$399 Dell display has 19×12 resolution, IPS panel

In a world teeming with mediocre 1080p displays, it’s nice to see some companies try to stand out from the crowd. Dell appears to be doing just that with its new UltraSharp U2412M display, which has an impressive set of features for its $399 price tag: LED backlight, IPS panel technology, and 1920×1200 resolution.

Yes, this is one of those rare modern-day displays that hasn’t succumbed to the 16:9 craze. The 1920×1200 resolution serves up 11% of additional vertical space over 1080p, which can come in handy if you ever plan to use your computer for, you know, not watching movies on Netflix. Oh, and of course, the IPS panel should deliver better viewing angles and more accurate colors than the TN panels so common among low-end displays.

On top of that, Dell says the U2412M features a 1000:1 contrast ratio, 300 cd/m² brightness, 8-ms grey-to-grey response time, and 82% color gamut. I believe that color gamut is closer to plain sRGB than some of the newer wide-gamut displays out there, which tend to look over-saturated before calibration. Connectivity-wise, the new UltraSharp packs DVI, VGA, and DisplayPort inputs as well as a four-port USB 2.0 hub. (Thanks to Engadget for the tip.)

Comments closed
    • DarkUltra
    • 8 years ago

    “Yes, this is one of those rare modern-day displays that hasn’t succumbed to the 16:9 craze. The 1920×1200 resolution serves up 11% of additional vertical space over 1080p.”

    I’m glad the article author emphasizes this. But i wish he would also emphasize the benefits of a 120Hz refresh rate. Maybe manufacturers will listen and realize there’s a market.

      • Firestarter
      • 8 years ago

      Yessir please, 120hz panel with good angles (if at all possible) and a 16:10 ratio (1920×1200). Sell it as Ultra3D with SuperHD+ technology, whatever you need to it shipping, I don’t care!

    • Anarchist
    • 8 years ago

    what’s the point of getting 6 bit IPS panel? Why not pay half the price and stick with TN panel or pay another $100 for 8-bit panel?

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      Better viewing angles.

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        Overrated.

    • squeeb
    • 8 years ago

    I’m sure it looks nice but after using a 120hz panel for 6+ months I can’t go back..

      • Dashak
      • 8 years ago

      Which one are you using?

        • squeeb
        • 8 years ago

        Alienware OptX AW2310. The bleed is not so good, but other than that its a pretty nice LCD.

      • ew
      • 8 years ago

      If only there were a device with fast refresh rates, good color accuracy and excellent viewing angle.

        • squeeb
        • 8 years ago

        yea 🙁

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    Will they release a refresh of their 30 inch that has a similar price performance value please???

    • Spotpuff
    • 8 years ago

    SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY

    • green
    • 8 years ago

    this makes me very happy that i picked upthe u2410 last year:

    [url<]http://accessories.ap.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c=au&cs=aubsd1&l=en&s=bsd&sku=230-11017&redirect=1[/url<] brighter, better response time, larger color gamut, shorter, and thinner only downsides are heavier, deeper, and more power hungry

    • kroker
    • 8 years ago

    Very interesting monitor, seems like a direct competitor to the HP ZR24W, which I own. So far the ZR24W was pretty much your only choice if you wanted a 16:10 1920×1200 IPS without wide gamut.

    However I’m a bit puzzled aout the specified power consumption: 38 W (typical) / 72 W (maximum). For a LED-backlit monitor with 300 cd/m2 the maximum seems a bit high. The 400 cd/m2 CFL-backlit U2410 has a specified power consumption of “75W (normal operation)”. I’m not sure how far this is from the maximum power consumption of the U2410, DELL doesn’t seem to specify. Maybe the new monitor has a less efficient power supply.

    Oh well, can’t wait to read some reviews for this monitor!

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    I don’t understand why people are complaining about 6-bit. The big problem with TN panels is viewing angles. This mointor is perfect for those who want better viewing angles without spending tons of $$$$ on a full-blown 8-bit IPS.

    Color accuracy only matters for graphical and photographical professional. That’s assuming that you are willing to go through the pain of proper color calibration. Otherwise, people are putting too much emphasis on it. Back in the day, you were lucky to have 16 colors on a full color display. Most people had 4 colors on a amber/green mointor.

      • Kurotetsu
      • 8 years ago

      The whole bitness issue is pretty overblown. An owner of an NEC 2490WUxi could barely perceive a difference in color between his calibrated NEC and a TN monitor:

      [url<]http://hardforum.com/showpost.php?p=1032929442&postcount=4[/url<] I couldn't either, based on the images posted.

        • CaptTomato
        • 8 years ago

        My 8 bit was much better than a 22 and 23in Samsung TN I tested, ie, I tested video/HD/SD, hi res images, text etc, and the early model 22 was quite ordinary whereas the later model 23 had improved but there was little detail in the colours and the whole image looked faint.

        A DELL27 with it’s 1440p must be quite awesome.

        What’s the point of going XF/SLI, and always congratulating developers for improving GFX each gen but never owning any equipment to properly experience the improvements?

        For those of you who don’t own a larger LCD, you’ll also get a kick out of how good hi res photo’s look as well.

        Btw, that post was made in 2008, and that older DELL was a POS for many things, but clearly times have changed and the big DELL’s have been good for a few yrs now.

      • Parallax
      • 8 years ago

      The problem with 6-bit is that the primary reason for using it is so manufacturers can market the display as having a faster response time. The response time is measured as the time it takes to switch from one pixel value to another, and by using only 6-bit accuracy you don’t have to worry about giving the pixel time to correctly settle down on the last 2 bits. That’s one of the reasons why a 5ms TN panel can have the same amount of response-time induced blur as a 12ms IPS panel (though 2ms panels are actually faster).

      I also thought color accuracy was only for graphics professionals, but after getting mine calibrated there’s really no way I would go back even for normal desktop work. It really is needed if you have more than one display since it’s the only way to make them match.

      • Vaughn
      • 8 years ago

      Sorry Krogoth but I disagree.

      I have the HPZR24W which I just carlibrated with a $100 Spyder 3 express colour matters for everything and anything I view on the screen. Be it blue rips, pictures, even browsing websites you notice an immediate difference once you get off the 6 bit TN garbage. Pain of colour calibration you mean the 10 mins it takes to hold the sensor to the screen as it calibrates itself? Which windows saves and loads automatically at boot?

      It is my first IPS screen and I won’t be going back this dell looks like a nice alternative for a slightly lower price. The thing I love about my HP is it has 3 years onsite service and this dell being a business class monitor should offer the same. The input lag is low on the HP so need to see how this dell does in that area.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 8 years ago

      Why are you always such a d-bag about things that are subjective, and when other people choose to purchase something nicer than what you have?

        • Krogoth
        • 8 years ago

        You are missing the point.

        The flames prove that some “videophiles” are no different than wine snobs that keep insisting that their $100+ bottles are worth the cost over a $20 bottle. They don’t even consider looking at $20 bottles, because it is beneath them.

        This mointor was targeted at people who want better viewing angles than what TN panels can provide, but don’t want to folk out the huge premiums that come with a high-end 8-bit IPS panel. Dell’s OEM when through the pain of making it a 16:10 panel instead of a 16:9 panel. I guess you cannot please eveyone. 🙄

          • CaptTomato
          • 8 years ago

          In the HD era, it seems odd that people aren’t buying equipment to fully maximize the HD content.
          We now have HD everywhere, but many people seem content to use a lowly TN panel.

          It’s the same with audio….people buying 192k junk instead of 1400k CD quality.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            The reason is simple, cost.

            To most people, 8-bit IPS panels are nice, but not $300+ nice over a TN equivalent.

            Audio is a bit tricky, but for the most part a properly mastered 192K MP3 or equivalent is just about as good as any lossless format. You have to invest in some decent speakers/speakers to notice any difference.

            • DarkUltra
            • 8 years ago

            A good listening room is just as important. First time reflections and modal ringing can really ruin a good stereo.

            • CaptTomato
            • 8 years ago

            Come on champ, even 640k sounds 1000x better on my Z5500’s{$250US}

            • Firestarter
            • 8 years ago

            You try ABX-ing between a proper 192kbit/s MP3 and its CD source with your Z5500’s. I can claim to do any kind of rediculous thing if you succeed, because you will not.

            edit: Just to cover my ass: there are some kinds of music that really do fail to encode well at those bitrates. My bet though is that those sound crappy on your speakers no matter whether it’s played through MP3 or the CD source.

            • CaptTomato
            • 8 years ago

            You must have hearing problems…..and no, don’t respond, your comments are too absurd.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 8 years ago

            HD TVs do use IPS panels. Most people watch “HD content” on their TVs, not their computer. But that has nothing to do with why TVs are often IPS and monitors are often TN.

            Most people use what does its intended job. So yes, it’s very much the same as different audio formats, which exist for different reasons – not because one is better than the other for everything.

            IPS is not inherently superior image quality to “lowly” TN. Baselessly attacking what everyone else uses isn’t helpful information to others.

            The real advantage of IPS is better viewing angles, which makes more sense for screens that are going to be viewed at an angle, just like…wait for it…TVs. I can certainly find you some IPS monitors that don’t look so great, and some TN monitors with very accurate color reproduction. And I can find you a squillion quite old monitors with equal or higher resolution than HD, so bringing that up doesn’t make any sense to begin with.

            • CaptTomato
            • 8 years ago

            Anyone who values image quality understands that a TN is the bottom of the barrel tech, what I don’t understand is why so many are willing to accept it, as they look tragic to me….for example, when I came back from viewing my friends 22in TN running Doom3, I fired up D3 on my 26, and it looked like it was in 3D there was so much more depth and detail.

            Anyway, I’m also making the point that many people seem obsessed with maxing this or that game, only to run it on a lowly TN panel.

            Think of how much better a DELL27 would be over a 23.6in TN{my 26 dwarfs a 22}, and what does a 27 cost, probably about 500 or so, divide that by a 5 yr lifespan, and you’re at $2 a week for premium IQ.

            • Laykun
            • 8 years ago

            Personally I find TN monitors to be acceptable for nothing more than office work, which is completely fine. The problem I have with them though is display uniformity and lackluster colour space. This is not to say that IPS panels have superior colour space, no, that all depends on the backlight. My setup at home was not originally built for an eyefinity setup, but now I have 3 24″ 1920×1200 monitors running a spanned display. The one to my left is a TN samsung, the one in the middle an HP LP2475W which has extended gamut and the one to my right is the HP ZR24w. I wish I had gone all LP2475W, but from my subjective experience a TN panel simply falls flat on it’s face for movies/gaming mostly because of poor viewing angles vertically, not horizontally. The fact that the top of the screen gets darker then the bottom is incredibly noticeable, and more so next to two IPS panels. However the ZR24w simply can’t compete colour space wise with the LP2475w since it uses a lesser backlight, the primary colours just don’t peak as high as they do with an LP2475w. Saying that, I find the colour reproduction on the ZR24w and Sammy TN to be almost comparable when properly calibrated.

            There is a real grey zone in between IPS and TN panels, but I believe if you put in that extra $100 for something like the LP2475w you get a hell of a lot more bang for buck compared to these cheaper IPS panels, because really, when you’re spending a lot of dosh on a screen, you want that extra wow factor from the colour reproduction.

            However, to say LCDs today are good would be an absolute lie. You want a monitor to produce colours you see in real life, LCDs don’t come close. OLED is a very promising technology and will be a true step forward for colour display technology. I write this from work, on my Dell U2410 and U2711

            • CaptTomato
            • 8 years ago

            One of the biggest problems with PC LCD’s is poor blacks compared to HDTV panels, especially as most of the top panels are IPS which have weak blacks compared to the Samsung panels.

            • Laykun
            • 8 years ago

            Wait, you base that on what? HDTV LCDs use the same cold-cathode/LED backlight technology. I’ve seen far better blacks on my monitors at work than LCD TVs I’ve seen.

            If you’re referring to plasmas, you’d be insane to use a plasma as a PC monitor with all that noisy grain.

            • CaptTomato
            • 8 years ago

            Calibrated black level (black screen) 0.22 cd/m2…..IPS

            Calibrated black level (ANSI checkerboard) 0.03 cd/m2..Samsung HDTV

            If you can find a 8 bit PC LCD that can beat the Samsung, please let us know.

            [url<]http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/news/samsung-ue40d5520-ue32d5520-201107121282.htm[/url<]

    • paulWTAMU
    • 8 years ago

    Goddamnit Dell, you must need my money more than I do. I think I found my next monitor!

    • internetsandman
    • 8 years ago

    This is great. Now to bring the price down on those lovely 27″ monitors please

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 8 years ago

    Too bad they didn’t bring this to the market earlier. Regardless, I’m not interested in 6-bit panels and I already have a S-PVA which works good enough. It is nice to see new products, but I won’t be replacing my current screen until there’s an IPS that does 120hz.

      • odizzido
      • 8 years ago

      I am waiting for a 120hz IPS as well

        • mesyn191
        • 8 years ago

        You’ll likely be waiting for years then. 120hz will be for TN only for quite a while and even then most of the 120hz TN panels out are mediocre to flat out crappy right now.

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 8 years ago

          I can wait. My brother bought a zr24w, and while it does some things slightly better, I notice the viewing angles are worse and it color shifts. I don’t want to buy an ips screen until those issues are resolved. I still think that va is a better mid-range screen choice, but your options are limited and I don’t think companies are giving it the attention it deserves. Perhaps if there were more improvements to the technology it could make a comeback.

    • ShadowTiger
    • 8 years ago

    I am tempted to get 2 of these… maybe once I start making money 🙁

    • TurtlePerson2
    • 8 years ago

    It used to be that a 24″ TN would be $250 – $300 and a similarly sized IPS would be $700 – $1000. Now you can get a 24″ TN for $150 and a similarly sized IPS for $400. It seems to me that the price of both have decreased proportionally.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 8 years ago

      Yeah, ever since the panel makers/integrators got busted for price fixing monitors have gotten much less expensive. Craziness!

    • Kurotetsu
    • 8 years ago

    A 16:10 monitor without the ridiculous price gouging or prosumer assumptions is a huge win to me. Dell is also pretty good with sales so the price should come down even more.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 8 years ago

      Meh, it’s nice and all no doubt, just the fact that it’s not 16:9 pleases me if only so that it makes me hopeful for some more choice in the market for them, but it’s not like it’s a completely insane price unless you haven’t looked for a long time. HP has had 16:10 IPS monitors ~$500 or less for a while, and not eIPS either.

    • cheerful hamster
    • 8 years ago

    19 pixels x 12 pixels?

      • Parallax
      • 8 years ago

      Says so in the description.

      • pedro
      • 8 years ago

      That’s what she said.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 8 years ago

      No, 192 x 120

      • jensend
      • 8 years ago

      They will call it QQQQQQQHD (though I suppose that should be 15×9 instead)

    • Parallax
    • 8 years ago

    Too bad it’s only 6-bit [url=http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/news_archive/24.htm#dell_u2412m_info<]see here[/url<]. I personally won't touch anything that's 6-bit (because the AFRC adds so much noise) or LED (not bad in itself, but companies insist on treating them like CFLs which makes them flicker like crazy).

    • Skrying
    • 8 years ago

    Impressive price and it’s nice seeing Dell has stuck with a 16:10 ratio. I could see one of these in my future once the regular Dell discounts start happening in 6 to 8 months.

    • Tumbleweed
    • 8 years ago

    My HP zr24w (at home and at work) is also a 24″ IPS panel (matte coating FTW!), with a normal color gamut, but this looks to be even less expensive.

    I wish I could get a 27″ version, but nobody that I know of makes a 27″ IPS panel with matte coating and normal color gamut. *shrug*

      • Thrashdog
      • 8 years ago

      B&H Photo sells the ZR24W for $373, so this isn’t necessarily any cheaper than the established option. It’ll be interesting to see how they compare in terms of performance and color accuracy.

        • Tumbleweed
        • 8 years ago

        That price at B&W is not the full retail price of the monitor, though, which is like $500, I think. If this one is $399 regular price, then you’ll be able to find it quite a bit cheaper than that, I’d think. This monitor also seems to have more features than my HP, though certainly not enough to ‘upgrade’ (even assuming picture quality is as good or better, which we don’t know yet). All in all, though, more competition is more betterer. I’d like to see that new Samsung monitor with the ‘between matte and glossy’ coating I’ve been hearing about. Can’t stand glossy, but a bit more oomph than regular matte might work well.

          • Wirko
          • 8 years ago

          Someone could actually invent the antireflective coating. Camera manufacturers already have. Even the filter glasses seen on old 14″ CRTs 20 years ago had good antireflective coatings (they were easy to scratch though), they reflected less light than any of today’s glossy products.

    • [SDG]Mantis
    • 8 years ago

    Given how often Dell runs sales, seeing $399 as the base price is very nice.

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 8 years ago

      They’ve really steered away from the big coupons they used to put out. What used to be $400 in savings has become $75-100.

    • jabro
    • 8 years ago

    Dang – too bad this wasn’t out a year ago when I settled for my NEC IPS monitor, with its low price and unfortunate 16:9 ratio.

    • CaptTomato
    • 8 years ago

    Is this one of those crappy e-IPS displays or a fully blown IPS?
    My PC LCD is a 26in 1920×1200 8 bit, the last thing I’ll be doing is going smaller, so my next display will probably be something like the DELL27.

    Something that often amuses me are people who buy hexy CPU/GPU/mobo etc, yet mate it to a small LCD, often a TN panel….I went from a 19in CRT to 26in LCD and was gobsmacked at the difference.

    27in will be the smallest LCD I’ll ever use as a strict PC monitor, but I also have a HDTV connect to my PC as well.

      • zdw
      • 8 years ago

      What’s your current model (The 26′ IPS)?

        • CaptTomato
        • 8 years ago

        It’s a 2007 Acer….it’s not a IPS, it’s probably a CMO or Samsung panel, cost $750 in early 2008.
        Acer no longer make 8 bit panels either.

      • moriz
      • 8 years ago

      judging by the spec list, it’s either an 8-bit or 6-bit with some form of interpolation. so, no wide gamut here.

      more interested in how much input lag this monitor has. if it’s reasonably low, it could be a nice alternative to the HP zr24w.

      • albundy
      • 8 years ago

      agreed. my next LCD will be replacing my NEC 42″ IPS 1080p monitor. Time to go bigger.

        • Airgumby
        • 8 years ago

        How is the pixel density on that 42″? Text pretty clear? Readable?

      • Parallax
      • 8 years ago

      It’s listed as 6-bit e-ips on tftcentral.

        • CaptTomato
        • 8 years ago

        bah, crap…..IPS already struggle with black levels, and now this has the inferior e-IPS as well.

    • Zyphos
    • 8 years ago

    I’ve got two HP LP1965’s I think I’ll be replacing, soon.

    • sweatshopking
    • 8 years ago

    i’m trying to see if i can find a 24 inch monitor for less than 130$. i don’t care if it’s TN. I don’t think, as a consumer, i’d pay 3x as much, for the same size monitor, even if it does have better viewing angles. but then, i’m cheap ass. i can see this having a role for a great many professionals.

      • Sargent Duck
      • 8 years ago

      As a consumer, back in 2007, I paid $700 for my Dell 2407 IPS display. Worth every penny, as a consumer.

        • BenBasson
        • 8 years ago

        Agreed. Similar price, same year, and mine is still going strong. Dell monitors are where it’s at.

        You don’t need to be a professional to appreciate the quality difference. The 2407 is so much better than the screen I use at work.

    • Spyder22446688
    • 8 years ago

    Dell really does monitors right. Really glad to see them release another 16:10 display.

    • TheEmrys
    • 8 years ago

    This may be my next monitor.

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 8 years ago

    I almost went insane trying to look for a decent display. Most of them were mediocre at best, and anything with an IPS panel cost a fortune. Looks like I’ll be picking this one up.

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