    • dpaus
    • 9 years ago

    Good to see Intel getting some design wins while they can; those Brazos chips aren’t far off.

    • Scrotos
    • 9 years ago

    I like Ars’ take on it:

    §[<http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2010/12/intel-talks-up-tablets-phones-corporate-piggy-bank-raids.ars<]§ The other part about it where Intel's buying back stock instead of reinvesting in other stuff. Though I guess when you're top dog you don't need to change what you're doing, maybe. Maybe they should have thrown that money at Larrabee instead.

    • thesmileman
    • 9 years ago

    A cisco tablet? Maybe for video conferencing or part of a phone.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 9 years ago

    “35 tablet designs lose”

    Android tablets with x86 CPUs, Chrome netbooks with x86 CPUs…ugh, please make it stop.

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      Why? Don’t you like superior products?

        • Kurotetsu
        • 9 years ago

        Go read one of his many, MANY rants about the power usage and heat of x86 chips (trust me, they’re easy to find, its almost a once a day thing).

          • NeelyCam
          • 9 years ago

          That’s because he’s confused and thinks that somehow ARM is inherently far superior, and x86 chips are bound to be a horribly inefficient forever.

          Intel never had such a need to focus on power consumption (idle and load), but now they do, so the results will be different from those in the past. And I predict Intel’s process advantage will take care of any tiny architectural difference there might be. Soon we’ll know if this is the case.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 9 years ago

            The only confused person here is the one who thinks that the “process advantage” and “tiny architectural differences” of one chip have any real significance compared to the platforms as a whole.

            ARM CPUs aren’t “superior” and I never said they were. Their potential platform implementations, which are numerous and easily adaptable to the particular device, are.

            • poulpy
            • 9 years ago

            NeelyCam has been quite clear on his feelings for Intel platforms in general and especially for the upcoming ARM competitors so I would take this with a pinch of salt anyway.

            There are differences in micro-architectures, designs and process technology and denying them is trying to simplify the problem to me, but we’ve discussed that one to death so IMO there’s only waiting to do and see how it pans out..

            Intel is a very efficient beast in the desktop/server market, partly thanks to the x86 legacy leverage, but it also suffered failures/cancellations/lost of interest in -say- the discreet GPU market. So Intel doesn’t always equate to success story, better process or not (also they may want to prioritize access to the latest processes to desktop/servers).

            Baseline is competition is good for us customers, so bring it on!

            • sweatshopking
            • 9 years ago

            saying “we have a better process, so our chips are inherently better” doesn’t make a lot of sense to me. I would think, if we’re looking at comparing 2 chips, and discussing efficiency, and heat, I’d want chips made on the same node. If we’re saying Intel’s x86 chip is better, then I’d want to see that. Saying a 40 nm chip is better than a 90nm chip is easy. it doesn’t mean that the chip is actually any better, just made on a newer process.

    • blastdoor
    • 9 years ago

    Android fragmentation continues, now with multiple CPU architectures. Will there be fat binaries for apps? Will that process be seamless for developers?

      • WillBach
      • 9 years ago

      I don’t usually comment while I’m at work, but you may find this interesting: §[<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalvik_(software)<]§

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 9 years ago

        Amazing! Thanks for posting.

        • sschaem
        • 9 years ago

        Windows does have MSIL and does really well at abstracting processor architecture.
        §[<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Intermediate_Language<]§ DirectCompute (and shader) take care of the GPU side... You also have universal runtime like AIR. (Abstract not only the CPU/GPU but also the OS)

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