HP slashes TouchPad price to $399.99 for good

Remember that one-weekend-only deal whereby HP peddled TouchPads for $100 off the list price? The price cut was meant to be temporary, but as webOSroundup reports, HP has now decided to make it permanent. Here’s an excerpt from a missive sent out to retailers by HP’s Stephen DiFranco:

As you may be aware, over the weekend, we offered a $100 instant-savings promotion through both our consumer and commercial channels. Despite the very short runway, we were pleased with customer response and, as a result, have made the decision to implement a $100 price drop on the U.S. list price of the HP TouchPad, enabling both HP and our channel partners to be even more price competitive in the marketplace. Effective immediately, the HP TouchPad 16GB Wi-Fi will now be available for $399.99 and the HP TouchPad 32GB Wi-Fi will now be available for $499.99.

DiFranco, who serves as Senior VP and General Manager of HP’s Personal Systems Group in the Americas, goes on to say that folks who paid full price for a TouchPad "are eligible for a coupon that offers up to $50 for applications in the TouchPad App Catalog." That’s not as nice as a rebate check, but it ought to soften the blow for the few unfortunate souls who may have shelled out $499.99 for the 16GB tablet not too long ago.

TouchPads are already available at the lowered prices from Newegg and Amazon in the U.S., as well as Future Shop in Canada. (Thanks to Gizmodo for the link.)

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 8 years ago

    Acer just rolled out a $330 tablet. Your turn, HP.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    I finally think I’ve discerned a task I’d appreciate a tablet for, DIGITAL COMICS!!!

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      There’s some in the HP App Store; don’t know if they’re any good..

    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    HP Fire sale. Getting rid of their iPad knockoff before Apple comes a knockin.

      • jstern
      • 8 years ago

      This reminds me that HP showed a table before Apple did, and when they introduced the iPad, everyone thought it looked like the HP Slate. Then a couple of months later I was reading a story about the HP Slate, and some fanboys were saying that they copied Apple, and everybody copies Apple.

      The real question is, does Steve have really good friends in the media, because the introduction of the iPad was as big as the death of Michael Jackson in every channel. That’s the real Apple advantage.

        • Deanjo
        • 8 years ago

        Actually the Newton predates any of the HP or Palm endeavor and the first palm was a dead ringer for the first newton that debuted almost a decade earlier. Also don’t forget the fact unlike other tech companies Apple doesn’t show it’s hand to anyone in advance of the official release. Just because company a shows something to the public before company b it isn’t an indicator of who has been developing it longer.

          • UberGerbil
          • 8 years ago

          And there were “slate” style machines from GRID and Pencept long before the Newton, based on DOS and Windows (including “Windows for Pen Computing” in the Win 3.x days). In fact the original Pencept was a contemporary of the first Mac. Like the later Newton (and some of the WinCE phones with touchscreens that predated the iPhone), they all relied on a stylus and suffered a similar fate.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            True, however GRiD wasn’t at that time wasn’t available to the general public and limited to military customers at the time in 89. It wasn’t what you would call a consumer device.

            • UberGerbil
            • 8 years ago

            They were sold to corporate customers also. I had one to evaluate in ’90 or ’91, and I was nowhere near anything military.

            In any case, the point is that tablets have been around for a long time, and long pre-date the iPad (and even the Newton). Just like “Apps” was a term/concept in the industry for decades despite the marketing-driven perception amongst the clueless that it didn’t exist before the iPhone.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            GRiD did not have them available to the general public until the Tandy acquisition. Until that point they were limited to military/enforcement and emergency. They were not by any stretch a Joe Consumer product. The Newton on the other hand was.

            • swaaye
            • 8 years ago

            Did the Zoomer come slightly before Newton?

            Not that it matters. People don’t connect PDAs to tablets AFAIK. Hell, I doubt that even most smartphone users ever used a PDA. Different crowds.

      • pdjblum
      • 8 years ago

      You are so far up Jobs ass, I can see you when he opens his mouth to talk. Not every news item needs a mention of this huge gadget company who owns the media.

        • Deanjo
        • 8 years ago

        Really? FYI I have HP calculators that cost more then the iPad and the only iDevice that I have bought for myself is an iPhone 4 after suffering multiple Android phone failures.

      • mutarasector
      • 8 years ago

      Spoken like a true fanboy. We’ll see how fast they ‘get rid’ of it or how this changes WebOS being implemented on 50-75 >million< devices pre year…

        • Deanjo
        • 8 years ago

        Lol and your comment is spoken like some one that has not even tried WebOS and has delusions of it being even remotely that successful.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 8 years ago

      If apple has ever had an original idea beyond… “Remove those features and that functionality” for any of their products I’ll be damned.

      Apple is a marketing machine masquerading as Industrial design savior of the electronics industry.

      I don’t hate apple I just don’t understand peoples constant misrepresentation of them. Its like how most people know not to trust marketing but they believe every marketing line to come from apple.

        • Deanjo
        • 8 years ago

        While Apple may not invent much of the technology they do however refine it to a point where it actually becomes usable and appealing to the general public. They have done this many times with their iDevices (iPod, iPhone, and iPad). The first patent for electrical input device for capturing handwriting actually dates back to the 1800’s after all.

        • End User
        • 8 years ago

        Ah, the good old marketing excuse.

    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    **dupe**

    • dpaus
    • 8 years ago

    Hello? Can anyone name the last time hp introduced a product and didn’t start discounting/couponing it within 6-8 weeks. It’s the core of their business model, folks, and it’s a big part of why they’re the biggest PC vendor in the world.

    That, and the fact that they have a new 3G/4G GSM model coming out in a few weeks, which will now occupy the upper price tier, and be a more direct competitor to the iPad2.

      • trackerben
      • 8 years ago

      Methinks am getting one. Not that I’m tired of the ipad I’ve been using since launch. It’s just that it’s become more fashionable to criticize newer designs, so naturally it’s time to jump waves and see. New useability tech attracts old arrows from fence-sitters and doesn’t always deliver better functionality and experience. But these are different things, the promise of finding something nice is there, and hands-on discovery beats listening to the naysayers. Especially when prices drop.

    • dpaus
    • 8 years ago

    Ooops, double post…

    • LaChupacabra
    • 8 years ago

    Awesome. I picked one of the 16 gig version up on Friday. It’s sweet. Hulu works, youtube.com works, the mail app is unbelievably good. Will it change my life? Nope. But it’s a fun device that doesn’t piss me off because I never know if my apps are actually closed or running in the bakcground.

      • Voldenuit
      • 8 years ago

      Haha, yeah. I hate how annoying and unintuitive Android handles something as simple as closing apps.

      That said, I’ve still got my sights set on the Thinkpad Slate running Honeycomb.

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        What is annoying and/or unintuitive about either hitting back (the supported method of leaving apps) or just leaving it running and the app closes if other apps need the memory?

        • swaaye
        • 8 years ago

        That’s because Android is designed around the apps being left running. Read up on how it works.

          • Voldenuit
          • 8 years ago

          So [i<]that's[/i<] why my wife's Android phone lasts 1 day on a charge while my Nokia N8 lasts 4 with the same usage.

    • thesmileman
    • 8 years ago

    If they had done this in the beginning they might have got some footing but now I don’t even think it matters.

    • NeXus 6
    • 8 years ago

    At least Asus had the smarts to price the Transformer at this price from the get-go. They were sold out within days of release.

    • link626
    • 8 years ago

    I love how they spin it positively.

    In other words, “sales were crappy, and people weren’t buying our bullchit, so we decided to reduce the price permanently”

    • ChangWang
    • 8 years ago

    Wow, just a little over a month… crazy! I still feel like they should have waited till this last update was ready and just launched it a month later. HP seemed hung up on the fact that this launched exactly one year later after the Palm aquisition. That’s cool and all but no one seemed to care but them and I bet this cost them potential sales.

    • Corrado
    • 8 years ago

    This + the $100 off Staples coupons make this a great deal.

      • demani
      • 8 years ago

      is the Staples coupon still available?

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