OCZ adds three 80 Plus Gold-rated PSUs

That new line of 80 Plus Gold-certified OCZ power supplies we saw at the Consumer Electronics Show has officially launched. Dubbed the ZX Series, the lineup includes 850W, 1000W, and 1250W models, all fully modular and rated to operate at 92% efficiency under a "typical" load.

I’m not being hyperbolic about the "fully modular" part, by the way. Unlike typical modular PSUs (and all of OCZ’s prior designs), the ZX units don’t have pre-wired ATX and auxiliary 12V power cables, so the bare units are completely cable-free:

Along with a generous helping of modular cables, OCZ outfits ZX Series PSUs with single 12V rails, "ultra-quiet" 140-mm ball-bearing fans, and five-year warranty coverage. All three units have also received CrossFire and SLI certification, so they won’t catch on fire if you try to hook ’em up to a pair of Radeons or GeForces—that’s always good.

Comments closed
    • willyolio
    • 9 years ago

    pffft. a 1250 watt PSU with only 6 PCI-E power plugs? How can I possibly do quad-crossfire/SLI with that dinky little thing?

      • continuum
      • 9 years ago

      Agreed. What’s the point again?!?!??!

    • indeego
    • 9 years ago

    Why trust them since they abandoned the memory market?

    • Bauxite
    • 9 years ago

    Who is(are) the actual OEM(s) of these, seasonic or someone else? Usually you can figure it out from either the detailed 80 plus docs or the FCC/UL badges on the units.

    • potatochobit
    • 9 years ago

    I love OCZ SSDs but they should stop making PSUs
    there are too many players and Corsair and Antec are tough competition

      • Dashak
      • 9 years ago

      Corsair > Antec

        • insulin_junkie72
        • 9 years ago

        When you start getting into this price range, I’d go Seasonic > Corsair.

        Would love to have one of the X-Series Seasonics. Fan doesn’t even spin under most normal loads, too. Nice!

        While some Corsairs in the past have been Seasonics, they play swap-the-OEM rather often (Antec is often guilty, as well).

      • flip-mode
      • 9 years ago

      But these look like nice PSUs. I can’t complain about them being in the market when they’re bringing good products, even if others are making good products.

    • jalex3
    • 9 years ago

    after them ditching ram, i would no longer trust them with power supplies.

      • Trymor
      • 9 years ago

      What does one have to do with the other?

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 9 years ago

    1200 watt or higher, or else you a chump!

    • UberGerbil
    • 9 years ago

    CPUs and GPUs are getting more power efficient; meanwhile, PSUs push past a kilowatt. I realize there are systems that actually use 500+W at peak (and therefore need PSUs rated at twice that for max efficiency), but I’d rather see more modular, hi-efficiency PSU choices in the 400W-700W range. In fact, you could argue that modular is [i<]more[/i<] important for the lower-wattage PSUs, because they're typically powering mATX boards in smaller cases. If you're building a monster KW-eating multi-GPU Chalchiuhtotolin-box, you probably have plenty of space to stuff extra cables, too.

      • Kurotetsu
      • 9 years ago

      These things are 80 Plus Gold certified which, according to wiki, they maintain an efficiency of 87% even at 20% load.

      [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/80_PLUS#Efficiency_level_certifications[/url<] That is pretty damn awesome, especially compared to my current HX620 which I believe only gets around 82% efficiency at load. I would gladly ignore the high wattage to get efficiency at low loads like that. Its not like the PSU constantly draws that much anyway.

        • UberGerbil
        • 9 years ago

        But each marginal percent matters less when you’re using less power to begin with. That 5% difference is significant when the load is 500W; significantly less so when it’s 200W.

          • indeego
          • 9 years ago

          I aim for low power at work and then everyone has 1500Watt heaters under their desks. head/wall.

            • UberGerbil
            • 9 years ago

            Well, that’s why I never paid a whole lot of attention to power efficiency on my home machines: I have electric heat, so (for seven or eight months a year) I’m burning electricity either way in my office. The only question is whether it does some kind of computing work before it warms my toes. And at under a dime a KWh, it’s not going to make that much difference to my pocket anyway.

            But for HTPC builds, and other ~SFF uses, it’s not about the absolute power use [i<]per se[/i<] so much as power density in small volume cases.

        • Lans
        • 9 years ago

        I wouldn’t entirely write off the 1250W model if it has pretty good 10% load efficiency also (not required for certification but there are PSUs on the market that do quite well at that load). 125W DC is still a little more than idle (AC?) for “typical systems”, which I consider as the following:

        [url<]https://techreport.com/articles.x/20293/13[/url<] On the other hand, price would probably deter me more than efficiency. I figured 650W is roughly [color=red]the most optimal for system I am building[/color] and bought an Seasonic X650 after reading the following review: [url<]http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story2&reid=169[/url<] I am very happy to confirm that I am getting about ~88% efficiency at ~10% load (at least according to published efficiency numbers of my old Seasonic S12 330W and respectively AC readings). I hope the trend is to [s<]also[/s<] get higher efficiency at lower loads also (especially with recent trend of low idle power). 🙂 [color=red]EDIT: Clarified to avoid confusion and tried to fix typos. And I give up on trying to get red text to show up on my browser...[/color]

        • stdRaichu
        • 9 years ago

        20% of 1250W is 250W, which is the most I’ve ever gotten my system to draw (2600K and a radeon 5770, preceded by an i7 860 and the same 5770 which pulled about the same) whilst playing a game and doing a video encode across all four cores. Even a 350W PSU would have had plenty of headroom.

        The problem with these high-wattage efficient PSU’s is that most people who use them will often be operating in the 5-10% load, where the PSU’s are least efficient. Since lower wattage PSU’s of similar efficiency will have smaller boundaries, they’re more efficient at the lower end.

        Summary: PSU’s over 450W are a waste of money and energy unless you’re running multiple GPU system or are doing crazy overclocking (in my experience a tiny minority even of gamers). I’ve been using a 430W seasonic S12 in my main rig for years. Next will probably be the M12II 520W, and only because they don’t make any that are rated lower.

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      Yes. The 80+ certificate should simply exclude anything more than 800W or so.

      How can anyone honestly say that you’re PC is “energy efficient” if it has an 800W PSU?

      PicoPSU FTW!

        • esc_in_ks
        • 9 years ago

        A PC with an 800W power supply doesn’t necessarily draw any more power than the same components with a 300W power supply. That’s just what the power supply can deliver, and doesn’t necessarily imply that it uses more power. In fact, if it’s a quality 800W unit versus a junk 300W unit, it might draw less power.

        I have an Atom D510 based NAS/server with a 300W 80+ bronze SuperMicro badged power supply that draws only 25W at the plug.

          • NeelyCam
          • 9 years ago

          I have an i5-670 based desktop with a 150W PicoPSU that draws only 21W at the plug.

            • esc_in_ks
            • 9 years ago

            That’s insane!

            What other components are in the system? I’m guessing an SSD with no spinning disks and integrated graphics? That’s impressively low for an i5 system.

            In my defense for my ridiculously high power draw of 25W, that is under load and with 2 x WD 2 TB Green drives. 🙂

            • NeelyCam
            • 9 years ago

            Fair point… mine is idling with the HDD spun down.

            • Lans
            • 9 years ago

            I don’t believe that… at least not 21W AC… If you would please kindly provide a link (EDIT: or you components as esc_in_ks is asking)! 🙂

            Closet I can find (in a few minutes) is Core i5-661 with SPCR says it uses 31W [b<]DC[/b<] so even with a picoPSU (which has efficiency of low 80s), you can't get it down to 21W AC (mid 30s maybe, probably closer to high 30s). [url<]http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1013-page5.html[/url<] Pretty damn good but no where near 21W AC... For another point of comparison, it takes a SU 2300 or Atom to hit AC in the low 20s: [url<]http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1105-page5.html[/url<]

            • NeelyCam
            • 9 years ago

            Details:

            [url<]http://www.silentpcreview.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=58735[/url<] The post says it is idling at 22W, but I was able to shave off one last watt by lowering memory voltage (could not hit my target of 20W, though..). I could've hit 20W if I used an Intel board... next time I'm seriously considering that.

            • NeelyCam
            • 9 years ago

            [quote<]Closet I can find (in a few minutes) is Core i5-661 with SPCR says it uses 31W DC so even with a picoPSU (which has efficiency of low 80s), you can't get it down to 21W AC (mid 30s maybe, probably closer to high 30s). [url<]http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1013-page5.html[/url<][/quote<] That 31W is with a VelociRaptor and an NVidia discrete graphics card. Look at the first table on the page; it shows 18W system idle power (with PSU efficiency calibrated out).. with PicoPSU+brick efficiency of about 83-85%, 21W is right on the money.

            • Lans
            • 9 years ago

            I stand corrected… was rushing a bit out the door this morning.

            Yes the 31W is with a GeForce 9400GT and is 18W with IGP and “two sticks of memory, a notebook hard drive, idle Blu-ray drive, keyboard and mouse” (that setup would 21W to 22W AC with your listed efficiency). I guess reason why you are not getting lower reading with a mATX board vs. ATX board is because you have and SSD and HDD. Also I guess is too much to ask underclocking would make power consumption even lower…

            Pretty impressive! I might need to look into a picoPSU! 🙂

        • anotherengineer
        • 9 years ago

        Better yet, run pure DC, no eddy currents, hysteresis, power factor, harmonics, voltage ripple etc.

        The problem is getting it since everything is AC 🙁

        I guess you could get a car battery and some big ass zener diodes for 3.3, 5 and 12V still have to charge the battery though.

        I suppose the easiest way to boost efficiency would be to plug in the PSU to 230V or get them to make a PSU for 208V 3-phase, they should be able to squeeze 93% out of that, but then comes a point of diminishing returns.

        I wonder if Seasonic is the OEM for these PSU’s??

          • UberGerbil
          • 9 years ago

          Well, most PSUs these days are designed to also work with 220-240V common outside N. America — you no longer even need to fiddle with a little switch on the thing, just get a different plug.

          Hmmm, I have 208V running all my heat at home. And of course there’s a couple of appliance circuits. I wonder….

          • just brew it!
          • 9 years ago

          [quote<]I guess you could get a car battery and some big ass zener diodes for 3.3, 5 and 12V still have to charge the battery though.[/quote<] Zener diode regulators have horrendous efficiency, and aren't at all practical for high load applications like the rails of a PC PSU. Since they are shunt regulators, any current that isn't being utilized by the load gets shunted (dumped) through the zener diode and associated dropping resistor, where they are converted directly to heat. Your zeners would need to be capable of dissipating hundreds of watts (worst case they will need to dissipate the full wattage of the PSU), with monster heatsinks and fans to keep them from self-destructing in a burst of flame and smoke. Furthermore the efficiency of the PSU would be only ~50% at half load, and would approach 0% for lighter loads.

            • anotherengineer
            • 9 years ago

            Exactly. The more stuff you add the more efficiency you lose. I suppose you could make a controler and use some SCR’s or a DC-DC converter, but there will still be losses.

            I suppose the ideal would be a 3.3v, 5v and 12v battery 🙂

            Either way, PC PSU’s have come a LONG way in the past 8 years!!!

            But these high power PSU’s are cool, but even more cool would be a 250W or 300W passive gold modular, cmon seasonic you can do it.

            • just brew it!
            • 9 years ago

            [quote<]Exactly. The more stuff you add the more efficiency you lose.[/quote<] You've got it backwards. A zener based regulator is at its [i<]least[/i<] efficient at low loads. [quote<]I suppose you could make a controler and use some SCR's or a DC-DC converter, but there will still be losses.[/quote<] This is exactly what the switching regulators in a normal PSU do today. [quote<]I suppose the ideal would be a 3.3v, 5v and 12v battery :)[/quote<] ...and as you've already acknowledged, you would still need to charge those batteries from an AC source. The charging circuit (and the batteries themselves) introduce additional complexity, drive up cost, create new failure modes (worn out batteries), and make the overall system less efficient. I'm not sure why you're so hung up on AC losses; everything you've proposed actually makes matters worse.

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