New Thermaltake coolers offer more extremeness

Computex — While touring Thermaltake’s booth on the Computex show floor, we stumbled upon one of the largest CPU coolers I’ve ever seen. Behold the Frio GT, which is so large that it comes with a special anchor bracket that secures the cooler to the top panel of the Level 10 GT.

According to Thermaltake, this monster is capable of dissipating a whopping 300W with a combination of 10 heatpipes, four 120-mm fans, and enough radiator fins for an army of air towers. The Frio GT obviously won’t be a high-volume product, but Thermaltake is committed to selling it when the design is finalized.

If you’re looking for something a little less extreme, Thermaltake has the Frio, er, Extreme. This more traditional design combines a pair of 140-mm fans with a pair of radiator towers fed by six heatpipes. The fans spin at a maximum speed of 1,800 RPM, allowing the cooler to dissipate up to 250W. There’s no need to tie the Frio Extreme to your case, and the cooler should be appearing in stores shortly. Expect this slightly less monstrous cooler to cost around $90.

Unless you’re doing some serious overclocking, the Frio Extreme is probably going to be overkill. For folks running at stock speeds, Thermaltake has added a couple of low-end coolers to its Contac family. The Contac 21 and 16 are designed for 140W and 100W CPUs, respectively, making them more than adequate for Intel’s Sandy Bridge offerings. As one might expect, the Contacs have fewer heatpipes, smaller fans, and only one spinner each. Thermaltake tells us that the budget coolers should retail for less than $30.

And now for something completely different. Thermaltake is experimenting with a line of accessories designed to cut phantom power draw and provide USB charging options. Particularly interesting is a device that will completely cut the power to peripherals like printers and scanners when the host system is turned off. Thermaltake is looking to patent the technology behind these new products, and it hasn’t decided whether to bring them to market.

Comments closed
    • Anomymous Gerbil
    • 8 years ago

    OK, thanks for clearing that up Damage. Next question:

    With the Frio Extreme, isn’t the first fan/tower just going to be blowing warmed-up air onto the second tower, via the second fan? How much additional cooling is that going to give?

      • Arclight
      • 8 years ago

      I’m pretty sure you’re referring to the Frio GT and although the hot air from the first radiator will be blown on the second one you have to realize that this design has been proven by coolers like Thermalright Silver Arrow and Noctua NH-D14 which are the best air coolers on the market, beating in performance even the watercooling solutions from Corsair. If you think this is a design mistake than feel free to buy the Prolimatech Genesis which adresses the issue you put forward, just be carefull about the RAM heatsink clearance.
      [url<]http://www.prolimatech.com/en/products/detail.asp?id=801&page=1[/url<]

        • Anomymous Gerbil
        • 8 years ago

        Actually, the comment applies to both I guess. I don’t think it’s a design mistake, was just curious how it works as well as it apparently does. Thanks for the references to the other heatsinks, I guess I’ve been out of the HSF loop for a while!

    • Ngazi
    • 8 years ago

    You have to put a manual on off for the sockets. No matter what you’re doing to monitor the usage on the main it’ll take more phantom draw than any actual devices.

    • jcw122
    • 8 years ago

    I’ve been out of the loop for a few years, is Thermaltake a reputable company yet?

    • JMccovery
    • 8 years ago

    First of all, shouldn’t the Frio Extreme be positioned [b<]HIGHER[/b<] than the Frio GT, since you know, it's EXTREME? Second, I would love to use one of those Frio GTs on my lil old unlocked x2 555, just to see how high I can get it (I'm already at 4.0GHz unlocked to quad using a Scythe Mugen/Infinity 1. Also, I wonder if noise-cancelling headphones would be enough to drown out a Frio GT with 4 Delta TFB1212GHE Fans? And yes, I want people to [b<]HEAR[/b<] when I start my computer, sort of like a Big-block V8 with no cat. EDIT: Also, when is TT bringing out a Jing Extreme and a Jing GT?

    • just brew it!
    • 8 years ago

    In my experience, their coolers would be reasonable if they didn’t use crap fans. Every Thermaltake HSF I’ve owned has come with a fan that died after a year or two. I still use a couple of my Thermaltakes (nice all-copper 939/AM2 HSFs), but the fans were replaced long ago. At least they tend to get really noisy before they die instead of just seizing up (so you have some advance warning).

    • Anomymous Gerbil
    • 8 years ago

    Question from a dummy. The text says that the Frio Extreme has a pair of 140-mm fans with “a single radiator tower fed by six heatpipes”.

    But the picture shows two towers, each with one fan?

    What am I missing?

      • Firestarter
      • 8 years ago

      Awkward phrasing mostly I’d guess. It’s a pair of tower coolers, with a 140mm fan and 6 heatpipes each.

        • Damage
        • 8 years ago

        No, it looks like two towers on one socket to me, too. Maybe Geoff hit the sake too hard last night?

          • Damage
          • 8 years ago

          Ok, updated the post to match the picture. Clearly is two towers.

            • Firestarter
            • 8 years ago

            Haha I guess I managed to have myself misunderstood as well 😀

    • KorruptioN
    • 8 years ago

    I’ve always seen Thermaltake as kinda gimmicky. Plus, with the way they price, there are a lot of alternatives available.

      • Farting Bob
      • 8 years ago

      ThermalTake have always been very flashy marketing and big numbers but arent backed up by performance. Their PSU’s are rated for 8.4Gigawatts each but require fans louder than a wind tunnel and offer lower efficiency than their rivals. Their Coolers look impressive but underperform considering they are usually more expensive.

      Ive yet to find a TT product that is actually best in its price range, or even near it.

        • gbcrush
        • 8 years ago

        That’s kind of how I felt about them.

        Thermaltake for show, Thermalright for a pro.

    • Captain Ned
    • 8 years ago

    It would be interesting to bench these new coolers against a Thermalright Ultra 120 Extreme.

      • gbcrush
      • 8 years ago

      +1

    • Firestarter
    • 8 years ago

    So that Frio GT, which is 4x the size of a regular towercooler, can only dissipate about 2x the power? You’d think that a cooler of that size could dissipate up to 600watt (at least on a bench).

    Also, could one fit a 200watt peltier under that monster?

      • willmore
      • 8 years ago

      Holy Cow, but that’s a beast of a cooler! I hope TR gets a chance to review it.

    • Chrispy_
    • 8 years ago

    Regarding Thermaltake’s “new” energy saving power sockets, these things have been around for over a decade. I’m almost positive I had one for my Spectrum 48K, but I definitely used one for my Sega back in 1993.

    [url<]http://www.masterplug.com[/url<] I wouldn't be surprised if Thermaltake is awarded the patent, since the US patent system is an internationally infamous and worthless farce.

      • bcronce
      • 8 years ago

      There’s more than one way to detect and shut off power to other sockets. They probably have a “new” and “better” way of doing this.

      Kind of like tires. People can patent tires, just not the idea of a tire.

        • UberGerbil
        • 8 years ago

        I wonder if they’re just using the USB hub — oh, look, we’re getting no power from the host via USB, so it must be turned off, so everything else goes off too. That would be about the easiest circuit you could imagine, and almost embarrassing to get a patent on.

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