Release roundup: Fresh PSUs, cases, and propeller blades

In stark contrast to last week, when the Chinese New Year slowed the flow of news from hardware makers to a slow drip, we’ve gotten a real deluge of release announcements since Monday. Enermax, Eurocom, Ecomaster, MSI, Thermaltake, and XFX all have fresh news to share.

  • Enermax announces Hoplite mid-tower case. Here’s a new enthusiast enclosure from Enermax. The Hoplite features room for up to six fans, a hot-swap docking station at the top, two 3.5″ hot-swap drive bays at the bottom, space for an additional four hard drives, and a front fan door. Not too shabby for $99.
  • Eurocom unveils enterprise all-in-one PC. While probably not terribly appealing to enthusiasts, Eurocom’s latest machine is interesting nonetheless. This is no bulky enterprise laptop. Rather, the Eurocom Uno 2.0 combines a 19″ 1440×900 display (which has optional multi-touch input support) with mobile Intel Core i3, i5, and i7 processors, up to 16GB of DDR3 RAM, and up to 2TB of storage capacity via two physical drives. And there’s even a VESA mount. The product page quotes a starting price of $964.

  • Ecomaster announces Lepa G series power supplies. I haven’t heard the name Ecomaster too many times, but from the looks of things, it’s the parent company behind the Enermax brand. In any case, Ecomaster has introduced a family of 80 Plus Gold-certified power supplies under the new Lepa brand. These G-series units include 500W, 700W, and 900W models priced at $119, $159, and $189, respectively. All have modular cabling, and the PSUs can purportedly achieve efficiency as high as 93%.

  • MSI unleashes the R6870 Hawk with Propeller Blade technology. Here we have a new take on AMD’s Radeon HD 6870 GPU, this time with MSI’s Twin Frozr III dual-fan cooler, which purportedly enables “20% more airflow and up to 21°C lower temperatures” (compared to the stock cooler). The card also features an “8+2 phase PWM design to provide the GPU with 2 times the power supply, along with triple overvoltage functions”—additions that are sure to make overclockers happy.

  • Thermaltake adds new Toughpower Grand PSUs. Say hello to Thermaltake’s 850W, 1050W, and 1200W ToughPower Grand units, which all carry 80 Plus Gold certification with “more than 93% efficiency at 50% load.” Other perks include “massive” 12V rails and flower-shaped 140-mm fans that keep spinning for up to 30 seconds after the system is shut off, allegedly to increase PSU longevity.
  • XFX Pro Series PSUs become available. Announced last October, these PSUs are now available at Newegg in 650W, 750W, and 850W flavors priced at a respective $89.99, $109.99, and $129.99. We’re seeing the units listed at TigerDirect and NCIX, too. All three models have 80 Plus Bronze badges, 135-mm ball-bearing fans, SLI and CrossFireX certification, and beefy 12V rails.

My, that’s a lot of PSUs. It looks like 80 Plus Gold certification is becoming a popular feature, though, and prices for certified units are becoming pretty reasonable. That $119 Lepa unit looks particularly interesting, especially if it’s as efficient as Ecomaster claims.

Comments closed
    • Mystic-G
    • 9 years ago

    All that airflow going in this round-up. The last picture should be of dust bunnies.

    • Jambe
    • 9 years ago

    I would like to see a series of 80 Plus Gold “enthusiast” power supplies in 3, 4, 5, and 600W varieties.

    Seriously, 850W? [b<]TWELVE HUNDRED WATTS?[/b<] I realize these things are niche products but honestly, how many people in this world have computers with kilowatt power supplies in them? And how many of those systems [i<]actually need[/i<] the capacity? How much money is there in the kilowatt-plus PSU market? *sigh*

      • flip-mode
      • 9 years ago

      1.2 kw PSU have been around for 1 or 2 years now, and people have been exclaiming in wonder about them for 1 or 2 years now. There must be people out there that buy them because new models keep being made.

      • QLO
      • 9 years ago

      I’m getting one of these in 400W:

      [url<]http://www.fspgroupusa.com/advanced_search_result.html?keyword=AURUM&search_in_description=1[/url<]

      • jpostel
      • 9 years ago

      These go to 11

    • A_Pickle
    • 9 years ago

    [quote<]"Studies have shown that reducing energy requirements along with the power management of computers and monitors can significantly reduce their energy consumption, saving hundreds or thousands of dollars a year on electricity costs."[/quote<] [i<]- Source:[/i<] Eurocom press release, 8 February 2011 Or... we could just use fewer computers/printers/IT stuff. *cough* I'm lookin' at you, U.S. Air Force. ಠ_ಠ

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      On a similar note, you could also save money by just spending a whole lot less on a PSU that’s not so overkill.

    • internetsandman
    • 9 years ago

    “…combines a 19″ 1440×900 display…”

    I didn’t realize it was possible to make displays that big with resolutions that small. That resolution belongs on 13 inch laptops, not 19 inch behemoths

      • UberGerbil
      • 9 years ago

      Actually, 1280×1024 was a popular resolution in 17″ and 19″ for quite a while, going back to CRTs, and that’s only slightly more pixels (in a square-er aspect ratio). My mother loves her 19″ (1280×1024) LCD precisely because the dot pitch is so low (she actually runs it with “large fonts” aka 120 dpi) — easier on her aged eyes.

      Though I agree, it would be nice to see something higher res than 1366×768 in the mainstream laptop screens.

        • djgandy
        • 9 years ago

        Yes, 10 years ago. It was popular because that was the max resolution of 99% of those screens, you couldn’t really get anything else. You’d think that they could do better these days though.

      • Trymor
      • 9 years ago

      I have 2 – 19″ widescreen LCD’s, and they both are that rez. Turn ’em tall way 😉

        • Bombadil
        • 9 years ago

        I have one of the rare 1680×1050 19″ LCDs–all the resolution with less desk space and power use.

        It is weird how people a hyper focused on physical display size. While with digital cameras its always mega pixels instead of sensor size. I’ll take the opposite. Smaller displays with more pixels are easier on the eyes, and bigger sensors take better photos than mega pixels. I’ve had 22″ and 20″ 1680×1050 LCDs, and the 19″ is only worse for watching movies on the couch. The 32″ 1366×768 TV is even better for couch use, but completely fails as a desk monitor.

          • Trymor
          • 9 years ago

          “Smaller displays with more pixels are easier on the eyes” – Not with Windows, in general, if a person doesn’t have eyes like yours.

      • d0g_p00p
      • 9 years ago

      “19 inch behemoths”

      lol!

        • Hurstmeister
        • 9 years ago

        “19 inch behemoths”

        I thought that was amusing also. I use a 32″ Samsung 1920×1080 LCD as my main monitor. It makes my wife’s little 21″ Dell LCD look puny by comparison.

          • Trymor
          • 9 years ago

          Me too. Twas cheaper than a 22-24″ monitor at the time, and I can always use the TV part if I wanna get off my chair and lay back on my couch in the ‘computer room’.

      • stdRaichu
      • 9 years ago

      A pox upon thou! Economy decreeth that a 13″ laptop may not have a resolution greater thanst 1366×768, and indeed thoust shall be a fine resolution even for thine 17″ laptops!

      You shouldn’t be allowed to have a resolution of 1920×1080 until you get to 32″ screens. If it’s good enough for TV then it’s good enough for computers, Hollywood says so!

      Heck, I’ve got a 24″ 1920×1200 and I find the pixels obnoxiously large. My main desktop displays are now 1920×1080 20″, which superseded my 19″ 1680×1050.

      • Chrispy_
      • 9 years ago

      It’s fine. Learn to understand dot pitch relative to viewing distance…

      OH MY GOD, MY 60″ TELEVISION IS ONLY DISPLAYING 1280 * 720 CONTENT, KILL IT WITH FIRE!!!1

    • Trymor
    • 9 years ago

    “more than 93% efficiency at 50% load.” (T.P. Grand)

    So is this our new target? See what our average pull from the wall is with a Kill-A-Watt, then target a PSU with double that rating?

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 9 years ago

      Actually, you need to factor in the power supply efficiency to convert the power at the wall to power to the PC. If the review unit is pulling 360 watts from the wall with an 82% efficient power supply, the system’s DC power demand is only 360 x 0.82 = 295 watts.

        • Trymor
        • 9 years ago

        I knew that 😉

        • Farting Bob
        • 9 years ago

        But remember that PSU’s wattage rating is based on output, so a 500w PSU will deliver 500w while drawing more than that from the wall, not the other way round as many seem to think.

    • UberGerbil
    • 9 years ago

    Hoplite? Really? Let the Sparta jokes begin… [quote<] That $119 Lepa unit looks particularly interesting, especially if it's as efficient as Ecomaster claims.[/quote<]Yeah, that one jumped out at me too. 500W at 93% efficiency? Yes, please. Those XFX Pro units look like they should be endorsed by Darth Vader.

      • Trymor
      • 9 years ago

      I think they (XFX) are beautiful 😉

        • Trymor
        • 9 years ago

        “Propeller Blade technology” – looks kinda like an impeller or turbine maybe?

      • Trymor
      • 9 years ago

      HOtswaP with led LITE – HOPLITE ?

      • dmjifn
      • 9 years ago

      I just picked up the 80 Plus Gold Seasonic x560 (SS-560KM) for around that. Options exist, unless you want to quibble over 60w & 10 bucks.

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