Report: Steam generated $1 billion in sales in 2010

While gorging on today’s helping of shortbread, I stumbled upon an interesting story claiming that Valve’s Steam content delivery service raked in nearly one billion dollars in 2010. As a privately held company, Valve doesn’t release such figures to the public. The report is based on the work of analysts at Forecasting and Analyzing Digital Entertainment (FADE).

According to FADE’s report, Steam generated revenues of $970 million last year and pulled in a whopping $213 million in December alone. Steam was brimming with discount deals over the holidays, and I made more than a few impulse purchases. Looks like I wasn’t alone.

Valve didn’t really have any big releases of its own this year, but the company still published seven of the top 10 games, at least by volume. Lest you think that Valve’s own wares dominate the service, the list of top ten games by revenue is littered with titles from Activision, EA, 2K Games, Bethesda, and THQ. Perhaps even more interesting, at least for those of us who enjoy more casual arcade titles, is the fact that over 180 games are said to have achieved at least $1 million in sales. Steam seems to do a pretty good job of promoting smaller games produced by independent developers.

I wasn’t a huge fan of Steam when it was first introduced, but the service has morphed into by far the best game delivery platform on the PC. The fact that titles are so frequently—and aggressively—discounted is quite a nice bonus, as well.

Comments closed
    • paulWTAMU
    • 9 years ago

    I wish they’d put out their financial statements, and sales figures for the top 10 games–I have a hunch it’d make the “PC gaming is dead” crowd shut up, and would probably be good for some jaw dropping amazement.

    • Arclight
    • 9 years ago

    A company that knows what’s up. They deserve every cent.

    • lethal
    • 9 years ago

    Steam has pretty much trained me to almost never buy anything at release. And it’s awesome. I’m pretty sure almost every game I’ve bought had at least a 50% discount.

    • bdwilcox
    • 9 years ago

    This sounds like a bunch of hot air. /rimshot

    • Code:[M]ayhem
    • 9 years ago

    More proof positive that the stupid American public will pay money for DRM laden trash….

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 9 years ago

      Meanwhile, I contributed to both humble bundles, own a large amount of games from GOG, and purchase games like Amnesia off their website.

      • bcronce
      • 9 years ago

      only trash around here is what you type.

      If you want to get a point across, go take a communication’s class.

        • Anomymous Gerbil
        • 9 years ago

        Unintentional irony? Beautiful!

        • Code:[M]ayhem
        • 9 years ago

        What’s the matter n00b got lost on your way to [T]ard|OCP???

      • Firestarter
      • 9 years ago

      Hey it’s our favourite [M] troll!

      • Palek
      • 9 years ago

      I must object to the factual inaccuracy of your chauvinistic statement and insist that you also include us, the stupid Asian public.

      I expect you will be hearing from the stupid European public, as well.

        • Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
        • 9 years ago

        Indeed you shall!

        In fact, I shall point out that it was Ubisoft, Europe’s largest game publisher who had the ingenious Idea, that in order to keep players from copying a game, it was best to keep them from playing it altogether.

        I think we stupid European gamers just wish to return to childhood, where parents told us when and how we could play with our toys.

    • ShadowTiger
    • 9 years ago

    I am wary of Steam ever since my game was rejected… and they gave no reason… and it would cost them nothing to add 1 more game to their store. I would even pay for their bandwidth if they gave me the chance to talk to them.

    I have no idea why they rejected my game… maybe because its Free To Play with microtransactions… maybe because they didn’t think it would sell enough… it doesn’t make sense since all they have to do is create a little web page for me and make profit from then on.

    Impulse at least gave me feedback and I know where I stand with them. Impulse is much better for Indie developers… hopefully they will get enough users to give Steam competition (they have been growing rapidly so it could happen)

      • KilgoreTrout
      • 9 years ago

      I can think of lots of reasons for them to reject your game, even regardless of its quality. They could probably do you the favor of stating that reason to you, though.

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 years ago

      WHEN ARE YOU GOING TO TELL US WHAT YOUR GAME IS. YOU SAID IT WAS A CARD GAME, HOW ABOUT A BETA INVITE?!!? YOU KNOW I’M THE BEST OPINION EVER. I DON’T HAVE AN OPINION. I AM AN OPINION.

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 9 years ago

    One of Steam’s biggest accomplishments was brainwashing the masses into believing that their service isn’t DRM, or that their DRM isn’t intrusive, or even beneficial as a service. Ironically, it’s all been lies and propaganda since day one, as there are many games that have the standard DRM installed on top of steam, and offline mode is still a joke.
    Impulse is a superior delivery service in which you don’t have to run it in the background to play your games.
    The only reason I purchase anything from steam at all is the sales, and I never pay full price for digital content, because if I’m paying upwards of 50$ I want a physical box and manual that I can read.

    Of course we have plenty of zombies who can’t see the forest for the trees, and will therefore defend Steam since they have an emotional investment in the service, when in reality there really isn’t anything to defend. Steam is DRM, and bad DRM at that.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 9 years ago

      I would point out that impulse is a good program despite all the severe glitches that frequent the community tools.

      Steam and impulse are both awesome, steam tends to be slightly better in that in has more exclusive content and better community tools.

      I don’t think steams DRM effects my life negatively in comparison with the features I gain for using it. I would have to say the biggest set back for impulse is that it has very few games that can take advantage of it.

      I would challenge impulse to do what steam did, provide more. More games, more community, more user tools.

        • l33t-g4m3r
        • 9 years ago

        I agree, except that I don’t know how much of Impulse’s catalog actually depends on them.

        As for negative effects of steam’s drm, it’s not non-existent, just overlooked. Offline mode is still terrible, and if I want to play quake2 in widescreen I can’t, because steam overwrites the files I install into the folder, keeping me from modding the game. I’ve also had to delete the ClientRegistry.blob multiple times this past year because the software is buggy and screws itself up. Gift’s I’ve given people have never shown up in their steam account. There are plenty of things that have gone wrong with steam over the years, it’s just that people have been conditioned to overlook them, like you said.
        I, on the other hand don’t share that mindset. The positives don’t outweigh the negatives, since I don’t weigh them on the same scale. DRM is DRM no matter how polished the [s<]turd[/s<] service is.

          • Jambe
          • 9 years ago

          The positives don’t outweigh the negatives [b<]for you[/b<]. For the three million or so daily users of the service, they apparently do. I've had the .blob issue a few times - oh noes it took ten seconds to close steam, delete the file and restart it! My Gifts & Guest Passes window shows 58 gifts, 40 of which are "redeemed" and the others are "unsent". There are two times in my memory when Steam's servers were down for maintenance/upgrades and I didn't bother to go offline beforehand so I was without my games for a few hours in the morning. I regularly play my Steam edition of Torchlight in offline mode (on my travel laptop) and I've never had a problem with it. *shrug* Perhaps your standards are just higher than mine are or I'm luckier than the average Steam user (I'd wager it's the former). All of the 137 games on my main account were bought at a discount - many 75% or more. Those few minor inconveniences are definitely outweighed by the savings and the convenience of the service, which is especially notable with the smaller games I play more regularly (they download in just a few minutes).

      • cegras
      • 9 years ago

      How is Steam DRM bad? You didn’t even give one reason.

        • l33t-g4m3r
        • 9 years ago

        Ha, ha. That’s almost funny.
        Protip: everything he said was a lie.

          • PenGun
          • 9 years ago

          Sure it is and you don’t even know why. Steam works very well for me and most other people too..

          Look at me I’m a zombie. Grraaagh. 😉

      • ludi
      • 9 years ago

      The entire industry was moving toward DRM before Steam showed up. You wouldn’t eliminate DRM in the alt-history were Steam wasn’t here. Instead, you would have two hundred unique versions of DRM that regularly break themselves and each other. How is that better?

      • ET3D
      • 9 years ago

      The masses don’t know what DRM is. Even people who do know what DRM is and even those who dislike it just don’t care that much. That’s why it’s still here.

      You’re also a good example how even people who strongly dislike DRM are willing to live with it. You say you prefer games in physical boxes, and these typically come with a lot more invasive DRM measures (in terms of the PC) than Steam. You also buy on Steam when the price is right. In short you recognise that DRM isn’t the end of the world.

      BTW, way to go on being one of the few people who actually read manuals.

        • njsutorius
        • 9 years ago

        LOL at this person who reads the manuals

      • derFunkenstein
      • 9 years ago

      It isn’t that it’s “not DRM”. It’s that it’s “DRM I can certainly live with that provides additional benefits”. Auto game updates, super-low prices, unlimited installations (unless the publisher tacks on extra DRM), and a healthy community are all worth having to log into Steam one time on a machine.

    • tejas84
    • 9 years ago

    God Bless Steam and Gabe Newell and God Bless America…

    PC gaming is alive and well. Hear me Epic and Ubisoft you douches??

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 years ago

      ok…. crazy man…. we might have something to fight about now….

    • NeronetFi
    • 9 years ago

    I have been using Steam since “The Orange Box” and I have to say it is the best. I have about 132 games through steam.

    I just wish they would get the old Legacy of Kain series

      • RobbyBob
      • 9 years ago

      I’ve been using Steam since they forced it on the release of CS 1.6. It really sucked back then, and I couldn’t find a reason for why I should be forced to use it.

      It has come a long way since then.

    • TurtlePerson2
    • 9 years ago

    That could translate to a significant profit. I have a feeling that their margin is probably just as good as retail.

    • I.S.T.
    • 9 years ago

    [url<]http://news.bigdownload.com/2011/02/03/study-claims-steam-generated-970-million-in-revenue-in-2010/[/url<]

    • yogibbear
    • 9 years ago

    And they deserve every penny!

      • KamikaseRider
      • 9 years ago

      Yes they do. I couldn’t agree more.

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 9 years ago

    Look around, all the games are being developed for the consoles, even if they sell well on PC, they are still targeted at consoles. We are getting half assed ports. PC gaming is dead.

      • Peffse
      • 9 years ago

      1 billion dollars dead!

        • ludi
        • 9 years ago

        I could live well on that kind of dead!

        • Kurotetsu
        • 9 years ago

        To be fair, he’s not arguing that PC games don’t make money. He’s arguing that there are very few games that are actually made with a gaming PC in mind.

          • indeego
          • 9 years ago

          Every ecosystem goes through evolution. If/when PC gaming catches up again, and it’s revenue generating, we’ll be seeing the “death” of the console.

          Far more likely is we’ll see gaming go completely mobile, and games will be projected from our mobile devices/into eye-sockets/other mechanism so that dependance on platforms that are static like consoles are outdated.

          Both PC’s and consoles will be outdated for most gaming in the lovely 5 year timeframe I just made up.

            • BoBzeBuilder
            • 9 years ago

            First, where is your green dot?
            Second, what?
            I’d make that a 25 year timeframe if I were you.

            • indeego
            • 9 years ago

            1. Don’t mock me.
            1b. Try and make a Green Dot.
            2. Let’s compromise. 6 years.

            • ImSpartacus
            • 9 years ago

            How about arcades, are we still waiting for their evolution?

            PC gaming is too expensive and complicated for the layman. He wants a box that just works. He wants to play on a couch with his friends, not in a chair alone.

            If there’s one thing we see everywhere, it’s that simple wins. Simple beats everything. You can charge more for simple.

            We see this in the iOS/Android groaning. It’s nearly the same situation in PC/Console gaming. PC gaming is superior, but it’s not simple.

      • yogibbear
      • 9 years ago

      STALKER
      Risen
      Dragon Age
      Dragon Knight Saga
      Amnesia: The Dark Descent
      Wings of Prey
      GOG.com
      Cryostasis

      I’m sure there’s others. Can’t think of them right now.

      Though i do agree that the major publishers are giving PC gamers the shaft. Increased prices, limited/no access to the same DLC as consoles, no support, crap multiplayer vs. console multiplayer… somehow? I mean how the hell do you stuff netcode in this day and age?

        • LovermanOwens
        • 9 years ago

        Civ V?!?!?

          • yogibbear
          • 9 years ago

          Nah it was a buggy mess on release and the multiplayer was broken…. so……. not going to list it.

      • LovermanOwens
      • 9 years ago

      Troll much?

        • paulWTAMU
        • 9 years ago

        It’s not trolling if what he stated is real; Civ V at launch was basically unplayable for me on anything larger than a medium sized map (frequent crashes), had huge balance issues (hello 4 horseman conquest rush!) and had tons of other minor to major bugs and design flaws–unbalanced unique traits for civs (the ottoman one is a joke, the americna one is a joke, the german one is godly if you have a lot of barbarians, the Arabic one is nice)…it’s not trolling to point out the glaring problems just because Civ is a storied franchise. Hell, even the recent patches seemed to actually make things worse–nerfing effective strategies rather than building up weak ones to be viable.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 9 years ago

          Civ 5 is out on how many consoles?

          Civ 5 kind of sucks, but it’s not even out on consoles so it’s hard to argue that it’s a half assed port.

      • Buzzard44
      • 9 years ago

      Dead horse is dead.

      • njsutorius
      • 9 years ago

      I think pc gaming isn’t dead its just going to evolve.. im pretty sure once mouse/keyboard becomes easily usable with consoles, and the graphics levels matches pc’s than we will all just buy the consoles.. like the next xbox will have graphics taht are good enough.. and if i can use a keyboard then i’ll just switch.. of course ill still have a pc, but now i can play with all my friends. lol

        • BoBzeBuilder
        • 9 years ago

        Consoles will never have good enough graphics. That’s the point. As PC hardware advance, console hardware remains the same through it’s lifetime and inevitably games start to look like crap.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 9 years ago

          I think consoles and PCs are going to look more and more like each other until the point where you can’t really tell the difference.

    • Walkintarget
    • 9 years ago

    Note to Microsoft:

    PC gaming is not dead. Year after year you have wooed gamers with your continual promises of supporting our habit. Games for Windows Live ??? C’mon … stale bread.

    Enjoy your Xbox hardware, and thank Valve for doing what you never could. Now stop with the empty promises and try and keep your employees happy. They seem to be diving off the sinking ship quickly these days.

    I really, REALLY want to give MS a pass or two on their gaming support, but after hearing the same story for three iterations of Operating Systems, its time to move on and enjoy Valve for what it is … gaming (sales, distribution, pricing) done right.

      • cynan
      • 9 years ago

      Lol, it seems as if Microsoft just can’t do anything right lately. From their failed add campaigns (particularly those ones with Sienfeld – he was good on the AMEX commercials) to their arguably almost undeserved bad press with Windows 7 phones and Vista, to their execution of almost any new venture in recent years (including PC gaming and the Zune – which wasn’t such a bad product in it’s on right), with the exception of the Xbox and perhaps their cloud data hosting/management for the business sector.

      Now Google is claiming that their search engine is copying their search results…

      It’s a good thing they still make gobs of revenue off Windows and Office. Lately they’ve needed every cent.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 9 years ago

        They’ve somehow managed to get people to pay for services on the xbox which are free every where else. Which is pretty amazing. Especially as they don’t provide servers for games. You are literally paying for a match making service.

    • indeego
    • 9 years ago

    One company that certainly is deserving of revenue. They have arguably saved PC gaming.

      • no51
      • 9 years ago

      What are you talking about? PC gaming is DEAD, our numbers that measure retail sales through b&m stores excluding Walmart says so!

      • rechicero
      • 9 years ago

      And then, Steam is a dealbreaker for me. I respect others can have other priorities, but If I buy, say, Oblivion for console, I can install it and play without Internet connection, give it away, lend it to a friend, resell it or whatever. If I buy Oblivion from a B&M shop, I can install it and play without Internet connection, give it away, lend it to a friend, reselll it or whatever. If the shop I bought the game from closes, no problem for me.

      If I buy Oblivion from Steam, I won’t be able to do all that. Less rights is a bad thing to me as consumer. And some good features (and Steam have some really cool features) are not enough to compensate less rights (for me, again, I don’t want to generalize).

      If Steam is the future of PC gaming, there’ll be one PC gamer less in the world. I accept others doesn’t care about all that.

        • indeego
        • 9 years ago

        I believe all Steam games work in offline mode in this manner, if they don’t, it’s the publisher itself that is to blame. Valve doesn’t control the DRM beyond the purchasing subsystem of the games on its platform beyond what the publishers specify.

        • LovermanOwens
        • 9 years ago

        How to you expect game makers to protect themselves from piracy? Aren’t the discounts on steam a good trade-off from losing the rights you brought up?

          • rechicero
          • 9 years ago

          Not for me. And about gamemakers and piracy, I just need a simple search to download any Steam-protected game. There are plenty of unprotected games that sell a lot (Sins of a Solar Empire, Oblivion, Hearts of Iron, Europa Universalis, etc). You should design your game for your paying customers, not for pirates. DRM is driving customers away (when you need to download a crack to play an original game… next time you’ll probably think you can download it right away and forget about buying the game). But that’s just my opinion.

          Anyway, I understand if they are selling games at lending prices, then that would be a fair trade-off (considering the game as lended and not bought). I gave you a thumbs up for that. Good point 🙂

        • Sargent Duck
        • 9 years ago

        I can verify that you can play Steam games off-line. I recently lost my Internet for a day while switching ISP’s, I was able to fire up games that I already had installed (don’t know about installing new ones).

        Oh, and don’t think this DRM thing is only for PC’s. I’d lay real money on the line that the next wave of consoles by Microsoft and Sony will require always connected connection. Look at what Ubisoft is pulling with PC’s, they’ll be pushing Microsoft and Sony that same way.

          • rechicero
          • 9 years ago

          I’m pretty sure I said “Install and play”. Not long ago, my ISP really messed up and I ended up 4 months without connection…

          If next gen consoles requires always connected connection… then they’ll save PC gaming! :-D.

          • kamikaziechameleon
          • 9 years ago

          The lack of rights consumers of xbox live have and how much they pay for a basic consumer right just goes to prove that while oblivion steam vs console is a good example, you can’t resell bad company 2 on console and expect the full game and in addition to buying the online pass you also pay extra for the “privelage” to play your game you just bought for 60 dollars online over xbox live. The day of owning software is dead sadly. DRM is part of all the major platforms and making a case that consoles don’t have it makes you poorly informed.

        • flip-mode
        • 9 years ago

        I almost never spend more than $15 on a game on Steam, and often times it’s more like $5 a game. $15 is a night at the movies and $5 is renting a movie, while those same amounts on Steam are usually 15 or more hours of game playing. So, I absolutely get my money’s worth.

        Let me ask, what do you usually pay for a game and how much do you resell it for? Do you resell all of your games or just a few. Your post reads like your primary issues are economic, and I’d be very surprised if the economics of Steam didn’t result in less money spent when all is said and done – at least, if you buy like me at the $15 and below level. For people who buy games on launch day for $50 or $60, well, they’re not seeing any economic advantage at all.

          • rechicero
          • 9 years ago

          The funny thing is I never resell a game :-D. But when I like a game, I like to lend it to friends. And I’m somewhat paranoid with ISP (after 4 months without connexion last year, I think you’d understand me). And, sometimes, I play really old games (like Centurion: Defender of Rome)… And I wouldn’t like not to be able to play some game in the future because Steam went south and I can’t install them.

          Anyway, as I said to LovermanOwens, the “selling at lending prices” is a good point. I know a lot of people like Steam, I didn’t want to convince anybody. I just wanted to say there are people who doesn’t like Steam (I know a few). Just another point of view.

            • kamikaziechameleon
            • 9 years ago

            Fair enough. I never bought games on steam till the online passes on consoles started then it was a moment where I realized that it was all for nothing. I bought left 4 dead 2 at like 5 dollars on sale.

        • BKA
        • 9 years ago

        IIRC, Steam has already addressed this and said precautions are in place where you would still be able to play your games offline via a released patch. People can say the same thing for Itunes can’t they? What if they went out of business?

          • rechicero
          • 9 years ago

          I don’t buy from iTunes either! 😀

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 9 years ago

        The only example you give that I can’t do on steam is resell.

        Sure sharing my account with another person is against the license agreement, but I can still do it. That’s how I played Portal the first time in fact.

          • rechicero
          • 9 years ago

          Of course you can do whatever you want if you go against de license. You can download the pirated version and call it a day. All your problems solved.

          IF you just want to “bend” the rules, you won’t be able to install a game offline or if the servers are down or the company goes south (Leman Bros seemed bigger and healthier than Steam).

          Anyway, I didn’t want to “attack” Steam. I just say we, as costumers, should applaud when they offer us a better product (Steam offers some of that), but we should be more beligerant with DRM. I’m not a crook, I’m a paying costumer, and I’m not willing to see how pirates have better products (no DRM hassle) than me. That’s all.

          For example, I can’t understand how anybody can buy The Witcher 2 from Steam when they can buy it without any DRM from other sites (like GOG). That’s just stupid.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 9 years ago

            I wouldn’t say it’s stupid (although GOG does seem to offer a better value). It’s about priorities.

            Steam also offers social networking that aren’t matched by other PC services.Steam makes up for their DRM with value added services that aren’t matched by anyone else.

            It’s not skin off my back if you don’t want to use Steam. I was just offering counter arguments.

            Also, it’s funny. Buying used games is just as bad if not worse for publisher and developers than pirating their games. They still see no money from it, and since you are spending money of them that means less money to spend on new games.

            • rechicero
            • 9 years ago

            Well, The Witcher 2 is not a game that requires social networking, is it? Anyway, maybe stupid wasn’t the correct word: I respect that some people like Steam. But, as they are very vocal, I wanted to add another point of view. Saying that it saved the gaming PC is an overstatement.

            Steam has good things and bad things. In my ideal world, users cheer good things and criticize bad things. So, IMHO, you should ask for the end of DRM. We should send a message to the industry: “We’re not pirates, we pay, and we won’t accept less rights.” As simple as that.

            • no51
            • 9 years ago

            Does GOG offer autoupdates?

            • kamikaziechameleon
            • 9 years ago

            I’ll explain why steam saved pc gaming. The desperate communities using the many expensive and varied chat services and secondary community tools had spread out people. DRM on the verge of killing sales outright all to prevent a few loosers from torrenting the game. Steam created a Xbox live like service(minus the movies) and it charges nothing unlike live. It just asks for a relatively un intrusive DRM to be tolerated. This DRM offers so much in exchange for its hinderance. While yes you can only be logged into one machine at a time it gave us unlimited installs, cloud saves, phenominal community tools, great matchmaking tools, descent anti hacking tools for competative MP. It is a DRM that is distributed for free to devs and publishers alike. If steam hadn’t come along when it did I think we would have seen pc gaming disappear.

          • kamikaziechameleon
          • 9 years ago

          you can gift.

        • siberx
        • 9 years ago

        What you haven’t addressed is the value that Steam *adds* to a title purchased through it; you do lose the right to resale and the ability to play it completely sans internet connection (athough the majority of single-player games on Steam can be run in offline mode once installed and running), but you gain a lot of valuable assets in return. The ability to never lose track of your disc or cd-key, the guarantee that the game will be autopatched to the latest version for you without any extra effort, the very robust friends features (including server-joining in some titles), the ability to purchase, download and play all from the comfort of your computer chair in minutes, the extremely varied library of games all in one location, and the abundance of simply excellent discount deals all presented to you without having to driving around town rooting through discount bins…

        Steam is DRM, yes. It is also, however, the least invasive DRM scheme in use, and provides a huge host of value-added features in exchange for the “freedoms” lost. These features are more valuable to me to the point that I would rather purchase a game through Steam these days to leverage them than deal with the additional headaches of other avenues of game purchase. When it’s either that or have EA/Ubisoft/etc. slap some invasive, poorly coded broken DRM scheme on top of a game and give you nothing in return… the choice is clear.

          • rechicero
          • 9 years ago

          Everybody has their criteria. All I say is Steam has good things and bad things. We shouldn’t choose the lesser of two evils. That’s all.

          Btw, the less invasive DRM is not Steam. Some Paradox games (Europa Universalis, Hearts of Iron) have a very practical and intelligent DRM:

          If you want to update or online help, then you’ll need to register.

          Do you want to pirate them? Great, you’ll have a product worse than the paying customer, not the other way around.

          About automatic update in Steam, the thing is: That should be a native feature in all games. They can call home to let you play or not, and they can’t ask if there are new updates???? And nobody cares????????

          Sometimes I thing players have been brainwashed or something.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 9 years ago

            [quote}We shouldn’t choose the lesser of two evils. That’s all.[/quote]

            Maybe ideally, but in the real world nothing is perfect.

            [quote<]Sometimes I thing players have been brainwashed or something.[/quote<] Hey man, it's not like PC gamers are paying for a match making service like XBox Live. The is a line drawn somewhere.

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 9 years ago

        I’m at a loss to tell you the sad trueth console games are about to go the same way harder and faster than pc has with even less consumer rights/priveleages. While day and night valve gives its consumers more microsoft gives their consumers less for that 50 dollars a year to even use their flippin online service where in no content is free.

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