Poll: Do you shut down, sleep, or hibernate?

For ages, I’ve been in the habit of never turning off my primary PC. It’s a desktop, and old habits die hard. However, the more I use sleep and hibernate modes on my notebook, the more I contemplate doing the same with my desktop.

With that in mind, I’ve whipped up a new poll to see how TR readers deal with their dormant PCs. Do you typically let your primary system run all the time, or do you shut it down or drop into sleep or hibernate modes if the system will be sitting dormant? You can cast your vote below or on the front page.

In our last poll, we tackled the third dimension—specifically, whether you prefer games and movies in 2D or with stereoscopic 3D enhancement. The results are pretty clear. An overwhelming majority (77%) prefer their content in two dimensions. 9% want both games and movies in 3D, while another 9% are willing to don dorky glasses just for movies. Only 4% of voters desire a stereoscopic experience with movies but not with games.

Comments closed
    • Waco
    • 8 years ago

    I shut mine down. The idle power draw is too high to leave it running and it never resumes from sleep properly. :/ Thankfully SSDs keep my boot times down.

    • paulWTAMU
    • 8 years ago

    Sleeping and hibernating are problematic on my machine for some reason so usually idle. Of course 90% of the time nowdays I’m uploading or downloading something (even uploading a crappy youtube video takes a few hours on my connection, so if I’m uploading a video I do it overnight).

    • tygrus
    • 8 years ago

    * None of the above.
    When not in use, it’s not idle, it’s running F@H or BOINC.
    In future, please make sure you cover more possibile options to vote for.

    • Palek
    • 8 years ago

    Shutdown at night, suspend during the day with a 5-minute idle timer.

    Unfortunately the crappy Realtek LAN interface IC on my mobo fails to regain consciousness after about 5 or 6 suspend/resume round trips, so I lose my net connection, necessitating a reboot. :S

    • LoneWolf15
    • 8 years ago

    Idle. What with dynamic DNS and a port-forwarding router, I can remote desktop into my system from anywhere if I need to.

    That, and I’m running Folding@Home anyway.

    • C-A_99
    • 8 years ago

    During the day, it idles when not in use with monitors turning off automatically. At night, I typically hibernate unless there’s an OS update, or if I need to reboot or clean out the memory for some other reason. (i.e. If there’s ever a problem with the PS/2 input.)

    • marvelous
    • 8 years ago

    It’s on 24/7. I’m on it 15 hours in my prison apartment. Monitor off when I sleep and usually downloading something.

    • Prospero424
    • 8 years ago

    I shut down my desktop workstation just ’cause it puts less wear on the RAM than S3 and S1 just pisses me off half the time I use it for a variety of reasons, but I only shut it down once a day, anyway.

    Laptops I put to sleep.

    • moose17145
    • 8 years ago

    Idle.

    I have my main desktop setup as a file server as well so that i can stream movies / music to the rest of the houses laptops and the computer hooked to the main tv. But obviously it only works if my main computer stays running… as such it stays on. I shut it down if i am going to be away for more than a day or so.

    • JoJoBoy
    • 8 years ago

    I voted for idling since its the closest but my systems is chugging workunits every minute it isn’t being used for gaming….or its shut down if im away from the house more than a day or two. FAH team 2630 needs your help.

      • rogue426
      • 8 years ago

      Do we ever

      • farmpuma
      • 8 years ago

      Yep, and all help is appreciated.

    • Jypster
    • 8 years ago

    I use sleep whenever I am not going to be at my machine for more than 5 minutes

    Desktop Idle 161 watts
    Desktop C&Q 132 watts
    Sleep 6 watts
    Off 2 watts

    I only have DAoC and LoL installed as games and they push it up to around 270 watts

    AMD PII @ 3.6 (C&Q @ 800) , ATI 5870, Nvidia 9400, 8 Gig and a 1TB WD Black

    • PeterD
    • 8 years ago

    I shut down.
    I prefer not to waste any electricity.
    That’ s only enjoyable to my electricity company.

    • dashbarron
    • 8 years ago

    Walking away for hours I’ll leave it idling by happenstance. If I’m going to work/bed/vacation, etc, I’ll turn it off. I have had it on for months at a time straight but there seems to be little point. Keeping the computer idling does nothing but drain power.

    It seems a lot of people have similar attitudes with idling. Are we so impatient that we can’t wait a few minutes to start our computer and open the applications we are returning to? Read a page in a book or magazine, use the bathroom, get a drink, pet your dog, etc. Classical modern age and impatience, everyone wants instant satisfaction despite the financial or environmental costs.

    • killadark
    • 8 years ago

    Do.people not realize there is an option called.hibernate in the computer why would you shut it dkwn when you can hibernate which is much faster to startup than from an shut down state

    • packfan_dave
    • 8 years ago

    work laptop: shut down, but only because it doesn’t sleep properly and uses nearly as much power asleep as idling
    home laptop (which is what I voted based on): sleeping; even changed the win7 setup so that the default shutdown option is sleep

    kind of wish Windows Update had an ‘install updates then go to sleep’ option

    • ColeLT1
    • 8 years ago

    Work laptop:
    Sleep on weekdays and power down for weekend, except when I’m on call (rotation), then its always on (logmein fails at wake on lan half the time).

    Home PC:
    Power on when using, monitor turns off after 5, if I’m away for 30+ minutes I will shut it down since it takes under 30 seconds to boot.

    I always overclock my main rig, and it seems to always break the sleep mode. When recovering from sleep my I7 just powers on, off, on, off, on, off, repeating forever until you kill power, and my C2Q would just bluescreen, and I can’t remember what my X2 (939) did, but it did not work.

      • jpostel
      • 8 years ago

      I have pretty much the same setup. My work laptop sleeps, but my home PC doesn’t like sleeping. My home PC started to flake out on sleep when I installed an SSD, and it NEVER hibernated properly. I turned off sleep and just made the dynamic CPU underclock more aggressive, so that when I am not using it, my Q6600 will drop below 1600 MHz from 2400 MHz.

    • Xenolith
    • 8 years ago

    Hibernate. I am buying hybrid drives or SSDs, so coming up from hibernation is fairly quick

    • srg86
    • 8 years ago

    I always just shut down, saves on the electricity bill. It also seems to balance out when I have multiple machines on at the same time if the’re shut down when not in use.

    It’s also force of habit.

      • bhassel
      • 8 years ago

      In my experience, sleep mode uses about the same amount of power as being turned off completely but still plugged in. (A few watts in both cases.) Yet with sleep mode I can tap a key and it’s back to the desktop in about 5 seconds.

        • clone
        • 8 years ago

        that depends, for me I shut it all off, the comp, the display and the speakers.

        speakers have a really bright light on them to indicate the power is on, shines into next room when everything else is off and now that I’ve developed the habit it makes no sense to have any system like the display or the speakers in a standby state.

        do it because I’m cheap.

        I wish all electronic devices that have standby allowed for manual shut off, IE: the TV is my biggest annoyance followed by my DVD / Blu Ray player.

        do they really need indicator lights to show they are off and to consume power awaiting me to turn them on?

        if they allowed for the option to be manually turned on by switch on the TV then the remote begins to work I’d be happier.

        it’s the principal not so much the actual cost, it just seems stupidly wasteful to have all of these silly lights on and receivers waiting for remote instruction.

    • Arclight
    • 8 years ago

    You should add “Always on”
    “throws energy waster gang signs”
    Who live like this ? 😀

      • Spurenleser
      • 8 years ago

      That would be Idling.

        • Arclight
        • 8 years ago

        Oups, i didn’t knew that, thanks.

    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    Idle. I’ve found with my main PC that standby doesn’t always play nicely with all the equipment I have attached to it. Wakeup and games are laggy, ethernet isn’t detected, screen is a different brightness, random BSoD, icons are readjusted, sound ends up at a different volume. It used to be a lot worse. I remember getting massive driver issues back when standby came around in Windows XP.

    That said, it works wonder for my laptop when taking it between different places when I need it on and off on a regular basis. Honestly if small little things go wrong I don’t really care, I just reboot it and usually am doing something else anyway so I multitask.

    • Vasilyfav
    • 8 years ago

    Idling & distributed computing at full power. Keeps help the room warm during colder days.

    • FatherXmas
    • 8 years ago

    Mine is doing seti@home when it’s “idling”.

    • rogue426
    • 8 years ago

    Folds 24/7 for 2630

    • ShadowEyez
    • 8 years ago

    Folding was not an option? What about crunching for team TechReport when not in use 🙂

    Though from the strict “ACPI power state” standpoint, this would be idling, but… no one uses screensavers – lolz

    • internetsandman
    • 8 years ago

    My laptop is my primary computer, the only time I actually shut it down is when I’m gonna be away from it for more than a couple days. Otherwise I just close the lid and forget about it. It has an SSD so waking from sleep is damn near instantaneous, and despite boot times also being very fast, it’s still longer than waking up, and waiting isn’t something I ever enjoy doing on my computer.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 8 years ago

    I eat power, I will not lie.

    Main desktop – never turned off, display set to “sleep” at 30mins
    NAS 1 & 3 – always on, disks set to never spin down
    HP Microserver – always on

    I posted more than my main machine because my main box uses all the above stuff so it is basically part of my main setup.

    edit: I voted idling because my main box is never turned off.

      • cygnus1
      • 8 years ago

      sounds about the same for me. before coming to afghaniland i had a beefy tower and a server on 24/7 and my laptop would automatically go to sleep after x hours. even over here, my personal laptop is on 24/7 running sabnzbd on our pitifully slow internet, and it usually has enough battery to survive our power outages too

    • jalex3
    • 8 years ago

    its on most of them time. only shutdown when im going away for a day. with its on it ON not power saving here.

    • crazybus
    • 8 years ago

    The desktop remains on 24/7 for torrenting and file serving needs. It’s also easier to schedule backuips, updates etc for in the middle of the night. Notebooks sleep when the lid is closed. I consider it a major failing of the PC industry that sleep mode is seen as too flaky for so many people. Sitting through cold boot-up times on even a daily basis seems a little ridiculous in 2011, SSD or not.

    • hansmuff
    • 8 years ago

    I used to use sleep mode because booting takes too long. Now and then I’d have some misbehaving driver cause issues with sleep mode though (in 2011 on Windows 7 🙁 ).

    Since I bought an SSD, I just shut the machine down. It boots so fast that this is no longer an issue.

      • btb
      • 8 years ago

      Ditto. By the time my 24″ monitor have synced to the input signal, my computer is like 5 seconds away from the windows desktop.

    • mnecaise
    • 8 years ago

    Idling. My primary PC is also the household file and print server. The others are laptops, which are either shut down or in sleep state (depending on which child touched it last).

    • The Wanderer
    • 8 years ago

    Idling, because that way it’s A: available at a moment’s notice with full functionality (not even the brief lag and/or occasional odd behavior which can occur when resuming from sleep), and B: accessible over the network, either for file transfer or for remote shell access or for whatever else.

    My laptop I do put to sleep, but mainly for when I need to take it from place to place without actively using it. That’s how I found out that resuming from sleep can lead to strange behavior; for instance, the daily updatedb cron job hasn’t run because the workstation was asleep, it will launch after the laptop wakes up – and while it’s running, the laptop won’t go to sleep again, because the updatedb tasks won’t freeze.

    That issue (tasks that won’t freeze) is another reason I don’t sleep my desktop; for whatever bizarre reason, there are usually at least a half-dozen non-freezable tasks on my desktop, compared to maybe an occasional one on my laptop. One of these days I want to put in the time to figure out why that happens and how to fix it…

    A fourth reason why I leave my desktop on, of course, is the constant pursuit of new uptime records. I could get those just as easily by sleeping or hibernating, of course, if not more so because hibernating means the uptime clock doesn’t stop for a power outage – but that feels like cheating, and it doesn’t address the ready-accessibility issues which are the main two reasons cited above.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    Idle on the desktop because I like to remote in from work on occasion. The laptop does the hybrid sleep thing because my wife just closes the lid when she’s done.

    • humannn
    • 8 years ago

    Well, on the rare nights when my computer is not FOLDING, running SAVETHEWORLD, or crunching IMSOAWESOME calculations that feed baby seals and cure cancer, I have it in sleep mode.

    • Jon
    • 8 years ago

    I shutdown because I don’t know how well my Raid0 array will behave if the PC sleeps.

    • shakyone
    • 8 years ago

    I have an OCZ Vertex 2 as a boot drive. It originally game with version 22 firmware. I placed it to standby once. It never started back up. I had to send it back to the manufacturer. I got a replacement. Put in latest firmware.

    Now I always shutdown. Intel 320 SSDs seem to have similar power interrupt issues. It isn’t just OCZ drives. I don’t think SSD memory/controllers deal well with power interrupts, based on many different forum posts around the web.

    Fortunately SSDs obviate the need to use standby with their fast boot times!

    • Tumbleweed
    • 8 years ago

    None of the above!

    My external brain has autonomous functions, ya dig?

    I turn off the monitor, and let the torrents flow. 🙂

    • burntham77
    • 8 years ago

    Since I don’t do much torrenting these days thanks to Netflix, my main PC gets shut down each night. Plus, it sits in the bedroom, and it can get a little loud, so I prefer it off so we can sleep.

    The little HTPC does stay on some evenings to record late night shows, like Craig Ferguson, but I turn it off in the morning before heading to work. It is very quiet. I would not care too much if that one stayed on all day because its based on an AMD Hudson chip, so power draw is very low. Still, I see no reason to leave any computer on unless it is doing something specific.

    As for sleep mode saving boot time, I use an SSD so boot time isn’t really an issue.

    My wife has her laptop set to go into sleep mode after an hour because she has a habit of falling asleep in her chair.

    • rndmuser
    • 8 years ago

    idling. I don’t overclock, all the power-saving features of the CPU are enabled in BIOS, I don’t use any electricity-wasting programs like Folding@Home or any torrent clients or whatever. I do have pets but no forced intake in the case (Antec P183) and the overall filter surface is large (all of the other potential unfiltered air intakes are sealed with the tape), so no noticeable negative effect from all the visible dust collected on the filters and once-a-month quick vacuuming is enough to maintain these filters without even removing them.

    • Skrying
    • 8 years ago

    I sleep my desktop aggressively. If I’m not going to be using it for about 30 minutes or longer I will sleep it. If I won’t be using it for longer than 24 hours I’ll shut it off and unplug it.

    My laptop is set to sleep after 15 minutes of idle and if for longer than 45 minutes will hibernate itself. I shut it down entirely every night as well.

    Boot up times have never really bothered me. For both systems they’re rather quick, easily under a minute. I also rarely keep many programs open so a full restart is not a major inconvenience.

    • smilingcrow
    • 8 years ago

    Note to all the people that are using SETI or are FOLDing etc the actual question is ‘When not in use…’ so telling us what your pet hobby is of no relevance really!

      • just brew it!
      • 8 years ago

      Yeah, but there’s no “none of the above” choice in the poll!

    • mikehodges2
    • 8 years ago

    Hibernate my main PC, out of habit. Used to do it, with my older, slower machine, only because it couldn’t wake from sleep, probably a mobo issue, and was much faster than a cold boot.

    The macbook air sleeps though, instant resume ftw 🙂

    • Ardrid
    • 8 years ago

    I’m either shut down or idling if I’m streaming or downloading.

    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    I usually pass out at the end of the day…… oh you mean what do I set my computer too when I’m done with it…..

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    I sleep here, used to fold but the heat generation during summer months didn’t play nicely with my memory.

    The only problem with sleep is that I lose optical drive when the system wakes up. It is not a big deal as I can mount CD/DVD images. If I really need to use it, I just reset the system.

    • Forge
    • 8 years ago

    I voted idle, since that’s what I’m usually doing, but I would sleep, if it weren’t for Nvidia’s inability to sleep/wake.

      • Deanjo
      • 8 years ago

      Works fine here on many nvidia systems. Even in linux.

    • Pettytheft
    • 8 years ago

    Sleep unless I am leaving for more than a day. Hibernating always gave me fits and took almost as long as a cold boot. I always I make sure I save and close anything I’m working on though. Had a word file get corrupted after a BSOD years ago so I never leave anything open other than a browser.

    • Edgar_Wibeau
    • 8 years ago

    Off. Plus PDU switched off physically. That’s because when I walk into the room I switch on the PDU directly next to the door and the PC starts. Or the PC idles while waiting for a TV show to record. Or while downloading p… erm, you know … stuff.

    • Farting Bob
    • 8 years ago

    My main PC is shutdown, my fileserver sleeps and my tortoise hibernates. I just idle most of the time.

    • fredsnotdead
    • 8 years ago

    Off, unless I want to record a TV show while away or asleep … in which case I let it go to sleep. Win7 and SSD makes booting or waking up pretty quick.

    • rwzeitgeist
    • 8 years ago

    None of the above. When my primary computer would be otherwise unused it runs the [url=http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/<]SETI At Home[/url<] application, and sometimes others, under [url=http://boinc.berkeley.edu/<]BOINC[/url<]. I configured BOINC to suspend the computation whenever I actively use the system.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 8 years ago

      I used to do the same thing. Distributed Computing efforts, in the end, just suck up power and don’t have the payoff required to offset that power usage.

        • moose17145
        • 8 years ago

        Depends…. during winter i often run distributed computing on my main desktop to help keep my room warm. My room is pretty poorly insulated…. so if it’s 10 Degrees F outside… its probably 40 or 50 degrees in my bedroom. i can get that up into the 60’s if my desktop is running full tilt. When it gets below Zero my room is really chilly… my computers are lovin it though… and usually those excessively cold weeks are when i start overclocking my computer as well….

        As for power outages…. meh… i have a UPS, and its set to automatically shut my pc down properly if it ends up being an prolonged outage and not just a couple second or couple minute ordeal.

    • FireGryphon
    • 8 years ago

    I hibernate my desktop so I can start up again later without having to do a full boot (which takes too long). I let my laptop go to sleep, but if that drains the battery too quickly for my tastes and it always bites me on the other end when I open up the screen and realize the thing went into hibernate anyway when it ran out of juice.

    • nimailni
    • 8 years ago

    I tried to leave my computer hibernated/asleep but I was not able to remotely login. The computer simply did not respond if asleep. Does anybody know how to make it respond if asleep so I could save some energy?

      • xeridea
      • 8 years ago

      You can get programs to remotely wake your computer from afar. Its called Wake On LAN. If you are wireless it is more tricky though. I think you may still be able to do it if your card/mobo supports it

        • nimailni
        • 8 years ago

        thanks xeridea!
        Do you know if it applies to hibernated or asleep computer?

    • bowman
    • 8 years ago

    None of the above. I turn off the monitor.

      • Fieryphoenix
      • 8 years ago

      That’s what idling is.

    • GasBandit
    • 8 years ago

    Idle. No pets, and when I wants on mah box, I don’t wanna wait to restore from sleep/hibernation, or god forbid, actual boot.

    • cynan
    • 8 years ago

    We have 2 cats. If I left my main PC idling all the time, I’d have to clean the air filters on my 4 intake fans 2 to 3 times as often. As it is I have to do this about once/month.

    • Blazex
    • 8 years ago

    generally my desktop is put to sleep, every now and then i just shut it off with a timer when listening to some net radio station while going to sleep myself, just wish speakers had timers in em :p
    as for my laptop, its just shut down when im not using it, if i really feel like it, the thing hibernates.

    • odizzido
    • 8 years ago

    My computer sleeps after a certain amount of time idle…..I shut it down when I goto bed though.

    • feek
    • 8 years ago

    hybrid sleep in vista/w7 is fantastic.

    • ShadowTiger
    • 8 years ago

    I don’t like how you get a BSOD if you lose power while you are in sleep mode. After finding this out I turned it off.

      • xeridea
      • 8 years ago

      Umm, if you lose power you don’t get a BSOD, you get a computer that is off. You may get a BSOD from a brownout though. If you have laptop/UPS this isn’t an issue, I seldomly use the former, and not the ladder.

        • ShadowTiger
        • 8 years ago

        I installed Vista on my new computer. I put it into sleep (default action for power button). I unplugged it and moved it to another room. Turned it on… BSOD.

        Reboot: BSOD.

        Reboot #2: Runs normally.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 8 years ago

          I’d say if you put it to sleep and unplugged it, you had it coming.

            • cygnus1
            • 8 years ago

            pebcac

            • mutarasector
            • 8 years ago

            Thats PEBCAK, not PEBCAC… 😉

            • cygnus1
            • 8 years ago

            indeed, you are correct sir.

          • Dashak
          • 8 years ago

          [quote<]Vista[/quote<] Well, there's your problem.

      • Vaughn
      • 8 years ago

      You should buy a battery backup problem solved.

    • polocabbit
    • 8 years ago

    I sleep my computer when I head out for a bit and shut down at night when I go to sleep although I’ve been considering hibernating instead of shutting down now.

    • flip-mode
    • 8 years ago

    :yawn: Wake me when the results are in.

      • ludi
      • 8 years ago

      So would that be sleeping, or hibernating?

    • [+Duracell-]
    • 8 years ago

    My primary PC (desktop at home) idles all day. I tend to be torrenting, and I have all the power-saving features enabled and no overclocking, so it shouldn’t make too large of an impact to my bill.

    My work PC (laptop) I just sleep when I’m not using it.

    • Corrado
    • 8 years ago

    Always on. My PC is also my AppleTV media server. I do put my MacBook Pro to sleep though, whenever I shut it.

    • dreamer77dd
    • 8 years ago

    I shut down my laptop but not my computer. It is doing updates and scanning. I also do folding.

    • FuturePastNow
    • 8 years ago

    Sleep. I put it to sleep any time I walk away from it for more than a few minutes, unless it’s downloading something. With an SSD, the process is virtually instantaneous.

    • SonicSilicon
    • 8 years ago

    I use Hibernate. It seems there are fewer issues come back out of it, plus I don’t have to worry about my battery draining down in a few days to a week.
    To me, it’s most of the benefits of shutting down without the drawback of a long boot.

    • FakeAlGore
    • 8 years ago

    In the warm months, I shut my PC down to conserve energy. In the cold months, I run distributed computing projects to keep my office warm.

      • crabjokeman
      • 8 years ago

      ^Yeah, Folding or SETI when it’s warm is counter-productive. “Hey, I just generated a bunch of carbon to accelerate our heat death, but at least we know that ET isn’t at this precise location in the universe!

    • I.S.T.
    • 8 years ago

    Idling. I run torrents 24/7, though soon I’ll hopefully be stopping that.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 8 years ago

      i CAN QUIT ANY TIEM i WANT!!!!!1

    • Ryhadar
    • 8 years ago

    It gets shut off. I’ve been doing this for close to 20 years now. Sleep/Hibernate is nice if I’m working on something and don’t want to shut down, but not the norm.

    I make up for it by leaving my workstation at my job on 24/7.

    • ALiLPinkMonster
    • 8 years ago

    It’s an older Pentium D Dell. So basically, it’s loud and power hungry. Shutting it down makes a noticeable difference in the power bill. The laptop in the living room (an even older Dell) doesn’t hold a charge anymore, and if the power cable moves a single nm it will lose the connection and shut down. So yeah, that one is off the vast majority of the time.

    My Transformer is coming tomorrow. I will probably have it idling as much as I can, and shut it down when completely necessary. I also ordered the dock, so that shouldn’t be a problem for battery life. I know that doesn’t count as a PC but it will become my primary computing device for a while.

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      it’s a pc. it’s the future of pc’s.

    • End User
    • 8 years ago

    I prefer to sleep a system if I can:

    Ubuntu workstation at home – sleep
    Windows 7 gaming rig – sleep
    HTPC – scheduled sleep
    Ubuntu netbook – sleep
    MacBook Pro – sleep
    iMac at work – scheduled sleep
    Ubuntu server (no display) – always on

      • xeridea
      • 8 years ago

      Wow looks like you spend most your time on a computer 🙂 I have desktop which servesas workstation (web development), gaming, HTPC, and browsing. I have a laptop but I don’t use it much, wife does though. Sleep all the way.

    • xeridea
    • 8 years ago

    Sleeping all the way. There is 0 reason to leave on (unless downloading or need to remote in or something), since resume is basically instant. With SSD my bootup is like 30 seconds + all my startup programs, and work programs, but I leave all my work stuff open (web developer) so I don’t waste time everyday opening what I was working on.

    On laptop sleep esp since I have a low end one (its fine, but slower when doing work), startup is a few mins with all my stuff so sleep is a great tool (not instant resume, but like 15 seconds).

    • Meadows
    • 8 years ago

    Voted for the last one, because it’s usually idling, with a separate power profile in Windows (including power-saving measures and a 1 minute “turn off the screen” policy) that I usually set just as I’m leaving.

    As I’m often [i<]sharing Linux distributions with my peers[/i<], staying online is crucial. In case I do leave for extended periods of time, I use Sleep. Some motherboards/RAM have certain issues, so I have a family PC that uses Hibernate instead of sleep, but that's the exception. I never use "Shut down" unless I'm fixing/upgrading hardware, or cleaning a computer's insides.

      • bittermann
      • 8 years ago

      I use whatever Windows 7 default sleep mode is, which from what I understand is a sort of hybrid sleep/hybernation mode.

        • Meadows
        • 8 years ago

        Exactly, which is irritating, so I separated the two modes.

          • cygnus1
          • 8 years ago

          why is it irritating? i don’t really use it, but hybrid sleep seems pretty smart. if your computer is idle enough to go to sleep, why not do the work then to hibernate, it’s idle so you shouldn’t even notice. then if the battery gets low while sleeping, the system can just power off without spinning anything back up to hibernate.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            Sleep and hibernate are both modes to pick back up right where you left off in little to no time. Going from standby to hibernate negates the point of putting it into standby in the first place. I don’t know why hibernate exists besides to save laptops in case of the ‘oh shit my battery is going to die’ moments when you have a bunch of crap open. It takes just about as long to wake up from a hibernate as it does to cold boot.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            The real reason why Microsoft opt for hybird solution is because it allows you to save the state in case you get a power loss when the system is sleeping.

            Sleep – saving state onto memory, it is faster to awake, but it consumes a little more power as the memory needs current to keep the data alive, but you lose the state if the system experiences a power loss.

            Hibernate – saving state onto HDD, it is slower to awake, but uses less power as the system only needs to keep ACPI circuitry active, you still retain the state in the event of a power loss.

            • Meadows
            • 8 years ago

            This time, you’re wrong. It may take just as long to resume a hibernated OS, but you will save tremendous time in that you had to close no applications and everything is just as you left it. Which means it’s tons better.

            Also, hybrid sleep uses hibernation as a fallback measure, in case power goes out or something. If it doesn’t, it resumes from RAM as if it were just “Sleep”.

            However, I separated the modes because I have 16 gigs of RAM and a limited OS partition, so hibernating is costly on HD capacity and it’s a [url=http://www.zoofur.com/thor.html<]a pain in the rear[/url<].

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            It seems for you that ponies are more than just friends…… 😆

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            I dunno… the applications I use all open on startup and I don’t leave right in the middle of work nor would I worry about saving power if I were to ‘just get up’ for something. Folders can be restored to what you last looked at with a option in folder options so all of those pop back up.

            I wouldn’t trust putting my PC into sleep or hibernate with anything important open, I’ve learned that lesson. It’s not hard to save something and most programs auto-save anyway.

    • mmp121
    • 8 years ago

    My primary personal PC (Desktop) idles when not in use.

    My primary work PC (Laptop) Hibernates when not in use.

    • grantmeaname
    • 8 years ago

    Folding!

      • Chun¢
      • 8 years ago

      True story. I just shut it down for a memory upgrade, and the up time before that was 50 days and some change.

    • cfroese
    • 8 years ago

    None of the above. When not in use, my PC is grinding through folding work units. That’s definitely not idling. 🙂

      • xeridea
      • 8 years ago

      I used to fold, but not anymore. They are really dragging their feet with that OpenCL client to make AMD GPUs more effective. I stopped when I had my room door shut most the time (roommates), and would get to hot. Also now I have to pay for power so… perhaps will in winter, though my new 6850 doesn’t have my Zalman on it so it is noisy under load.

        • cfroese
        • 8 years ago

        Misses the point of folding don’t you think? The points are entertaining and can make for some interesting competition, it’s true. But that stuff is just the fluff to make something interesting that is otherwise quite boring. The purpose of folding is to contribute to the ongoing research at Stanford. That makes the power bills worth it and I’ll do it with whatever hardware I have. If that happens to boost me up in the rankings, great. If not, so what?

          • codedivine
          • 8 years ago

          Well I think you are missing xeridea’s point. I dont think xeridea is asking for them to just raise the points for AMD GPUs, but rather that they take advantage of AMD GPUs more effectively so that they process more work units per watt.

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