Friday night topic: Cutting the cord

So this post in the forums by TheEmrys, along with a recent encounter with shockingly clear digital TV reception in my area with a cheap antenna, has me thinking again about something I’ve long been considering: cutting the cord, so to speak, by canceling my cable TV service and moving to a mix of broadcast TV, my own HTPC, and various streaming video services. TR blogger Jason Fox made the move a while ago with decent results.

Personally, I’m sorely tempted. The DVR that comes with our Time Warner Cable service is so awful, it’s basically customer abuse. I can’t record most channels with my non-CableCard HTPC and don’t enjoy the prospect of convincing Time Warner to work with me on the setup of a CableCard tuner. What’s more, most of the TV programs we watch are available in HD via over-the-air broadcast. I’m mystified why we pay what we do for the small number of programs we watch on that horrific DVR.

Saving the 60 bucks or so we cough up each month for cable TV service would allow us to subscribe to a host of streaming video services or to, you know, buy DVDs or Blu-ray discs. My initial plan was to sign up for both Netflix and Hulu Plus, but after looking at the selections, I wonder if we shouldn’t just pay for show and movie rentals on a per-episode basis. Seems like it would give us more selection without costing much more, in practice, than multiple monthly fees—especially during busy months when we can’t spare much time for television.

That’s all negotiable, though. My only real snag? I really enjoy watching Monday Night Football sometimes. Pulling the plug with the season upon us would sting a bit.

I’m wondering: what have you done on this front? Have any of you pulled the plug and moved to streaming services? If so, how has it gone? What mix of services works best for you, and why? Discuss.

Comments closed
    • PainIs4ThaWeak1
    • 8 years ago

    Scott,

    As far as football is concerned, you could always look into NFL Game Pass (A streaming service).

    *BUT* (and this is a big *but[t]*), technically it is not available to the US. Only those residing outside of it.

    – As per NFLGamePass:
    “NFL Game Pass is only available to users located outside the United States, Mexico, Bermuda, Antigua, the Bahamas, and any U.S. territories, possessions and commonwealths (including American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands) (collectively, the “Game Pass Excluded Territories”). You are not authorized to use NFL Game Pass if you are located in any of the NFL Game Pass Excluded Territories.”

    However, if you could find yourself a foreign VPN service you’d probably be able to slide by the radar.

    Just a thought.

    • HighTech4US2
    • 8 years ago

    Media distribution cartels are evil.

    For those here who have cut the cable and recommend ESPN3.com how exactly did you do it.

    This is what my internet provider Time Warner states:

    Time Warner Cable video subscribers who have ESPN as part of their cable package can watch ESPN3.com.

    So if you cut the cable and only have Time Warner Road Runner internet service you CAN NOT GET ESPN3.

    • dextrous
    • 8 years ago

    I cut the cord in Jan. I’ve missed Fox Sports, but nothing else really. I use Media center for an OTA DVR. The quality is better than you get with cable. I also have playon for streaming some online content to my TV. ESPN3 covers most of my sports needs. I have Netflix for now, but I don’t stream enough for it to really make sense.

    I have found that I occasionally miss channel surfing when I’m bored, but I end up doing something productive instead of being a TV zombie. My wife and I actually find this to be a big upside to cutting the cord. Life is better when you don’t spend as much time watching TV.

    My advice: Test OTA reception, build your own DVR, and try using it before cutting the cord. Going cold turkey will make it much harder to transition and lower your chances of success.

    • bobboobles
    • 8 years ago

    Haven’t had cable/satellite for 13 years, and I don’t miss it a bit. We moved to a rural road that doesn’t have cable and didn’t want to spend the money for satellite. We did set up some rabbit ears that usually picked up PBS and the local news stations and were fine with that. Then when Hulu and the other internet streaming sites showed up a few years ago, I was able to watch the 3 shows I enjoyed in high quality.

    The switch to digital OTA killed our reception. On top of being 60 miles from the majority of stations, we live in a hole and can’t reliably receive anything. I did build a home brew antenna from coat hangers that worked semi-good, but only when pointing out the window of our highest, west-facing room. That just happens to be our junk room so it’s no use trying to watch TV in there.

    Anyway, with the advent of online TV streaming sites, there’s no reason at all for me to have cable. We spend enough on our 3mbps DSL as it is… Maybe that’s next!

      • Oem
      • 8 years ago

      Why not put the antenna in the junk room and run a coax cable down to your TV room?

    • HighTech4US2
    • 8 years ago

    Scott go for it and never look back. You will not miss cable TV and will save bundles of cash.

    We made the move years ago to get off of the Cable/Fios/DirectTV merry-go-round with the ever increasing prices and restrictions of packages and have been very happy since the move.

    We currently have a HTPC running Windows 7 Media Center which by the way is freely bundled with Microsoft Vista & Windows 7 (in the home premium or higher) versions.

    We love 7MC (Windows 7 Media Center) as a DVR along with the features it provides for music and pictures. The wife sometimes just watches the 7MC screen saver where it randomly shows pictures from our library of 10,000+ photos.

    The HTPC we have is older tech but more than enough power for it and casual gaming.

    AS Rock 775 motherboard with 4gb DDR 3 and an Intel 8200 quad core processor, 1 tb main hard drive, three HD Happauge tuners, a Nvidia GTS450 video card, a Gyration wireless mouse and mini-keyboard and a WMC remote.

    This system is capable of recording 3 shows at the same time, or recording 2 and watching 1 as live tv. I plan to upgrade to a fourth tuner soon as sometimes we have found that we have needed to record 4 shows at the same time (usually during sports playoffs). So be sure that your HTPC has enough slots for the tuner cards. Happauge does have dual tuner cards for PCIe slots and single tuner cards for both PCIe and PCI slots.

    HD picture quality with off-the-air broadcasts is phenomenal.

    And as a DVR the storage is unlimited (only limited by disk storage).

    And you can archive the recordings, edit them with VideoReDo, and convert them to DVDs.

    With our growing library of saved TV shows I have added a 4-bay eSata box with (4) 1.5tb drives running in raid-5 mode. This works out to be 4.5 tb of redundant storage for many many years of HD TV recording along with picture and video archives.

    • Sunburn74
    • 8 years ago

    I’m in the same boat where MNF is basically all I’d need cable for. I cut the cord a longtime ago. For MNF I generally go out to watch it (either at a bar or casual restaurant or at a friends place). To do so will cost about $100-$150 dollars for the football season, but thats only a drop in the bucket compared to the $700+ you’d spend on cable for stuff you state yourself you don’t use.

    And I echo the sentiment that if the NFL offered online streaming for $100-$150 a year for even a team of your choice, I’d buy it without a moments hesitation.

      • HighTech4US2
      • 8 years ago

      Quote” And I echo the sentiment that if the NFL offered online streaming for $100-$150 a year for even a team of your choice, I’d buy it without a moments hesitation.”

      Same here. I also miss ESPN’s PrimeTime show.

      Yet the stupid NFL is hooking up with Time Warner.

      If they provided a Pay-Per-View or package deal for games and I for one will buy. If they require me to have any of the media providers (Cable/Fios/DirectTV) first then no sale.

      Right now I to do what you do and go to a sports bar.

      The media cartels (Cable/Fios/DirectTV) control what you can watch and the media providers need to see that they can have more clients if they lose the exclusivity that these media cartels have and allow pay for view streaming.

    • PetMiceRnice
    • 8 years ago

    Where I live, cable providers in the past little while have finally started to offer different “packs” (for lack of a better term), usually each with a different theme based on what might types of channels might interest you. I think it is a big improvement over just basic cable or full cable and a similar rigid structure that was previously offered on the HD end of things. Although I’m not likely to do it myself, I do know a couple of people who have done away with cable TV completely and have replaced it with some of the suggestions that have already been discussed in this topic.

    • glynor
    • 8 years ago

    I wish I could cut the cord, but there isn’t a legal way to get the shows I want via the currently available services.

    I don’t pay $60/month (or whatever) for [i<]cable[/i<]. I pay it for HBO. The rest is just gravy. If I could pay HBO $15 or even $20 per month directly, for same-day online streaming (which would be much better for them, compared to what they're getting from the cable companies) I'd cancel my TV service and use OTA, iTunes, Hulu, Netflix, and the web to get other stuff when I want it.

    • no51
    • 8 years ago

    I haven’t had cable since I moved into my apartment last November. I don’t particularly miss it other than having certain channels (Discovery, History, USA, Cartoon Network, Comedy Central). If I could get those channels and those channels only for about $20, I would gladly pay it; but as of now, it’s $40ish for basic and I don’t watch enough television to justify it.

    • irvinenomore
    • 8 years ago

    TV?

    Yarr!

    • Voldenuit
    • 8 years ago

    We cut the cord preemptively, as in, we’ve never paid for cable.

    With Netflix raising prices by 60%, we’ll also be cutting that in September.

    • wierdo
    • 8 years ago

    Cut the cord a long time ago, best “$1000/year in my pocket” decision that I ever made.

    Youtube is enough entertainment for me when I got nothing else to do, otherwise I’m outside doing some BBQ or at home playing a free or ad-supported flash & computer games.

    If you’re watching sports channel and can’t live without instant updates on that though… well yer semi stuck with the ball and chain I guess lol.

    • Corrado
    • 8 years ago

    I pay $105/mo for 35/7 internet, all non-pay channels + HBO + Starz + HD-DVR + HD Box + unlimited phone from comcast.

    The internet alone is $69/mo if its not bundled. If I paid $69/mo for internet, $15/mo for netflix, $12/mo for hulu+, thats $96 a month. I then need to buy 2 set top boxes, whether they’re Roku, AppleTV, WD Live, what have you at an average of $70 each. So essentially over 1 year, I pay MORE money to NOT have cable? And I still can’t watch baseball or football without spending more money on MLB.tv or the NFL Replay? Yeah… really saving money.

      • mightymightyme
      • 8 years ago

      $9 for Netflix streaming, $8 bucks for hulu. ($50 a year for every MLB game, $40 a year for every NFL game, and the ability to watch them on multiple devices, an additional $7 a month basically).
      No one is telling you there isn’t a higher up front cost, it’s about saving money in the long run. Also keep in mind that most cable TV bills are introductory rates for the first year, but require a 2 year contract.
      Then again its not for everybody, but its becoming a better option for more and more people.

        • Corrado
        • 8 years ago

        Its not $50 for EVERY MLB game. Its $50 for every MLB game except the ones I want to watch. I want to watch the Phillies, and I live in Philly. I also don’t want to wait till Monday or Tuesday to watch the football games on NFL replay. And $9 for Netflix streaming isn’t the best deal since the streaming library is quite limited. Its $15 now for streaming + 1 disc.

        And my TV bill was that for $85 for the first year and $105 for the 2nd. I know i got a killer deal, and I”m not sure how we got such a deal, but it is what it is. I’ve researched getting rid of cable and it just doesn’t make sense for us. And its not $7/mo for NFL, because the NFL is only on from august until January. Theres nothing on NFL replay for half the year. So its really $14/mo.

        If they did away with the blackout rules on MLB.tv i’d do that in an instant. They’re the most ridiculous ever. I don’t even care if they broadcast the commercials on the local affiliate on it. I want MLB.tv for mobile watching BECAUSE I’M NOT HOME TO WATCH THE GAME.

    • Malphas
    • 8 years ago

    I haven’t really watched television since the early 2000’s, I occasionally watch a DVD at a friend’s house or something on YouTube, but that’s about it. I do feel woefully behind popular culture sometimes as a result though. Things like My Name is Earl, Scrubs and Lost still feel like recent shows to me (never watched them but heard about them from people), and when people are discussing recent TV and things like Pop Idol I have no idea what they’re talking about.

    My last memories of watching television are things like Third Rock from the Sun, Malcolm in the Middle, The Sopranos, Oz, Cowboy Bebop, etc. I’m not against television or being snobby or anything, I just have no free time to watch any.

      • smilingcrow
      • 8 years ago

      Thanks for finding the time to comment on something that you have no time to do! 😉

    • DancinJack
    • 8 years ago

    The only reason I don’t cut out the cable is for sports broadcasts. ESPN is getting better about putting things on ESPN3 and such, if you’re lucky enough to have access to service through your ISP. If every game I wanted to watch was on the internet, i’d gladly get rid of our cable too.

      • jpostel
      • 8 years ago

      It’s really just the sports for me too.

    • albundy
    • 8 years ago

    cut the cable bs. netflix/roku will do the job. I only watch starz/showtime/fx shows. its the only thing thats non-reality/non-csi type bs/non-garbage, and worth the $.

    • liquidsquid
    • 8 years ago

    We can’t get cable, and satellite would turn my family into a bunch of TV zombies. However I live on a hill and get 50+ stations (many repeats) so we get all of the major shows. I built a custom DVR with dual OTA tuners and it has been working out OK with a few quirks. TV shows have been degrading severely over the past 20 years IMHO for families so there is not a lot to record. The moral level of shows have dropped and dropped, it is sad…
    However we did watch a show of Happy Days, and yes, absence does make the heart grow fonder. It stunk.At least Little House on the Prairie is still good even by today’s standards.
    I am getting tired of flipping channels and seeing some dude with all of his skin peeled off or a headless body as I accidentally skip by another CIS show. I really don’t know how people can watch that after a long week of work. Stress on top of stress.
    To sum it up, we have over the air and it is good enough. We buy movies and have Netflix. We buy because we never return movies on time and find we should have just purchased them and saved the trouble.

      • spigzone
      • 8 years ago

      I too pine for the days of innocent, Beaver Cleaver, yore.

    • mutarasector
    • 8 years ago

    I hearya Scott,

    I suppose that is what it really comes down to – which end of the channel spectrum does one favor for viewing? Network programming sucks, and if that was all I watched, I’d be sorely tempted to cut the cable myself.

    The only thing is the stuff I like to watch is not consistently available on streaming services, and I favor the upper digital channels (cable news channels, Food Network, HGTV, SyFy, SciCh, DIY, NatGeo, CMTP, VH1, local cable news).. and as you mentioned, Monday Night Football.

    On top of that, I also have to contend with ATSC reception quality issues in my area as terrain is a big impacting issue, likely more so than your less terrain dependent area.

    • paulsz28
    • 8 years ago

    Well, I’ve not done any research into cutting the cord for our setup. DirecTV is just so amazing and intuitive (have had it 3 years). Plus 80% of the shows we watch are on HBO, plus some onsie-twosie Fox and ABC shows every now and then. There’s also the cool grid-like channels they provide during major sporting events like the Masters, the British Open (golf), tennis championships, etc. The DVR on this thing is KING, and I watch all my F1 races at my leisure.

    One thing I love the big screen for is sports – but then there’s ESPN3 for that, and our local Comcast bozo’s actually did something nice and do pay for for that. This sways me a bit to cut the cord, but there’s just too much about our current service we like to let it go.

    Another thing about being attached to a TV service provider is the channel surfing – sometimes it’s just nice to mindlessly channel surf and find those weird shows out there that you end up liking (Pawn Stars, Gold Rush: Alaska, etc.).

    Even though we could probably save $100/month, DirecTV is just too awesome to let go.

      • mutarasector
      • 8 years ago

      Not to mention NFL Sunday Ticket, regional sports channels, or international language channels…

    • odizzido
    • 8 years ago

    I cut the cord, but not because I have other options. North american TV is terrible. I like japanese and british television, but sadly I can’t get those here and the TV station websites there region lock the shows I try to watch.

    If I really want to watch a show I use a proxy server in the country the show is from, but it’s a pain in the ass.

    • odizzido
    • 8 years ago

    —double post—

    • yogibbear
    • 8 years ago

    Oh have a cry, another FNT that is restrictive to the US of A. Nobody cares. Cable sucks. Wow, everyone already knew that.

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      Because, Tech-Report.com is based on USA.

      Localizations, how do they work? 🙄

    • setbit
    • 8 years ago

    Like indeego, I gave up cable around 2000. On top of that, I live in an area with only about 5 broadcast channels receivable without a large antenna. Up until recently, that has meant that our family has just watched less TV than we would have otherwise, and I’ve been fine with that.

    We first got Netflix at the beginning of 2008, without even knowing about the Watch Instantly feature before we signed up, but over time we’ve come to watch far more hours via streaming than via DVD-by-mail.

    The irony is that with the back-catalog of shows now available for streaming via Netflix, Hulu, etc., we have almost a decade of TV at our fingertips that we missed when it was on cable.

    I still haven’t entirely decided whether that’s a good thing or a bad thing.

      • mutarasector
      • 8 years ago

      Being an SG-1 fan w/200+ episodes to watch, that’s a good thing.. 🙂

    • Theolendras
    • 8 years ago

    I’m planning to do it next month right after I’m satisfied with my HTPC setup. So far, I think MCE experience in canada is so so. Microsoft does not support ATSC officially in Canada… as if they needed to do something about it. The standard is the same the two sides of the border. I’m kind of pissed of of either compagny distributors/video service or by CRTC that is always getting us behind the curve in the internet services game. Sure there are some hacks, but, my primary stations aren’t in their EPG as they are french stations. I’m turning to MythTV as I have many options on the EPG thing.

    I’ll miss you NHL games…

    • travbrad
    • 8 years ago

    I only watch a few shows, and streaming them online is a generally better experience anyway. TV is just filled with LOUD commercials. Streaming at least has a lot less commercials (for now anyway).

    I use Netflix DVD because a lot of the more obscure movies I’m looking for don’t have a stream available. I am sort of off and on with movies/Netflix though. I will get a bunch of movies/TV seasons one month then none for a couple months. There is so much content available out there (music, games, movies, books, podcasts, tv, etc), and only so much time in a day.

    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    It is kinda ridiculous. I went over to my moms and they never bought cable, they always used over the air. After the digital switch they get better looking signals then I do!!! Not just that, but some stations transmit in HD to begin with. So you don’t need to buy a HD package, you simply get HD… all over the air… for free…

    It’s ridiculous. I honestly think the generation gap is keeping the younger generation from realizing something that is free and readily available because over the air has always been considered sub par.

    The only gripe I have is I’m in a relatively small area so over the air they only get like 20(!) channels. Really it’s like 4 channels and 5 sub channels per station.

    It is messed up though. They really need to work out how to standardize their transmissions. After seeing a program that was reprocessed from 4:3 to 16:9, then transmitted to the station, which reprocesses it again, and when you finally get the signal you end up with a black border on the top and on the sides with a rectangle of television in the middle in the form of a 16:9 picture. Some of the stuff can be really messed up.

      • mutarasector
      • 8 years ago

      [quote<]It is kinda ridiculous. I went over to my moms and they never bought cable, they always used over the air. After the digital switch they get better looking signals then I do!!! Not just that, but some stations transmit in HD to begin with. So you don't need to buy a HD package, you simply get HD... all over the air... for free... It's ridiculous. I honestly think the generation gap is keeping the younger generation from realizing something that is free and readily available because over the air has always been considered sub par.[/quote<] You're first point is correct simply because of lossy compression and muxing satellite and cable cos have to employ as opposed to OTA digital transmission. Your latter point however is highly subjective because of quality of >content<....(or lack thereof).

    • thesmileman
    • 8 years ago

    My wife and I have had no cable and just over the air local for two years. We buy all our stuff through the 360, the PS3 or watch it on Hulu on a computer connected to a TV upstairs. I haven’t been happier. I used to channel surf all the time complaining that nothing was on and new I just buy what I want to watch or do something else with my time. Its great.

    Edit: Wow actually it has been 4 years since we cut the cord. Also we get DVDs of seasons every once in a while.

    • ShadowEyez
    • 8 years ago

    I’d love to, but it would cut into sports and news as OTA still can fall behind.

    • sweatshopking
    • 8 years ago

    i cut the cord on my son. it happened so quick. 40 hours of labour, and bam, here’s the scissors. pretty exciting stuff.

    • infotech
    • 8 years ago

    I cut the cord back in November 2010 and have only missed cable a little bit. Mainly for sports – Nascar half the year, local MLB, and Monday Night Football. However, I quickly got over those things. Time Warner and Comcast swapped markets and I ended up with Comcast. They raised the price of my package from about $75 for cable/internet to $150 for the lineup I had. I could only stand that for a little while before I finally ditched it. Now I’m living the simple life – no DVR or HTPC. I use Netflix, Amazon and whatever the networks decide to show. My favorite channel is Antenna TV for all the old school shows even Nic @ Nite ditched years ago. Just be sure to get a decent antenna, if it’s in your attic get an amplifier and you should be good to go. With the extra money I saved I increased my bandwidth a bit.

    • atryus28
    • 8 years ago

    We just finally cut the cord about 2 months ago. Using an HTPC with sagetv and two extenders (multi room DVR, movie collection online services via playon etc) with OTA recordings. Anything extra for shows and we use Amazon season passes. So far we are good though will miss the non local MNF games.

    Although maybe I am missing something but it would seem this is a fix for football freaks. [url<]https://gamerewind.nfl.com/nflgr/secure/packages[/url<] Considering the cost of $60 a month, I think a $40 subscription seems worth it, even with a $15 post season subscription add on. I rarely watch the games live anyhow. I have a plugin that auto skips the commercials for me. To each his own of course but I find it worth it so far.

    • mightymightyme
    • 8 years ago

    I did this 2 years ago, and don’t regret it. I currently have a OTA HD antenna, and Xbox 360 and my Win7 HTPC. For the few series I can’t get on Hulu, Netflix or OTA. I usually by the season pass on Amazon. Even with those subscriptions, and purchasing Amazon subscriptions you will save so much money. Unless your a sports fanatic ( and ESPN3 doesn’t cut it for you) I can’t recommend cutting the cord enough. You surely have better things to spend your money on.

    • My Johnson
    • 8 years ago

    Wait. How will you miss out on MNF if you have a broadcast antenna?

    Our family has been living without TV for quite some time. I’ve gone four or five year without it now. It may be rectified soon with the purchase of an antenna. I just haven’t given it much thought. But I so miss MNF.

      • Sahrin
      • 8 years ago

      MNF is on the pay TV station ESPN.

    • Tumbleweed
    • 8 years ago

    I go see movies at the theater, and buy my music and software, but I get all my tv shows from the “BitTorrent channel”. Use a private tracker. When someone makes it possible for me to watch my shows online from a single source legally, I’ll do that, but until then… *shrug*

    • BiffStroganoffsky
    • 8 years ago

    Eh, if you only watch some MNF, go to a friends house or bar and make a social activity of it. Keep the alcohol consumption down and you will still be ahead of the monthly $60 donation to Time Warner.

    If you want to be tech-y and maybe borderline (il)legal, have someone stream it to you if you are too far away to drive over that often.

    • bthylafh
    • 8 years ago

    I’ve been there for some time now. TV comes in over the antenna, and anything else is via Netflix.

    I wish they could have a much better streaming library, but I’m generally satisfied otherwise. My entertainment comes more from Internet, books, and games.

      • herothezero
      • 8 years ago

      Pretty much my take–I cut the cord over a year ago and haven’t missed anything–certainly not Comcast’s overdriven lossy video signal and 100+ channels of garbage I never watched anyway. I’m >5 miles from six HDTV towers, so the picture quality is excellent–and in an urban environment, no less.

    • Vasilyfav
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]Personally, I'm sorely tempted. The DVR that comes with our Time Warner Cable service is so awful, it's basically customer abuse. I can't record most channels with my non-CableCard HTPC and don't enjoy the prospect of convincing Time Warner to work with me on the setup of a CableCard tuner.[/quote<] Oh you poor thing, you must be forced to take this abuse, right? It's not like you live in a free country where you can vote with your dollar. Oh wait. Seriously, that's a first world problem if I ever saw one. Maybe you should watch less crap and put those $60/month towards your kid's college fund or a new bike for exercise.

      • bthylafh
      • 8 years ago

      Most places here you’ve got two options for TV if you want more than the antenna can pick up: cable or satellite. Both have drawbacks, and if one really sucks you’re basically stuck.

      • TheEmrys
      • 8 years ago

      Such anger….. someone needs a hug.

        • demani
        • 8 years ago

        or an enema…

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      i thumbed you up

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        But his troll is like babytalk compared to your mastery.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          it’s true. but i agree with his “it’s a first world problem” line. you know i’m all about that.

          • Vasilyfav
          • 8 years ago

          You don’t know the meaning of the word troll. I was stating a fact and it struck a nerve with a bunch of oversensitive americans.

            • demani
            • 8 years ago

            Really? I mean, this is a [i<]tech enthusiast[/i<] web site. What part of that is targeted to anyone other than the moderately privileged? And what would be your preferred FNT for a tech enthusiast site? It's just whining about something that you have no control over. And hey-it's Scott's site and he can set it to whatever topic he wants. You want to discuss something else, fine-go to the forums and do it. But you made absolutely no point other than that you like to complain. Way to go. And on topic: we cut the cable about 4 years ago. And we get cable modem through the Earthlink partnership so we get the standard 10/1 service for $35/month. I miss a few things, but overall its been good. And we get all the broadcast networks so sports isn't a big deal (as mentioned the broadcast is better than cable feed anyway).

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            NECKBEARD RAGE.

        • albundy
        • 8 years ago

        same here, but i disagree with putting the $ towards college funds. a degree these days isn’t worth the toilet paper its printed on.

      • CuttinHobo
      • 8 years ago

      Grumpasaurus Rex!

      • StuG
      • 8 years ago

      When you live in a First World country, you have First World problems.

        • Vasilyfav
        • 8 years ago

        Did you capitalize first world to get extra whine points?

      • Corrado
      • 8 years ago

      Why are you busy posting on tech report when you could be out feeding homeless people? Whining about how other people spend their money is such a first world problem.

      • paulWTAMU
      • 8 years ago

      If you’re that offended by people with a moderate degree of material comfort complaining, why don’t go you go do some volunteer work at a shelter?

      [url<]http://www.hulu.com/watch/111154/family-guy-quagmire-goes-off[/url<]

      • willyolio
      • 8 years ago

      Every time TR posts a review of any computing product, ever, i expect you to post in the comments about how nobody should buy it and kids are starving in africa. Whether or not a processor is a good deal or if a computer case is spacey enough to fit extra-long video cards is a first-world problem!

      Tech Report should be covering famines in zimbabwe or HIV in ethiopia! By gods, the shame of all of you tech enthusiasts wasting time talking about tech products on a tech website!

      • no51
      • 8 years ago

      Says someone who is open about their yarring exploits of video games.

      • Oem
      • 8 years ago

      The best places in the world have the best problems. I guess some people elsewhere think the fact we’re not worrying about being blown up or beheaded is something to feel guilty about. Actually it’s something to be proud of. If I lived somewhere where I was afraid for my life, I would be ashamed of my country.

        • Voldenuit
        • 8 years ago

        +1.

        I’ve lived in a country where it was illegal for me to practice my religion, where Muslims burn churches, and the government cracks down on free speech and peaceful protests (they even tear gassed a hospital recently because protesters ran into the compound to escape the police).

        B!tching about Netflix instead of worrying for my skin is a welcome change of pace.

    • 5150
    • 8 years ago

    I’m 99% percent there, as I only have DISH so I can watch the NFL games. If someone starts streaming NFL over the Internet I’ll gladly pay for it. Everything else is Netflix and DVD’s. Also just got a Roku yesterday for my other TV but haven’t gotten to play with it.

    As soon as the NFL figures out a way to stream games over the Internet, I’m still attatched to the DISH.

      • mutarasector
      • 8 years ago

      >DISH<??

      How do you get NFL over DISH? I thought DirecTV had that locked up on an exclusivity deal until 2014 for NFL Sunday Ticket? Perhaps you referring to network broadcast games, or DirecTV, and simply meant >a< ‘dish’ (not DISH, as in DiSH Network)?

      The reason I ask is because I used to operate a small dish installation business years ago and sold/installed both.

        • 5150
        • 8 years ago

        Just locals, ESPN (MNF), and NFL Network (TNF).

    • indeego
    • 8 years ago

    Did this ~11 years ago, and then the [url=http://www.theonion.com/articles/area-man-constantly-mentioning-he-doesnt-own-a-tel,429/<]Onion[/url<] mocked me for telling people about it.

      • TheEmrys
      • 8 years ago

      You’ve gotta be pretty cool for the Onion to mock you.

      • bthylafh
      • 8 years ago

      Why did the hipster burn his mouth?

      He ate his pizza before it was cool.

        • HurgyMcGurgyGurg
        • 8 years ago

        Sooooo meta…

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