LimeWire agrees to pay RIAA $105 million

Cha-ching! LimeWire has settled with the music industry and agreed to cough up $105 million for its role in promoting piracy. As Yahoo reports, this settlement was reached as jurors considered how much LimeWire should have to pay for what the recording industry called “massive copyright infringement.” If LimeWire settled before an official verdict came down, the company probably expected to be on the hook for even more money. The RIAA had initially claimed it was owed $75 trillion, a figure the judge in the case called absurd.

Even more absurd, perhaps, is the fact that the artists whose works were pirated may not see a dime from the LimeWire settlement. The RIAA has previously used the proceeds of lawsuits to fund its anti-piracy efforts, and there’s no indication of a change in that policy.

A court injunction barred the LimeWire client from being distributed in October of last year, but it’s not gone entirely. Soon after that injunction hit, a modified version of the client dubbed LimeWire Pirate Edition popped up on the web. That app’s source code has since taken up residence at SourceForge under the name WireShare.

Comments closed
    • crabjokeman
    • 8 years ago

    Note to self: mail bomb RIAA (right after DEA)

    • mcnabney
    • 8 years ago

    Uhm, where did Limewire get $105M to even give the RIAA?

      • ludi
      • 8 years ago

      Right here:

      [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Gorton[/url<]

    • Pettytheft
    • 8 years ago

    Seems like every massively infected computer I fixed for a family member or friend seemed to have limewire on it. Maybe we should thank the RIAA for once.

    • ShadowTiger
    • 8 years ago

    This is a shame really. We were this close to a new record in lawsuits.

    • albundy
    • 8 years ago

    what would truely make my day is if limewire doesn’t give them a dime and declares chapter 11. hahahahaha! this money should go to artists, but it unfortunately wont and everyone knows it. i hope limewire stiffs the RIAA and leaves them hanging. I really do. There isn’t enough good comedy these days

    • bdwilcox
    • 8 years ago

    I don’t pirate music, but I’m suddenly getting the urge to.

    • cynan
    • 8 years ago

    Me showing my ignorance, but just how is Limewire still worth $105 million? ANd how are they still even very profitable? I guess what I’m asking is where is this $105 million coming from?

    Even if they have the funds, you’d think they would have shut down and declared bankruptcy or something and changed the name of their network, or whatever form Limewire continues to exist in.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    “Even more absurd, perhaps, is the fact that the artists whose works were pirated may not see a dime from the LimeWire settlement. The RIAA has previously used the proceeds of lawsuits to fund its anti-piracy efforts, and there’s no indication of a change in that policy.”

    I would like to see Limewire paying up to artists but some entity claiming the loss of artists and then pocketing the money is kinda insulting. I hope to see some one sue them.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 8 years ago

    [url<]http://www.riaaradar.com/[/url<] You can look up artists, albums, and labels on there to see if they have a connection to the RIAA. You may think, "Oh, but I don't listen to mainstream music!" BS. They have their hands in everything. Many "non-major" labels are still RIAA satellites, so if you buy music, know what you're supporting.

      • travbrad
      • 8 years ago

      This is one of the reasons I like to support the artists by going to their live shows. They tend to make a lot more money from that anyway than the tiny percentages they get from album sales.

      • Mr.Lif
      • 8 years ago

      Hmm. If everything here is true, then this is a great resource.

      Most of my favourite artists aren’t associated with them. Great!

    • destroy.all.monsters
    • 8 years ago

    Limewire doesn’t exist anymore as a result of RIAA actions. They should have given the RIAA nothing especially since piercing the corporate veil and tracking these people down individually is very difficult.

      • Farting Bob
      • 8 years ago

      “Limewire doesnt exist anymore”
      Oh ye of little faith!
      Limewire was a client for a network that is still very active, and there are several very good forks of limewire that didnt include the bloat that the last releases had.

        • destroy.all.monsters
        • 8 years ago

        The reference was to the company as a functioning entity FB. I’m aware there are other clients though it does look like I could have made my point more clear.

        Thanks.

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    They aren’t called the Mafiaa for nothing.

      • Meadows
      • 8 years ago

      They aren’t called that at all.

        • designerfx
        • 8 years ago

        yes, they are, and for a reason. using the courts to fix a business model is a mafia approach.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 8 years ago

          Pretty sure the mob tries to stay out of courts as much as possible.

    • sschaem
    • 8 years ago

    RIAA claimed that LimeWire broke as much as 11,000 songs copyrights.

    RIAA initially said that they where entitled to 6.8 billion$ per song.

    With those claims, How can any judge even agree to talk with any RIAA representative ?

    Yet, LimeWire agreed to pay $9545 for each song they offered in they playlist ?!?!

    But I guess RIAA lawyer need that money for their 1st class flight , 5 star hotels, limo and luxy offices.
    So they can represent their clients in style…

    This is pretty sick stuff 🙁

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    $75 Trillion Dollars made me giggle insanely. It’s not even a real figure. Maybe they can get the gov’t to print off that much money, but by then it’d be worth even less than it is now.

      • Suspenders
      • 8 years ago

      Dr. Evil obviously works for the RIAA.

      • smilingcrow
      • 8 years ago

      Just don’t use HP ink cartridges at retail prices to print the notes as the ink costs would be higher than the value of the currency.

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