HP confirms: looking to ditch PC division, nix WebOS devices

Well, that story went from rumor to confirmed in record time. Not long after Bloomberg reported it, HP has officially confirmed that it intends explore some sort of spin-off of its PC division and expand its investment in software instead. From the horse’s mouth:

HP today commented on the recent announcement by Autonomy Corporation plc (LSE: AU.L). HP confirms that it is in discussions with Autonomy regarding a possible offer for the company.

HP also reported that it plans to announce that its board of directors has authorized the exploration of strategic alternatives for its Personal Systems Group (PSG). HP will consider a broad range of options that may include, among others, a full or partial separation of PSG from HP through a spin-off or other transaction.

There’s more. The TouchPad tablet and webOS phones that HP makes? Yeah, those are over, and HP may be looking for a buyer for the webOS operating system. As the company puts it:

In addition, HP reported that it plans to announce that it will discontinue operations for webOS devices, specifically the TouchPad and webOS phones. HP will continue to explore options to optimize the value of webOS software going forward.

That news adds another dimension to the "OuchPad" nickname folks have slapped onto HP’s tablet. One wonders what Best Buy and other retailers will do with all of those excess black slates now.

This is huge news, but it’s just the beginning of what could be a very long process. I’ve been watching the Twitter chatter from former HP and Voodoo PC guru Rahul Sood. He thinks a total break with the PC business is unlikely, but then he backtracks immediately:

it’s just not in HP’s DNA to "spin off" — there would need to be some real linkage or they won’t do it. who knows, anything is possible.

Not sure if that’s analysis or coping!

Anyhow, there’s wisdom in not assuming too much in these situations. We don’t know what forms the jettisoning of the PC business and webOS will take. However, with this announcement, HP’s leadership has unequivocally signaled a major change in direction for the company.

Comments closed
    • indeego
    • 8 years ago

    Predicted failed on announcement. GG HP.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 8 years ago

      Believe me when I say nobody cares. There are people who predict failure at EVERY announcement. Even a blind squirrel is right twice a day. Or something.

        • mutarasector
        • 8 years ago

        I thought it was “even a broken clock finds a nut now and then”… <g>

    • DPete27
    • 8 years ago

    Isn’t Compaq already a spinoff of HP PC’s?

    If they ditch the HP brand altogether and just stay with Compaq I’d expect an epic fail on their PC branch. I know HP doesnt have the greatest reliability history, but Compaq is downright dismal.

    • 5150
    • 8 years ago

    And indeego is no where to be seen in these threads. Looking for a new vendor, mate?

    • thebeastie
    • 8 years ago

    If you look at the peak price of HPs stock you will see it is pretty much the exact release date of the original Apple iPad.
    Why do I mention this?… well
    I have been looking at the inch+ thick Wintel laptops for years thinking what is it going to take to break this evil curse of the PC industry? It was clear that even super thin Apple laptops were not enough because people were hopelessly addicted to the the Wintel setup and I am sure some industry insiders at the top of HP etc secretly found it hilarious that people would buy a 4kilogram 1.3 inch thick laptop over a Apple design.

    Well when i saw the Apple iPad release I knew this is what is going to to break peoples horrible Wintel addiction and try something else.
    Forcing other PC makers to compete with proper thin hardware or just start to die.

    Didn’t matter that the iPad was not even a laptop, it is what a very large consumer base wanted over a laptop because it was even more mobile and skinny.
    I know it can be hard for the tech spec head mob to understand but most people out there just consume media and Facebook, they don’t do programming code and spreadsheets etc.

    The HP stock chart says it all, the price started to drop from its peak at iPads release date and it will never get it back there again.

    The main good thing about all this is the silent and ever increasing releases of mobile devices that are as thin as Apples hardware it is finally competition time.

    The take over of some stupid software company just shows how desperate and lost they are.

      • maxxcool
      • 8 years ago

      I am not hopelessly addicted. I jut thing Steve Jobs is satan.

      • DrkSide
      • 8 years ago

      Evil curse of the PC industry is inch+ laptops? They have had thinner laptops for quite some time.

      You state that not everyone has to do programming and spreadsheets but you have to realize that not everyone has $1000 plus to spend on a laptop. You can get decent laptops starting at $400. This is where apple losses on budget.

      In fact, that $400 laptop will consume content just as good as a $1000 apple laptop and as good as the $500 iPad. The difference is the interface.

        • Decelerate
        • 8 years ago

        Interface is everything, just like perception is reality.

        Apple can’t lose on budget because they don’t offer budget. The ones losing are companies trying to cater to such a category with razor-thin margins (if they’re lucky). HP makes 5.6% profit margin OVERALL on PC products -and that includes their Envy lines- and they think they can’t sustain it.

          • mutarasector
          • 8 years ago

          That’s the key operative phrase: “…they think they can sustain it”.

        • thebeastie
        • 8 years ago

        [‘They have had thinner laptops for quite some time.’]
        LOL what kind of crack you been smoking? What laptop was thinner then the iPad when it was released?
        NOTHING, and don’t bother saying I wasn’t including Laptops because iPad is written all over my post.
        Your the very tech spec head type I tried to warn that can’t see that most people see iPads as laptops and there are 10 million tech web articles saying how iPad has slaughtered the netbook industry. It is far more then just about interface, unless you want to include iPad thinness as interface and also ditching stupid 250GB mechanical HDs for instant on nand flash you get in iPads of decent sizes like 64GB.

          • SPOOFE
          • 8 years ago

          So you compare laptops to the iPad and think you’ve made anything but the most irrelevant point?

          Hey, the iPad is thinner than a Ferrari, too, so it MUST be better!

    • dashbarron
    • 8 years ago

    Over the years whenever I’ve been in possession or had to use/fix an HP product, may it be PC, laptop, printer, scanner, whatever, in my opinion it has been complete junk. To compliment their products, they have to have the WORSE bundled software packages. Absolutely horrid. I’m glad they’re spinning off their PC division. I hope they spin the rest of themselves into the grave.

    • abw
    • 8 years ago

    Be sure that the PC division buyer will be chinese, as for IBM s Lenovo..

    Sad to see a once innovative entreprise as HP starting to decline and become
    probably a junk bond in a close future if such disastrous decisions are enforced..

    • Dr. Zhivago
    • 8 years ago

    Good riddance to their PC business.

      • Sam125
      • 8 years ago

      Hey, I have a dm1 and I quite like it despite not having an optical bay or very intelligently thought out assortment of ports.

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        i don’t mind the ports, and the optical bay would be useless. i LOVE the dm1. just like cyril.

    • Sam125
    • 8 years ago

    This is a smart move. PCs have been a losing market for quite some time now. I’m assuming the PSG doesn’t include the workstation and server groups, which are higher margin areas.

    WebOS being sold is kind of sad. It had a lot of potential but the stodgy image of Palm and HP kept it from clicking with the young tech crowd.

    • fredsnotdead
    • 8 years ago

    HP sold off their scientific instruments division several years ago. They are now known as Agilent and apparently doing fine.

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 8 years ago

      Are you sure that’s not because they left HP?

    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    Told you all that the price cut was a Firesale.

    Hey mutarasector would you care to comment?

    [url<]https://techreport.com/discussions.x/21446?post=572966[/url<] [quote<]Spoken like a true fanboy. We'll see how fast they 'get rid' of it or how this changes WebOS being implemented on 50-75 >million< devices pre year...[/quote<] What about you pdjblum? [url<]https://techreport.com/discussions.x/21446?post=572941[/url<]

      • derFunkenstein
      • 8 years ago

      Same goes for you, but you’re even more grating than indeego.

      • Goty
      • 8 years ago

      In other news, HP just sold more Touchpads than Apple will sell iPads in the next quarter. =P

        • Corrado
        • 8 years ago

        Doubt that. Hp sold around 500k touchpads. I got one this morning and am posting from it now. I have an ipad 1 as well. I tried a playbook, an iconia tab and a zoom. If the touchpad was better optimized, the os is great. The browser is fantastic, but has some slowdowns and hiccups. If the overall polish was a little better, it would be a great competitor. I updated to the latest 3.0.2 and it fixed some of it hut its still not perfect. For $99 its not a bad buy.

          • dpaus
          • 8 years ago

          Best Buy’s 200,000 were put back on the shelves and sold out in hours. Total production run was over 750,000 and it looks like they’ll all find a home.

      • mutarasector
      • 8 years ago

      I plead the same thing Democrats said about Bush’s intelligence going into Iraq… I was *misled* (by HP’s ‘guidance’)…. 😉

      As Fonzie use to say, “I was wrr..rrr..o, er… I was wro……, <mumble> i was wro..ooo..ooong!”

    • TaBoVilla
    • 8 years ago

    I don’t get these series of recent acquisitions, mergers, companies selling off trademark divisions, etc…

    Some numbers or hidden agendas must be at play here that us, regular joes don’t know about =(

      • Thresher
      • 8 years ago

      It’s just another step in the process of moving our IT economy to service only, with hardware being either an afterthought or something that is licensed out to foreign companies.

    • sschaem
    • 8 years ago

    So what did HP get out of the 1.2billion that they paid for Palm last year ?
    1.2 billion + all the restructuring cost + all the R&D cost, and 12 month later its worth nothing.

    Mark Hurd lost HP most likely a few billions in market cap… Maybe MArk next stroke of genius is to have Oracle buy Rimm for 12 billion.

      • dragosmp
      • 8 years ago

      Development and restructuring… 2 devices in 18 months: Veer and Touchpad. One buggy variant of WebOS the 3.0 followed a few months later by the first update. It doesn’t look like HP was all in on WebOS or the hardware.

        • crsh1976
        • 8 years ago

        No they weren’t, they barely scratched the surface – they released two subpar products that could have been pretty decent, but the hardware and software was in dire need of optimization.

        It’s a shame really; despite all their tech assets and money, HP is unable to actually make anything good happen – I don’t even believe that another year of WebOS/tablet dev would have produced anything.

        So, if anything, perhaps the Palm acquisition was simply about gaining control of all those patents after all.

      • mcnabney
      • 8 years ago

      They got a bunch of patents.

      • mutarasector
      • 8 years ago

      I wouldn’t say it’s worth nothing. webOS w/its 2000 patents, most of which are for smartphones and as a percentage overall are more recent (hence currently usable, or license-able) than, say, what even Motoblurs portfolio might be (many of which are rather >ancient< and irrelavant to today’s mobile space).

      webOS might even draw 2X-3X its original purchase price of $1.7B, and be a bit of a viable viagra for an “im-patent” smartphone OEM… Maybe someone like Asus?

      • End User
      • 8 years ago

      They replaced Hurd with an enterprise guy. HP changed direction at that point.

    • maxxcool
    • 8 years ago

    BAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH!!!!!!! WARNED YOU WE DID! LISTEN YOU DID NOT!

    *NOW, HP want to make a quick buck on all your crap-web-os teblets???

    release a tool to root it and let us install android 3.x to it. Trust me. for 299, they will sell in droves if you let us re-purpose the hardware your going to abandon AND take a loss on.

      • Deanjo
      • 8 years ago

      Amen Brother.

      • Goty
      • 8 years ago

      They’ll sell even better at $100-$150.

      Oh.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    I just don’t know HP for anything other than pcs so its hard to see them supporting the culture of a successful software developement.

      • smilingcrow
      • 8 years ago

      HP’s success or otherwise in any marketplace isn’t affected by your limited perception of what they currently do; they are a massive company with many divisions and the PC division is just one. The new man in charge is a software guy which meshes with their new direction.

        • seawolf1118
        • 8 years ago

        i agree w/ smilingcrow but imho this is a step back for HP in order to move forward in different direction. needless to say, this is good news for Dell!!

          • Flatland_Spider
          • 8 years ago

          Buying Palm was a step back, and not shuttering the consumer PC division two years ago was a misstep. Killing WebOS is step forward.

        • kc77
        • 8 years ago

        Although enough people with the “limited perception” of their PC’s / Phones and Tablets are making them find a way to get rid of that side of the business. Are they not?

        HP primarily gets it’s profits from printers, then it’s server and storage division, and then engineering and support services. However, they are not unique outside of their printer business. Dell, IBM, and Oracle all offer those services and more if you really think about it.

        WebOS / Hp getting into the mobile space was about diversification of the services they provided which offers leverage against the faltering of the afore mentioned sections of their business.

        The venture into the mobile space wasn’t a dumb one. However, it’s going to take way more than a year and a half in order to break into that market which MS found out. However, it can be done. That being said the fact that they immediately put out an expensive tablet without any cachet behind it was rather stupid. No one is going to spend $500 on something from someone they haven’t’ heard of. Apple’s cachet is Apple. HTC’s, and Samsung’s is that of Android. HP’s is…………the ability to make interesting commercials that showcase the power of a green screen and After Effects. Sure they look spectacular but that’s not going to sell a $500 tablet.

      • Deanjo
      • 8 years ago

      IIRC HP makes more off of printer ink and toner then they do off of their PC business.

        • Flatland_Spider
        • 8 years ago

        The PC division is continually in the red, so the HP probably makes more off of calculators then they do on the PC division.

        Toner and ink are a gold mine though.

          • sluggo
          • 8 years ago

          PSG (the thing being spun off) accounts for 31% of HP’s revenue and 15.7 % of its profits. So yes, PSG is profitable. The PC product line (a subset of PSG) is not a reporting entity, but the people I’ve spoken to, all of whom are in a position to know, confirm that net margins for HP’s PC lines are black and significant.

    • dpaus
    • 8 years ago

    HP staffers swear they’re [url=http://thisismynext.com/2011/08/18/hp-not-walking-away-webos-exclusive-details/<]'not walking away from WebOS'[/url<]

      • Decelerate
      • 8 years ago

      I believe in that statement as much as I believe in Santa…

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        Santa brings me candy and tickles me with his sexy beard.

          • destroy.all.monsters
          • 8 years ago

          Oh so ssk was right – you are a woman!

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            of course i was right. wtf did you think? i’m always right

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 8 years ago

            lol

      • Ethyriel
      • 8 years ago

      Yeah, the more I think about it, the less it makes sense. If they’re spinning off all their hardware production, of course, slates and phones will be discontinued or the brands sold. But if they’re doing this to focus on software, why wouldn’t a big part of that be WebOS? Having a mobile OS is a big part of a software infrastructure, these days.

        • Deanjo
        • 8 years ago

        HP is trying to become IBM. It worked for them.

          • Ethyriel
          • 8 years ago

          I understand that, but a mobile platform should be viewed as a management tool, as well as a user interface for client applications.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            WebOS was simply too little way to late. It isn’t lightweight, it offers really nothing over the already well established competition. Android and iOS already have dominant position and it would take nothing short of complete colossal f*** up (or a sh**load of lawsuit losses) by those offerings to lose that position.

            • Ethyriel
            • 8 years ago

            Except none of the others have a thoroughly eloquent, well thought out interface. Android is painful to use, coming from a Pre. Windows Phone 7 looks like it might be able to step in, but it’s taking some pretty fundamental tweaking.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            I honestly didn’t think it’s UI was anything special.

            • Ethyriel
            • 8 years ago

            I feel like I’m constantly out of control with Android, like I’m at the mercy of some indecipherable set of UI conventions as to what an application is going to do anytime I decide to check an email or SMS. Things that took one swipe and tap with WebOS, I have to tap 3 or 4 times with Android, and still not be confident an application’s state will have been saved.

          • destroy.all.monsters
          • 8 years ago

          The difference being that IBM has a corporate image that actually still means something in the enterprise. HP is typically seen as an also ran in that space (which incidentally has a boatload of competitors as well).

            • Ethyriel
            • 8 years ago

            I don’t know, they seem pretty well respected in the mid-level server space, though expensive. But I’m still just a lowly desktop support guy. It does seem to me that they’ve made a lot of missteps in the higher end space over the last dozen years for this move to make a lot of sense.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            HP had a very good corporate image as did the company that they bought out years ago Compaq. Intel even used them to try to save their sinking Itanic (which I suspect now has it’s fate decided for it).

            • mutarasector
            • 8 years ago

            I’m not so sure. One does have to wonder if the HP and Oracle/Itanium dispute may not have played a larger role in all of this to a degree any of us may even be aware of.

            Think about it this way – what if HP decided the only way they’re going to be able to provide Itanium server software support for their enterprise clientele is by not counting on Oracle, but by doing it themselves? With Apotheker being a software guy, making this call was probably a tough one, but he feels that a cash infusion from a sale now (even if they take a hit on it) would allow them to rapidly realign HP towards a core competency that jibes more with his long term plan, and decreases dependency on Oracle?

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 8 years ago

      They only want people THAT ARE SERIOUS ABOUT WINNING.

      Oh the ironing.

      Who will bite? Who’s stupid enough to climb on to a dead platform that even its owner doesn’t believe in?

      Look how well Next’s “we’re only software” strategy worked for them – they were months away from implosion before Apple bought them. Steve should be sending thank you notes with chocolates every month to Gil Amelio and Ellen Hancock.

      Could I be wrong – sure. Nothing I’ve seen from HP post Hurd has made a lick of sense and they look like they’re going to be the next Digital unless they can pull their heads out of their collective sphincters.

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 8 years ago

      Insert mandatory “Of course! They’re going to go down with the ship!” comment.

    • demani
    • 8 years ago

    I wonder how the workstation market is shaking out then. Do those systems reside in the PSG group or in the Enterprise group? We have a few for rendering, Autodesk apps, etc. I wonder what vendor will replac them (they left IBM when that division was sold to Lenovo). Maybe Dell? Or maybe Boxx just got a shot in the arm?

    I am surprised that DELL doesn’t seem to have gotten a bump from this. I don’t see the PSG group retaining all of its marketshare when it changes hands, and Dell is the logical recipient of some of that transition.

    What a day…

    • Decelerate
    • 8 years ago

    Having the news simmer in my mind… if I were to declare winners, I’d say:
    -Dell won BIG on the desktop front (it’s like Christmas in August for them!)
    -Lenovo/Asus/Dell, not sure who I’d declare as winners on the notebook space.
    -Android is probably profitting from this news more than Apple (Apple’s already running at full tilt)
    -HP was never in the smartphone race (they were but a blip). No specific winners here.

    • UberGerbil
    • 8 years ago

    I don’t know who would take the PC assets (at the price HP is probably asking) unless there’s another Lenovo out there (a Chinese or Indian company looking to assume a “name’ brand from the west, though that era has probably past particularly for PCs). But I suppose eventually someone will bite: consolidation in the PC business has been inevitable for quite a while, and as we’ve seen in the past with big iron there’s still good money to be made for the last man standing.

    The webOS situation is more interesting, inasmuch as mobile is still the hot new thing and all sorts of unexpected players might be eyeing it at the right price (Palm was getting a few sniffs before HP pounced). If nothing else, there may be some IP that is valuable to somebody
    IBM (unlikely, but…)
    Intel (alternative to Meego, what’s one more?)
    Oracle (hey, it’s Ellison, anything’s possible)
    etc

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      If Google can buy Motorola Mobility, why can’t Microsoft buy HP? (rhetorical question obviously, but, I’m just sayin’….)

        • just brew it!
        • 8 years ago

        In relative terms, Google is much larger compared to Motorola Mobility than Microsoft is compared to HP.

        • maxxcool
        • 8 years ago

        Probably because it would be embarrassing to own anything consumer related to HP….

        • LaChupacabra
        • 8 years ago

        If the patents go with it, Samsung would be the company with the most to gain by buying what’s left of Palm. With those patents they would have enough to stop shipments, and potentially kill, the whole smart phone market. Some of the patents that Palm has?

        “Method and apparatus for synchronizing information on two different computer …”

        Basically this patent sync’s data between a handheld computer (smart phone) and a PC, filed in 1998

        “Apparatus and method for supplying electronic content to network appliances”

        This one specifically mentions syncing data from websites to PDA’s or phones (think cloud services)

        “System for and method of conferencing with a handheld computer using …”

        This one patents video conferencing between two handheld computers

        And the list goes on. With Apple breathing down their necks, if HP is willing to give up the intellectual property Samsung would buy it in a heartbeat.

        [url<]http://www.google.com/search?tbm=pts&tbo=1&hl=en&q=inassignee%3APalm+inassignee%3AInc&btnG=Search+Patents[/url<] (palm's patent list)

          • CuttinHobo
          • 8 years ago

          Or Apple, in their quest to take over the world, could add these patents to their repertoire. Right up there next to their patent for “An object that you look at, and/or hold.”

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            Hmm, this means Apple moves up another spot in the rankings of worlds largest PC manufacturer. Another PC manufacturer down meaning less competition for them and a easier gain in marketshare. It’s also a huge blow to MS who now lost one of their biggest OEMs.

            • Skrying
            • 8 years ago

            I’m doubtful this creates much gain for Apple in terms of units shipped. Most of HP’s consumer units were low budget options, not exactly Apple’s market. Companies buying HP business units are also unlikely to switch to Apple as it would cost significantly in numerous other areas including back end technology and training.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            Ever walk into Best Buy and the likes? Any time you remove a competitor your market share increases. It also allows the remaining competition to raise prices trying to make a few extra bucks. Fewer OEM sales also means that MS will more then likely raise their OEM license cost like they did when IBM, Packard Bell, NEC, etc got out of the business.

            • Skrying
            • 8 years ago

            Of course market share will increase, you’ve just removed someone representing a significant portion of 100%. That doesn’t tell us if the number of units shipped has increased. Dell, Toshbia, Acer, Asus, etc are all going to attack these potential customers fiercely.

            If I have five options and four of them are priced at $500 and the fifth $1000, the removal of one of those $500 options isn’t going to make me any more willing to spend $1000. I’ll just buy from my three $500 options. Apple might gain some customers from people who were considering HP’s Envy line up, but beyond that I just don’t think HP’s departure is suddenly going to result in people moving up an entire price tier.

    • flip-mode
    • 8 years ago

    They should just give the webOS to open source. There can’t possibly be any business that would want to purchase it at this point, could there?

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 8 years ago

      Dollars to donuts I’m going to bet that they’ll hold onto it for IP and patent concerns and use it as a licensing income stream.

      But yes, they should. It’d probably be the only way out for Nokia after its terrible marriage to Microsoft.

        • demani
        • 8 years ago

        Well, Apple might might be willing to through a couple bil there way for the patents.

          • destroy.all.monsters
          • 8 years ago

          Yeah and that would heat up the price considerably. Depends on if HP wants to sell or license. I imagine Apple would only be willing to buy outright.

      • Ethyriel
      • 8 years ago

      Which is why I’m about to say screw everything HP. That really pisses me off, WebOS is far from perfect, and all the hardware so far has had issues. But it’s the best phone interface to date, and they just destroyed it. Thanks HP, and so long. We weren’t a huge customer, but I’ll do everything in my power to make sure we aren’t any longer.

      Okidata desktop printers, Thinkpads, and Vostro desktops here we come.

        • destroy.all.monsters
        • 8 years ago

        On the bright side those engineers will be bound for RIM, Apple and somewhere in the Android ecosystem thereby allowing them to put food on the table.

        Had *no* idea Okidata was still around. Still using LED printing technology?

          • moog
          • 8 years ago

          My past colleagues jumped from RIM to Palm with such high hopes.

          • Ethyriel
          • 8 years ago

          Yeap, and they’re still quietly making tanks in the guise of workgroup printers.

          • Deanjo
          • 8 years ago

          Oh heck yes Oki is still around. The old microline 320 series still sell well because they pretty much have the impact printer market cornered.

            • dpaus
            • 8 years ago

            That, and the fact that they’re bullet-proof. I don’t think you could kill them even with a silver-tipped wooden stake smeared with garlic.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            Oh you can kill them but it takes a ritual that involves a young tech and an old tech.

    • bthylafh
    • 8 years ago

    Palm tech just can’t catch a break. Seems like the stuff’s contagious & it’s time to just burn it all before the infection spreads further.

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      [quote<]just burn it all before the infection spreads further[/quote<] I think the word you want is [url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4sYSyuuLk5g<]'contagion'[/url<]

        • bthylafh
        • 8 years ago

        Well, no, since I’d already said “contagious”. No need to be repetetetetive.

          • dpaus
          • 8 years ago

          Different word != redundant, or repetitive, or even saying the same thing. Anyway, I was just looking for an excuse to give everyone a 3:24 break watching an HD trailer.

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 8 years ago

      Deeply unfortunate but it does seem that way. I just think that HP’s current board is rudderless and has no idea what to do so is just casting about for anything to grab on to.

      It’s been what – six months, a year since they bought Palm’s assets? Clueless.

      This could well be the beginning of the end for HP. I don’t really think anyone there is smart enough to transform it like IBM was able to do.

      They’ll be left with what? Printers? Good luck with that. [Yes I know that they have many businesses – but their overall incompetence makes turning those diverse businesses into some kind of mosiac pretty damn unlikely]

        • bthylafh
        • 8 years ago

        Weren’t they the largest PC maker not so long ago (and maybe still)? It’ll take more than this to kill them.

          • dpaus
          • 8 years ago

          They’re still the largest ‘PC vendor’ (they outsource a lot of their manufacturing), and by a sizable margin.

          • destroy.all.monsters
          • 8 years ago

          I was referring to the trend this board has been setting. I’m not a Mark Hurd fan but these guys change their minds every six months. You’re right I don’t think that this will kill them – but I don’t see that getting out of the consumer landscape is something that they’re capable of doing successfully.

        • Flatland_Spider
        • 8 years ago

        I agree that HP is rudderless right now on the consumer side.

        HP’s consumer stuff is crap, but their business stuff is pretty good. Plus you don’t really need to create a mosaic with that stuff. As long as there aren’t explicit incompatibilities, they can operate as discrete units pretty well.

      • mutarasector
      • 8 years ago

      Reminds me of the Amiga technology being passed around like a red headed stepchild after Commodore’s demise, with Escom, Viscorp, Gateway, etc. The first two went bankrupt, and Gateway went to the Acer brands ‘stable’.

    • LSDX
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<] One wonders what Best Buy and other retailers will do with all of those excess black slates now. [/quote<] Free bootloader enabling Android or Meego maybe.

      • demani
      • 8 years ago

      You know, for the right price I could take one off their hands if there were some decent PDF apps, etc. I like tablets as dedicated service manual machines…for $100-150 I could be convinced to buy one pretty easily, even knowing it was EOL before it was OOB.

    • ludi
    • 8 years ago

    “In other news, a high-pitched, Dremel-like whine occurring seperately in two California cemetaries was investigated today, and found to be the bodies of the respective Hewlett and Packard, who were turning over in their graves in excess of 9000 RPM. This is estimated to be at least 3000 RPM faster than similar observations taken after the Fiorina ascendency.”
    -Anonymous Source

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 years ago

      Funny. (Though, technically, Bill Hewlett didn’t die until about 18 months after The Fiorina Ascendency… which, hey, wasn’t that a Robert Ludlum novel?)

    • Decelerate
    • 8 years ago

    1-The marketshare buffet is open for PC sellers.

    2-HP Tablet fanboys (I recall seeing some) just died

    3-I guess IBM had some wisdom when they agreed that this was a post-pc era (this is to all those who bashed IBM).

    4-The playing field definitely feels a lot emptyer (emptier?) now.

    This week definitely goes into the tech history books…

    I feel bad for VooDoo PC. I feel bad for WebOS (esp. the engineers who poured sweat and blood into it). Hope their dreams live on in some other form.

    Edit: “In the PC world, with fewer ways of differentiating HP’s products from our competitors, we became number one; in the tablet world we’re going to become better than number one. We call it number one plus.” -ROFLMAO, this foot-in-mouth trick is at Ballmer-esque levels

    • dpaus
    • 8 years ago

    I remember when IBM announced the sale of their PC division, and everyone called them nuts too. But it’s worked out OK…

    Still, ya gotta feel for all those people who just bought a TouchPad.

      • just brew it!
      • 8 years ago

      “Still, ya gotta feel for all those people who just bought a TouchPad.”

      What, like all 7 of them?

        • dpaus
        • 8 years ago

        Hey, I bought two of them. And thanks for the condolences….

          • destroy.all.monsters
          • 8 years ago

          I honestly hope that they decide to update and support the product for awhile – for your sake.

            • dpaus
            • 8 years ago

            Me too. But they certainly wouldn’t be the first piece of orphanware we bought for testing purposes. Hey, we have a Zenith Z-100 that still boots up!

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            Wouldn’t it be nice if they just said “F*** it, here you go guys, all remaining tablets are $200 and BTW here is an update to completely unlock them freeing you up to do what ever you want to do with them.”

            • dpaus
            • 8 years ago

            LOL, they heard you and upped the ante – they’re going for $99 and the homebrew community is working on both an unlock and a dual-boot option.

            • mutarasector
            • 8 years ago

            Still have my ‘miggy’ A1000 (w/a rejuventor board)… Haven’t booted it up in 10+ years, but it should still boot.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          you can send one to me! ♥♥♥
          NM I BOUGHT ONE

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 8 years ago

      That was a strategic decision on IBM’s part and their ship was not sinking. Big difference.

      Nor were they abandoning a business plan they had _just_ started implementing.

      • FuturePastNow
      • 8 years ago

      Another element of that sale is that Thinkpads were good enough that buyers followed them to their new home.

      I don’t think the same can be said for any computer line HP makes.

        • dpaus
        • 8 years ago

        You obviously haven’t met a WebOS fanboi yet (he said, cradling his launch-day Pre close to his defibrillating heart)

          • UberGerbil
          • 8 years ago

          Have you met another one?

            • dpaus
            • 8 years ago

            Of course!! Well….. on-line, anyway. He seems like a nice guy; lives in his Mom’s basement in Pittsburgh.

            EDIT: apparently he and I have over 750,000 friends we haven’t met yet….

      • End User
      • 8 years ago

      IBM had very strong branding with Think (ThinkPad, ThinkCentre and ThinkStation). I don’t think HP product branding is anywhere close to being that strong.

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