New Samsung hard drive sports 1TB per platter

Samsung is showing off new high-density platters at the CeBIT show in Germany. According to Heise, the Spinpoint maker has managed to create a 2TB hard drive using only two discs. Do the math, and that’s one terabyte per platter—a hefty increase over the 750GB media lurking inside Western Digital’s Caviar Green 3TB.

Like the Caviar Green, this latest Samsung drive has a 5,400-RPM spindle speed. New platter tech is easier to deploy at slower speeds, which may be why we’ve yet to see Western Digital put its 750GB platters inside a 7,200-RPM Caviar Black.

Although no official release date is mentioned, the terabyte platters are due to be available in hard drives this year. Samsung is reportedly working on stacking up to four of ’em, so we could see a 4TB drive before long. Drives with fewer platters tend to be quieter than those with more, making the lower capacity points in what may be called the EcoGreen F6 family particularly attractive for secondary storage and home-theater PCs.

Not content to offer high-density platters in 3.5″ hard drives, Samsung also showed a Spinpoint M8 notebook drive with two platters and a terabyte of total capacity. 2.5″ terabytes typically use three platters and a thicker 12.5-mm casing that’s incompatible with most notebook drive bays, but the M8 is a standard 9.5-mm model. You probably don’t want to use the M8 as your notebook’s primary hard drive, though; like the EcoGreen, its platters spin at only 5,400 RPM. Thanks to Engadget for the tip.

Comments closed
    • sjl
    • 12 years ago

    I say bring back the Quantum Bigfoot (or a similar drive series.) 2.25x the platter surface area (5.25″ diameter versus 3.5″ diameter) means that 7 TB hard drives could be a reality today!

    All it’d take is a bit more energy to spin the larger (hence, heavier) platters, and we’d be sweet for bulk storage.

    (Yes, I know it’ll never happen. Fun to speculate on the possibilities, though.)

    • LiamC
    • 12 years ago

    8 replacements in a row from the one system is statistically unlikely, i.e. are you sure it wasn’t your system? As I said, our sample sizes are in the thousands, so statistically, it is somewhat more likely that any conclusions drawn from our sample is closer to actuality.

    All drive manufacturers have firmware glitches. WD had it with nForce chipsets in early JB models (though I believe they were called BB SE then). Ask Seagate as well.

    • Prion
    • 12 years ago

    > What we do find, is that how the various distributors/VARs handle the drives between pickup and getting them to OEMs/retail is very important.

    Tell that to the company that handles Samsung’s warranty replacements, then. My Spinpoint F1 750GB failed after 8 months and EVERY REPLACEMENT was DOA or failed within 1 week of arrival. Somewhere along the line I was upgraded to a 1GB F1, same issue. Requested an F2 or F3 just to see if it would help and was declined. Samsung corporate refused to issue a refund and told me to deal with the warranty company. The warranty company told me they only have the power to send refurbished replacements and that I should talk to Samsung support. I gave up after the 8th replacement, it was an absolute nightmare.

    They may be great drives now, but it seems that if you get a lemon you’re just hosed! Like I said, you couldn’t pay me to buy another one after all of that.

    • Farting Bob
    • 12 years ago

    My board has it. If you absolutely need to boot from a 3TBdrive you’ll need a new board. If its not a system drive though theres no issue.

    • Farting Bob
    • 12 years ago

    Maybe he’ll get lucky and theyll release a 60,000rpm drive at no extra cost!

    • defacer
    • 12 years ago

    I ‘ve been using Samsung and WD drives for the past decade. The computers they ‘re in usually stay on 24/7 (the uptime on my computer right now is close to 14 full days), and the drives are not configured to shut down after idling for an amount of time.

    I ‘ve never had an issue with the Samsungs (which in my case are older, on average, than the WDs). That’s why my latest buy was an HD204UI.

    • stdRaichu
    • 12 years ago

    Yes, about 6 months ago. It’s called EFI.

    • stdRaichu
    • 12 years ago

    I was an early adopter of the vertex; hard to beleive, but OCZ’s support has gotten better. I remember when, to get a firmware update, you had to join the site, PM one of the mods with your system spec and a begging letter explaining why you were competent enough to apply a firmware upgrade, and they might then grant you the ability to download your firmware. Fun times.

    And by fun, I mean root canal fun.

    Currently no complaints about any of my OCZ, crucial or intel SSD’s 😉

    • MadManOriginal
    • 12 years ago

    Considering current ‘fast’ mechanical drives like the V-Raptor only do this in the low single-digit MB/s it’s quite possible you’ll never be awakened.

    • LiamC
    • 12 years ago

    I am a member of this (see below) forum and our sample sizes for all drives number in the thousands. Samsung is [b<]the drive[/b<] manufacturer of choice of our members. We'd be curious to hear of this well known issue you speak of... [url<]http://www.storageforum.net/forum/[/url<] We find that there really isn't much difference between manufacturers, with some notable exceptions. What we do find, is that how the various distributors/VARs handle the drives between pickup and getting them to OEMs/retail is very important. If the drives are packed in foam/shock material, not allowed to be jolted in transit, and handled with care by the human element, then the failure rate is low. If the drives are treated like footballs, packed in boxes 10 times the size of the drive, with only a sprinkling of "peanuts", then failure rates are high. Don't get me started on how some internet retailers pack their drives for end-users. How these survive is a miracle.

    • NeelyCam
    • 12 years ago

    Yeah. Having multiple HDDs in a raid is sooo overrated.

    • jstern
    • 12 years ago

    A bit before my time, but what I really meant was maybe a quarter of an inch thicker. It’s a really hard concept to explain apparently.

    • srg86
    • 12 years ago

    I think he’s suggesting going back to the days of half and full height hard drives to pack more platters on.

    • indeego
    • 12 years ago

    One way I take a look are the forums, for example in SSD world:

    [url=http://www.forum.crucial.com/t5/Solid-State-Drives-SSD/bd-p/ssd<]Crucial[/url<] (Mostly Firmware/performance gripes) [url=http://communities.intel.com/community/tech/solidstate?iid=subhdr+communities_ssdforum<]Intel[/url<] (Pretty much crickets) [url=http://www.ocztechnologyforum.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?248-Sandforce-Vertex2-LE-Pro-Agility2-Vertex2-Agility2-EX-Drives-REVO-and-HSDL-drives<]OCZ(Sandforce)[/url<] (Disaster, basic lack of compatibility with Dell and gigabyte and other MB's, DOA's after a month, end-user rage, absurd advice from Forum mods.)

    • Kurotetsu
    • 12 years ago

    [quote=”Prion”<]People sure are forgiving.[/quote<] More like the horror stories of the (extremely) vocal minority are completely worthless when it comes to gauging the quality of computer hardware. ESPECIALLY when it comes to hard drives.

    • yehuda
    • 12 years ago

    I’ve bought approx 15 drives from the F3 series, both 500GB and 1TB. It is not true that the 1TB version is quiet: it’s pretty noisy compared to other modern desktop drives, and does benefit from soft-mounting. Part of the reason I’ve been getting the 500GB ones is noise, so this article comes as good news to me and I look forward to making 1TB my new baseline when the single platter drive is available.

    • UberGerbil
    • 12 years ago

    Uh…. [i<]what[/i<]?

    • albundy
    • 12 years ago

    any news on mobo makers supporting over 2gb drives in bios?

    • Prion
    • 12 years ago

    People sure are forgiving. The Spinpoint F1s must have had an obscene failure rate. Maybe not Deathstar territory but at least IBM could be counted on to take care of their customers. You couldn’t pay me to buy another Samsung mechanical HDD.

    • jstern
    • 12 years ago

    The hard drive makers should consider making these hard drive thicker, the way they do with laptop hard drives. If it can help with noise and heat, why not? Especially since a regular PC has a lot more room than a laptop. Just a crazy thought. Why not? Perhaps they can even squeeze 5gb into one. They can be external to.

    • continuum
    • 12 years ago

    And if it works with RAID controllers…

    • thermistor
    • 12 years ago

    I have 3 of the 500Gb/1 platter models in an array. They are very cool to the touch compared to an older 500AAKS WD drive.

    The sell for me is the cool operation, but no fails over the couple of years I’ve had them is a bigger bonus.

    • seawolf1118
    • 12 years ago

    Samsung drives produce very minimal noise for sure. if they can put together 4 TB on one 3.5″ HDD that would be sweet. guess need to start planning for an upgrade to replace six Seagate 1.5 TBs on my home server.

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 12 years ago

    I have a 1TB Spinpoint F3 and I’m loving it. Zero noise even when searching through thousands of files. Rubber grommets might something to do with it too. 🙂

    • dmjifn
    • 12 years ago

    I like this turnabout, sir!

    • NeelyCam
    • 12 years ago

    Wake me up when you join the 2010’s and start using an SSD for your OS

    • NeelyCam
    • 12 years ago

    The old desktop will become my HTPC, and my current HTPC will become a hand-me-down to a friend. These days I don’t bother reusing components much – it’s too much of a hassle.

    Keeping the old PC intact means it can be used by somebody else, and the new one will have all the latest and greatest stuff. I build a new one every year or two, and these days the old PCs are perfectly adequate for some people as long as you re-install the OS

    • indeego
    • 12 years ago

    Wake me up when it has 80 MB/s or higher random read capability w/ 4K.

    • sweatshopking
    • 12 years ago

    what you doing with your old partS?

    • HisDivineShadow
    • 12 years ago

    A 4 GB slow drive sounds like a great external drive and/or server drive, assuming they have proper QA.

    • NeelyCam
    • 12 years ago

    This is fantastic! Too bad it’ll be too late for my next build..

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