NPD Group: P2P piracy on the decline in the US

Believe it or not, only 9% of Internet users in the US engage in peer-to-peer piracy. Well, only 9% of them admit it, anyway. According to Ars Technica, which cites data from market research firm NPD Group, the percentage of P2P pirates has fallen seven percentage points over the last three years.

Not only are fewer folks donning an eye patch when downloading, but those who continue to use P2P services are also downloading less. NPD says the average number of downloads per person fell from 35% in 2007 to just 18% at the end of last year. As Ars notes, though, the NPD Group focuses on music piracy and only tracks illegal downloads on peer-to-peer services.

The shutdown of LimeWire is being given some credit for the drop in P2P piracy, and I suspect some users are migrating to sites like RapidShare. However, the fact that the remaining P2P users are downloading less suggests that the demand for pirated music may be dwindling, at least in the US. Unlike even a few years ago, consumers can now download DRM-free music from a number of legitimate services. They can also pull up just about any song on YouTube for a quick listen. Maybe you can compete with free, after all.

Comments closed
    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 9 years ago

    Now we really know all those companies complaining about piracy are full of it. Not that we didn’t know it back then, but now there’s statistics.

    • Code:[M]ayhem
    • 9 years ago

    Maybe the music industry should take it as a hint that the utter crap they keep putting out isn’t even worth stealing….

    • blastdoor
    • 9 years ago

    Before iTunes I downloaded illegal music all the time. But now that it’s easy to find and buy music at prices that aren’t absurd, I don’t bother with illegal downloads.

    However, I do use bit torrent any time I want to get some video content for my iPad or iPhone that I haven’t already ripped from a netflix disc. Prices for video content on iTunes are generally too high, the DRM is too annoying, and the selection is too limited. Clearly the owners of video have not yet learned the lessons that the record labels were forced to learn. All in good time…

    • 5150
    • 9 years ago

    I suspect the drop in piracy directly correlates to the drop in the quality of music being released.

      • Meadows
      • 9 years ago

      Gotta make my mind up, which song can I taaaaake?

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        you can take any!!!!!!! ANY SONG YOU LIKE AT ALL!!!!!

    • BKA
    • 9 years ago

    People are probably getting tired of getting their systems infected and having to reload the OS or pay someone to clean it. I don’t mind the extra side work but when the same person comes to me three time in three months to clean their system because *****wire told them the file was safe I feel no remorse and still charge. By the time they pay me they could have just bought the damn download.

    • sweatshopking
    • 9 years ago

    I think it might have something to do with the prevalence of ipods/phones. If i’m at a buddies house, and he’s got a ton of music, i’m right there, just hook mine up, and get it. why DL it?

      • Corrado
      • 9 years ago

      Goes back to what I was saying earlier. Theres no DRM on iTunes or Amazon MP3 anymore. Just hook it up and go.

      • blastdoor
      • 9 years ago

      Good point!

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        ? really? it’s not often i get people saying something like that!! Thank you pokemon! Thank you 🙂

    • Corrado
    • 9 years ago

    How about the less stringent Amazon MP3 and iTunes DRM now vs then? Don’t need to get it off P2P when your buddy has it legally.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 9 years ago

      I wonder if people think this is actually legal, too, resulting in lower survey responses.

    • Skrying
    • 9 years ago

    Replaced by easy to use aggregators that search Rapidshare and the like.

      • no51
      • 9 years ago

      This. I’m curious as to what legal course of action the RIAA has to pursue with these kinds of sites.

    • blorbic5
    • 9 years ago

    I don’t belive this at all. I went over my girlfriends house who doesn’t know much about computers, and she had a game downloading via a torrent. Apparently she watched a youtube video that had step by step instruction on how to download the game and then how to apply the crack. I looked and there are multiple videos for just the one game.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      I don’t believe you! I saw a person who was using a computer and not downloading things.

        • blorbic5
        • 9 years ago

        That’s because it was downloading in the backround hidden, they are stealthy.

      • potatochobit
      • 9 years ago

      I believe
      considering I bought about 10 games this year alone on steam
      not to mention many people watch anime on streaming sites now

    • ap70
    • 9 years ago

    Of course, at this point whoever use to do that had time to download any discography or movies or games they wanted….the news sound even funny…

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      That’s a good point. Discography torrents weren’t so prevalent until fairly recently, and once people get their hands on one of those, they’re done.

      I’m sure lots of people claim they don’t pirate “anymore,” but still have a hard drive loaded with bazillions of GB of things they downloaded and still listen to/watch, with no intention of ever paying for it.

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        I’ve got a ton of music i’ve dled, and haven’t listened to.

        I’m in canada, however, so 😛

    • bdwilcox
    • 9 years ago

    [i<]"However, the fact that the remaining P2P users are downloading less suggests that the demand for pirated music may be dwindling, at least in the US."[/i<] -Or perhaps it's the fact that there isn't much worth listening to...

      • albundy
      • 9 years ago

      + infinity! this should be pinned to the top! And i dont blame piracy, i blame american idol!

    • derFunkenstein
    • 9 years ago

    I wonder if streaming over cell networks can get some of the credit for less P2P music piracy?

      • Corrado
      • 9 years ago

      It stopped me from pirating music. I can stream what I want without ads for $30ish a year from Pandora. No reason to download music.

    • odizzido
    • 9 years ago

    I am sure the US corps will credit their anti-piracy groups with this, not alternative methods of purchase.

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