OCZ finalizes RevoDrive Hybrid storage sandwich

Remember the RevoDrive Hybrid we saw at Computex a couple of months ago? OCZ has finalized the HDD/SSD tag team, and it’s going to be a little pricier than expected—$500, to be exact. That buys you a notebook hard drive with a 5,400-RPM spindle speed and an even terabyte of total capacity. The drive sits atop a second-gen PCI Express x4 card packing dual SandForce 2281 SSD controllers and 128GB of 25-nm MLC NAND.

Those SandForce chips are tied together using OCZ’s proprietary SuperScale storage controller, which has RAID-like functionality and additional features pulled from the company’s Virtualized Controller Architecture (VCA). On top of that, you’ve got Nvelo’s Dataplex software. This final layer manages the relationship between the SSD and the hard drive, using the former to intelligently cache reads and writes bound for the latter.

You want numbers? Try maximum read and write speeds of 910 and 810 MB/s, respectively. The Hybrid is purportedly capable of hitting 120,000 IOps with 4KB random writes, as well.  Interestingly, OCZ is using an enterprise-style overprovisiniong percentage with the SSD component. Of the 128GB of NAND on the circuit board, 28GB is set aside for the SSD controllers. A consumer-grade SSD would typically lose 8GB to overprovisioning in that scenario.

I’m curious to see how the new RevoDrive stacks up against Intel’s Smart Response SSD caching tech. With dual SSD controllers and VCA mojo, the Hybrid would appear to have a far superior cache component. The question is whether that’s enough to make up for the relatively slow notebook hard drive.

Comments closed
    • smilingcrow
    • 8 years ago

    Operation Critical Zap

    • Chrispy_
    • 8 years ago

    Does the dataplex software run on the storage controller, or does it run on the OS?

    Unless this thing is completely self-contained (like the Momentus XT) it will lose a lot of interest.

      • ew
      • 8 years ago

      It will almost certainly not run on the controller and I’m guessing will be as buggy and unsupported as the hardware.

        • UberGerbil
        • 8 years ago

        Yeah, that was my first question and almost exactly my surmised answer.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 8 years ago

    I don’t think it’s too expensive for a 1TB 2.5″ drive, 128GB SSD all sitting on a internal RAID 0 with a PCIe x4 connector. I would pick one up for myself if it was not made by OCZ.

    $500, not bad…. OCZ, bad!!!!!

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    Another niche device that costs too much for its intended market (SFF PCs, embedded systems, thin clients)

    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    Where is my damn ram-drive?!!?

    Grrr…. I know they can’t price it at $500 if I can populate it myself with dimms of memory and it is volatile, but that would suite me perfectly fine.

    It’s interesting how the storage market is evolving though. Seagate had it’s own hybrid thing going on, which I would be more interested in then this from that perspective… they could do a lot with messing around with the caches that are native to hard drives already.

    • internetsandman
    • 8 years ago

    I must be behind on this. Is this two separate drives to an OS, or is it essentially a 1TB notebook drive with a ridiculously large cache? And do those read/write speeds apply to the device as a whole (i.e how fast the data can get from the drive/NAND to the system) or just for the stuff already stored on the NAND?

    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 8 years ago

    Make this 60gb and 7200 RPMs, and get the price below $150 and it could be interesting.

    At 128gb, you hardly need the mechanical drive anymore and what’s the point of saddling SSD with a 5200rpm drive?

      • thesmileman
      • 8 years ago

      “what’s the point of saddling SSD with a 5200rpm drive?”

      apparently you aren’t too up on this development as they have said numerous times that the 7200rpm doesn’t make any difference as long as the SSD is big enough. Now I am sure you could find one stupid situation where it does but it would be very unlikely.

        • Waco
        • 8 years ago

        All it takes is an odd workload to bring to light the slow speeds of that HDD. The cache isn’t magic.

          • Bensam123
          • 8 years ago

          Yup, what I was thinking too… You can’t predict and cache everything. Writes are easy, reads aren’t so easy to predict.

          • ImSpartacus
          • 8 years ago

          It isn’t magic? Then we better call Mr. Jobs and give him a retirement project.

    • cynan
    • 8 years ago

    Is the Dataplex software targeted more towards a boot drive or server drive? Or does it matter?

    The utility of this drive as either obviously hinges on how well this software can predict data calls. It will be interesting to see some reviews on this device to see how well this actually works, as say, a Windows boot drive.

    Until then, and additionally due to reports of bugs with previous Revo drives, I’d feel much safer getting a separate 256GB SSD boot drive and 1TB (or larger) storage drive for about the same money.

    • TravelMug
    • 8 years ago

    “it’s going to be a little pricier than expected—$500, to be exact.”

    DOA.

      • Chrispy_
      • 8 years ago

      I don’t know about DOA, It’s 1TB of SSD-like performance for around the same list price as 256GB of SSD.

      Its survival depends on just how SSD-like its performance is, and I for one am eagerly waiting for either a TR or Anand (Just about the only two websites that cover SSD reviews properly) breakdown of this thing in detail.

    • ew
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]On top of that, you've got Nvelo's Dataplex software. This final layer manages the relationship between the SSD and the hard drive, using the former to intelligently cache reads and writes bound for the latter.[/quote<] No thanks.

    • UberGerbil
    • 8 years ago

    It’s [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardcard<]HardCard[/url<], the Reboot!

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 8 years ago

    So dual SF-2281 controllers give double BSOD’s?

      • Vulk
      • 8 years ago

      Lame, and non-useful comment. Thankfully it wasn’t FIRST!

        • PrincipalSkinner
        • 8 years ago

        Yes. The first comment is the most important one. 🙂

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        Accurate joke is accurate. There’s a revolt going on in OCZ forums, it’s rather amusing to read through if you have the time.

          • flip-mode
          • 8 years ago

          one thread in particular?

            • indeego
            • 8 years ago

            [url=http://www.ocztechnologyforum.com/forum/showthread.php?91140-We-need-an-answer-from-OCZ-how-to-avoid-SSD-crashes-in-the-future<]This one.[/url<] Though OCZ might not allow offsite linking, so it's the one labelled "We need an answer from OCZ how to avoid SSD crashes in the future." But really look in the Vertex 2 forum, almost the entire thing is dead/dying drives. I'm on my third drive personally and I have no expectation it'll last the year.

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