Get ready for Sandy Bridge-powered Pentium CPUs

Sandy Bridge processor pricing starts at $119.99 for the Core i3-2100, which is pretty darn affordable. It looks like we might see some cheaper variants still, though. A story by Chinese site Inpai names no less than four Pentium-branded Sandy Bridge processors, and it includes some performance estimates.

The Sandy Bridge-powered Pentium family will apparently be crowned by the Pentium G850, a dual-core, dual-thread design with a 2.9GHz clock speed, 3MB of L3 cache, and a 65W thermal envelope. Word is that there will also be a 2.8GHz Pentium G840, a 2.6GHz G620, and a 2.2GHz G620T with a 35W TDP. For reference, the Core i3-2100 runs at a peppier 3.1GHz and sports Hyper-Threading capabilities.

Inpai ran some simulated Pentium G840 benchmarks using a tweaked Core i3-2100, and the results are interesting. Apparently, the G840’s performance would lie somewhere in between that of the i3-2100 and the existing Pentium G6950, which is based on the older Clarkdale design. If the price is right and these Sandy Bridge-powered Pentiums prove to have decent overclocking potential, they could be great deals for cash-strapped consumers. (Thanks to VR-Zone for the link.)

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    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 10 years ago

    Sockets will be???

      • NeelyCam
      • 10 years ago

      1155

      • JMccovery
      • 10 years ago

      More than likely S1155… Since these are Sandy Bridge based parts…

    • leor
    • 10 years ago

    Why don’t they retire the Pentium name already? Not that the core i#^% naming is any better, but damn intel that name was tired 10 years ago and based off the 5th iteration of your x86 architecture.

    They should hire Jared Jefferies to do their naming conventions, he’d be better at it than his current job.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      They sell more Pentiums than anything, and it’s also their most identifiable brand. Why get rid of it? They’ve been using the name Intel for 40 years. Better change that, too! :p

        • leor
        • 10 years ago

        Sure, by that reasoning we will end up with either having everything identified by version numbers (or did they think the pentium 5 was too redundant?) or not be able to tell what anything is unless it comes with a product chart.

        At the very least it will keep sites like TR in very good shape while people google if a pentium X79PT is faster than a core i4s 230.

      • gooch02000
      • 10 years ago

      It’s all about the Pentiums, baby.

    • NeelyCam
    • 10 years ago

    [quote<]f the price is right and these Sandy Bridge-powered Pentiums prove to have decent overclocking potential, they could be great deals for cash-strapped consumers.[/quote<] I'd be surprised if these are unlocked... and if they're not, near zero overclocking potential.

      • bcronce
      • 10 years ago

      My brother’s i7-920 was locked and he got it from 2.66ghz to 3.9ghz. Unlocked helps, but is not required. You can still mess with bus speed.

        • grantmeaname
        • 10 years ago

        Your brother’s i7-920 isn’t Sandy Bridge. TR had trouble raising the base clock from 100 to 103MHz. [url<]https://techreport.com/articles.x/20188/18[/url<]

          • bcronce
          • 10 years ago

          nice to know

      • moshpit
      • 10 years ago

      Not to mention Sandy Bridge’s infamous dislike of sub-zero cooling to begin with.

        • NeelyCam
        • 10 years ago

        Or 5GHz on air.

      • mczak
      • 10 years ago

      Not only are they locked, but worse they don’t support turbo (which would give you at least that additional 400Mhz when paired with P67 – probably all the “convenience overclocker” really needs). A fate they share with all sandy bridge dual core desktop parts FWIW – with the exception of the 35W i5-2390T which is more expensive than the 4 core part i5-2300 (which also supports turbo).
      So for any overclocking at all with Sandy Bridge you need a 180$ part.

    • 5150
    • 10 years ago

    Name: Dumb
    Value: Perhaps very good

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 10 years ago

      I think they give them these whacky names on purpose so they’re less identifiable. Everyone and their dog was buying Pentium branded Core 2s and overclocking them to be even faster than the $300 top dogs. Less than a year ago, those were still 70% of boxed CPUs sold lol.

      Ever since the Westmere Pentiums, they have gone out of their way to destroy that sense of bang for your buck.

      • superneat
      • 10 years ago

      Agreed, if Intel spent 5 more minutes on their naming schemes, they might have come up with something a little easier to differentiate between products.

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