Sapphire shows A75 mobo, passive Radeons

Computex — While visiting Sapphire in Taipei this week, we got a quick look at new motherboards based on AMD’s 990FX and upcoming A75 chipsets. Unlike other 990FX boards, Sapphire’s Pure Black 990FX-N won’t support Nvidia’s SLI technology. Anyone think the fact that Sapphire exclusively makes Radeon graphics cards might have something to do with the lack of multi-GeForce support?

SLI also won’t be supported on Sapphire’s A75-based Llano board, but then it only has one PCI Express x16 slot. Despite the open-ended nature of the PCIe x4 slot, the CMOS battery will likely prevent folks from installing a second graphics card. In an interesting twist, there’s a Mini PCI Express slot on the board and built-in Bluetooth connectivity. The latter is probably going to be be more useful than the former, especially considering the wealth of full-sized expansion slots.

Graphics cards remain Sapphire’s bread and butter, and the company will be bundling DiRT 3 with new flavors of the Radeon HD 6950 and 6870. The 6870 is a FleX edition that includes additional circuitry to allow Eyefinity configs to run on a trio of DVI monitors (the third needs to be connected via an included HDMI adapter). On standard 6870s, Eyefinity requires one monitor to be driven by the card’s DisplayPort out, which requires a costly adapter if you want to use a DVI display.

For the home-theater PC crowd, Sapphire has whipped up passively cooled versions of the Radeon HD 6670 and 6570. The 6670 is a dual-slot design, while the 6570 comes on a low-profile card. Not that you can stuff the 6570 into a low-profile case—the passive cooler effectively makes the card a full-height design.

Sapphire’s Edge-HD nettop is one of the slimmest I’ve seen, but its dual-core Atom D510 and second-gen Ion GPU are getting a little long in the tooth. Fortunately, a Brazos version is coming soon. The AMD model will reportedly fit into the same chassis, which measures less than an inch thick.

Comments closed
    • jimmy900623
    • 8 years ago

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    • Duck
    • 8 years ago

    test

    • Duck
    • 8 years ago

    Why can’t I reply to posts but I can make new ones?

    OK so I could reply. Now after 1 reply, it’s broke again.

    • jalex3
    • 8 years ago

    shame about no sli on the am3+ board that is, but sapphires boards are loong better than what biostar and the likes have to offer, the lga2011 looks good to

    • Duck
    • 8 years ago

    Those fins on the passive cards are far too close together. In other words, they will only work in cases with med or high airflow. On top of that, the fins are pointing the wrong way for most cases.

    I have had some experience with a passive saffire 4670. The heatsink looks very similar. That’s how I know it’s no good because I have experienced it. Compare with the accelero s1 to see it done right.

      • Goty
      • 8 years ago

      I run the same 4670 you’re talking about in an HTPC case with one 800rpm 120 mm fan for ventilation and it never breaks 60C even while gaming.

        • Duck
        • 8 years ago

        that card in an antec mini p180 was aproaching 100*C in gaming. With furmark it hit 120*C from idle in no time at all.

          • defacer
          • 8 years ago

          Approaching 100° under stress is quite close to tolerable territory though, and you don’t mention what was in the P180 and how it was all cooled. As for Furmarking a passively cooled card… WHAT FOR?

            • Duck
            • 8 years ago

            Wasn’t much else in the case. Stock core i5. was low airflow though with a couple of stock fans on low. furmark was just to test the cooling as it was crashing in game i thought it might be overheating.

            Still, the fins need to be spaced further apart for passive cooling. it’s pretty well known how that will increase cooling performance. And if you have an intake in the front of your case, and exhaust in the back, fins are the wrong way round.

          • Goty
          • 8 years ago

          I just ran Furmark for the heck of it and I topped out at 78C. It looks like Sapphire more than likely knows what they’re about with these coolers.

            • Duck
            • 8 years ago

            I already proved their problems. Put in a tower case like the mini p180 and airflow is blocked by the fins as they are the wrong way round. Airflow In the other direction (convection ), is blocked by the PCB.

            • ColdMist
            • 8 years ago

            And you put it in a horizontal HTPC case, it works perfectly. I’ve never seen my passive 5670 over 50’C.

            So, be careful when assembling custom computers using non-standard parts. Be “aware” of how it all needs to fit together.

            How hard is that?

            • Duck
            • 8 years ago

            FFS, now the reply works.

            The top card in the pic is too big to even fit in a HTPC case! You guys take things far too personally. All I did is give information pointing out the design flaws in the heatsink. Take it or leave it.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 8 years ago

            Quick! Email Sapphire and all other video card makers too to let them know you’ve ‘discovered’ the design flaw in their passively cooled products. I’m sure their engineers will see the light as soon as you let them know.

            • Goty
            • 8 years ago

            1) No it isn’t. It doesn’t look any bigger than the 4670 Ultimate, which fits with room to spare inside my Antec Fusion Remote (an HTPC case, for the record)

            2) There’s only one person taking it personally in this thread. 😉

            • Voldenuit
            • 8 years ago

            Many HTPC cases accept taller than full-height cards.

            Also, anyone who’s looking to run a passive CPU/GPU HSF should be aware that case airflow (be it active or passive) is of paramount importance if you’re going to go fanless.

            • Duck
            • 8 years ago

            HTPC cases that fit taller than full height cards are near as makes no difference a tower case that has been tipped onto it’s side.

            Yes airflow is important on a passive heatsink. That’s why everyone else does passive heatsinks with wide fin spacing. These heatsinks were clearly designed either badly by incompetent people, or they were designed for fan assisted cooling. Hence, they will only work in cases with med or high airflow.

            • Goty
            • 8 years ago

            I have just one final question for Duck, here. Where’d you get your engineering degree, again?

            • Duck
            • 8 years ago

            I don’t have an engineering degree.

            • kilkennycat
            • 8 years ago

            Naw…!! The ATi driver knows how to software-recognize Furmark and throttle accordingly. (nVidia plays the same game with their latest 275.xx drivers.)

            Start Far Cry 2, with Dx10 ON, Vsync OFF and ALL graphics settings MAXED then run the ~5 minute “new-game” Single-player non-interactive intro and watch BOTH the GPU temperature AND the frame-rate on-screen as the intro is running, using the on-screen display features of MSI Afterburner or similar utility. (If the average frame-rate drops severely between the beginning and end of the intro, the on-card hardware power/temperature-limit protection has probably kicked in.)

            Using the same test, comparison with a card with exactly the same GPU/memory specs (and in the same computer) but with decent on-card fan cooling might be quite instructive…….

            • Goty
            • 8 years ago

            Sorry, but the whole “rename the executable” trick still works wonders on that little problem.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 8 years ago

      The 6570 looks right for a Shuttle.

      I had to go with an active cooled 5670 last year, would have liked a passive option like this.

    • flip-mode
    • 8 years ago

    That mini pci-e slot could actually end up pretty useful if certain types of SSDs and other mobile add-in devices are available to end users. Like so:

    [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820167039[/url<]

    • Xenolith
    • 8 years ago

    Typo – one of your 6570 came out 6750.

    • Arclight
    • 8 years ago

    Pasively cooled video cards are always a delight for users which enjoy silence above all. That said it’s sad that only the low end cards get the passive cooling tratment. Last i checked the HD 6850 was the highest performing card passively cooled.

      • defacer
      • 8 years ago

      250W TDPs and passive cooling don’t mix. For the high end of the performance spectrum it’s the physics department that decides which cards get the passive cooling treatment.

      • jensend
      • 8 years ago

      Let me get this right- somebody managed to find a way to cool a ~200W GPU passively and you’re complaining that they’re not churning out passively cooled cards with higher wattages? Do you live in Svalbard? Do you complain about your room being too hot when the ambient temperature reaches 45° F / 7° C? How the devil do you propose to dissipate three hundred watts of heat without a fan?

      And last I checked, the 6850 didn’t qualify as “low end.” The 6670 is the fastest AMD card people would be willing to classify as “low end”; the 57xx/67xx cards definitely are midrange, and AMD kind of bent the classification schemes with Barts- it’s almost fast enough to qualify as high-end, and the 68xx nomenclature reflects that, but people are reluctant to call it high-end because it’s slightly slower than the high-end cards from the previous generation.

        • jensend
        • 8 years ago

        Well, you can vote me down, but ye canna change the laws of physics, laws of physics, laws of physics; ye canna change the laws of physics, laws of physics, Cap’n.

        • Arclight
        • 8 years ago

        If they managed to do a passive cooling for atleast the 6870 if not for the 560 Ti i’d jump on it like Bill Cliton on his mistress. Don’t get too worked up, HD 6850 wattage isn’t greatly smaller than HD 6870’s and FYI it’s just a simple wish that a customer like me has, In 2007 people wanted to play Crysis on max settings and now they can. I want a passively cooled mid end card, i’m sure they will be able to do it someday, just not as soon as i hoped. Yes physics can’t be changed but TDP can be lowered with smaller fabrication node. Have a nice day, Sir!

          • Voldenuit
          • 8 years ago

          My Radeon 4850 (114 W TDP) ran happily with a passively cooled Accelero S1 – it actually ran cooler than with the stock cooler. The 6850 has a TDP of 127 W, so it’s within arm’s reach of a good passive cooler.

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