Amazon’s Cloud Drive offers personal online storage

Amazon is bolstering its online storage offerings with Cloud Drive. The service offers 5GB of storage capacity free of charge, and there are numerous options if you want more. 20GB will set you back $20 a year, 50GB costs $50, and so on. Interestingly, the Cloud Drive FAQ suggests that US customers who purchase a full album at the Amazon MP3 store will be eligible for a free upgrade to the 20GB service for one year.

Music appears to be a big part of Amazon’s plans for Cloud Drive. The service won’t count MP3s bought through the Amazon store against your storage limit, and there are provisions to stream stored music (including MP3 or AAC tracks you upload yourself) via a web browser or Amazon’s Cloud Player Android app. Amazon says that web streaming is “not optimized to run on mobile phones or tablets,” but Ars Technica reports that some iPhone users have been able to get it to work with the device’s Mobile Safari browser.

Cloud Drive is built on the same infrastructure that powers Amazon’s own sites. The company’s developer-oriented Simple Storage Service relies on the same foundation and promises “99.999999999% durability and 99.99% availability,” so Cloud Drive should be reliable enough for your music collection and assorted personal files. With 5GB available for free, I’m tempted to use the service as a repository for offsite backups.

Comments closed
    • -_-
    • 9 years ago

    Adrive.com gives users 50GB free with a 2GB per file max.
    Free accounts must use their web interface.

      • albundy
      • 9 years ago

      beat me to it! lol, and i really wanted to rub it in! amazon is 10 years too late. gmail drive used to provide this for free, but updates have been scarce. Adrive rocks!

      • Kurotetsu
      • 9 years ago

      Definitely worth checking out. Thanks for the heads up.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 9 years ago

    Microsoft has been offering 25GB free storage for a couple of years now via skydrive. Max 50mb file uploads, plus the Office intergration makes it a winner for me.

      • hapyman
      • 9 years ago

      Didn’t know that about MS… I’ll have to revisit that and check them out. Thanks for sharing.

      And with gDocs you can get 20GB for a paltry $5/year, which isn’t bad. You can store any type of file in gDocs now but I guess the biggest plus of the Amazon storage, like its stated in the article, is storing and stream music.

      • Kurotetsu
      • 9 years ago

      One big advantage Amazon’s service has is that the max file size is 2GB versus Skydrive’s 50MB.

        • Farting Bob
        • 9 years ago

        rar/7zip takes care of that problem generally. Windows opens zip files natively if compatibility is an issue.

    • willmore
    • 9 years ago

    I wonder if there’ll be a fuse client/driver for this? Can this be treated as an s3 store?

    • designerfx
    • 9 years ago

    Amazon’s cloud should also be completely avoided if you’ve read up on their germs (not terms) of service.

    Courtesy of [url<]http://www.groklaw.net/[/url<] - # Amazon Cloud Drive Terms of Use 5.2 Our Right to Access Your Files. You give us the right to access, retain, use and disclose your account information and Your Files: to provide you with technical support and address technical issues; to investigate compliance with the terms of this Agreement, enforce the terms of this Agreement and protect the Service and its users from fraud or security threats; or as we determine is necessary to provide the Service or comply with applicable law. Note the disclose part, and that there is specifics as far as whom, so they can give this information (aka anything you put in there) to anyone they want, because you just gave them consent. [url<]http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/ref=hp_rel_topic?ie=UTF8&nodeId=200557360[/url<]

      • willmore
      • 9 years ago

      Wow, too bad there’s no way to obscure the meaning of data stored on a computer. Some way of hiding it or something. Damn. I guess we all have to walk around naked so to speak.

        • dmjifn
        • 9 years ago

        I know! I keep hearing “blow fish” but, not only do I find it in poor taste, I fail to see how felating a piscine solves the problem.

          • willmore
          • 9 years ago

          I know, right? I hear some people even use twofish! That’s just perverted!

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      So they’re running a free online service through advertising. Nefarious, indeed!

        • designerfx
        • 9 years ago

        No, they’re running a service through which they can disclose your information to anyone they want. It doesn’t have to be advertising. That could be government, Riaa, anyone. Storing private information there is effectively public to amazon. This is waay waaay beyond advertising.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 9 years ago

          The government and third parties of questionable ethics can obtain personal information from online service simply by requesting it?!? This is also unheard of!

          Ok, but seriously, what did you expect? How many things free online DON’T work this way?

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 9 years ago

            Many companies have reasonable privacy policies.

            Even Google doesn’t sell off your information to other companies (well not before anonymizing it).

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This