Report: Intel to postpone Ivy Bridge by a few months

With multi-billion-dollar profits flowing in every quarter and a gross margin above 60%, Intel is the last company you’d expect to be going around pinching pennies. However, quoting folks at “PC players,” DigiTimes reports that Intel has opted to push back its 22-nm Ivy Bridge processors by a whole quarter—reportedly as a cost-cutting measure:

Intel has recently decided to delay its Ivy Bridge platform launch from the end of 2011 to March 2012, while notebook models with the new platform will start appearing in the channel in April to allow a smooth transition between the existing Sandy Bridge platform and the new platform.

The story goes on to say that Intel is mulling whether or not to postpone 22-nm upgrade plans at its Fab 24 facility in Ireland. The chipmaker had reportedly set aside $500 million for the fab upgrade earlier this year.

What’s the reasoning behind these alleged moves? According to DigiTimes, Intel has worked out that PC demand may be softer than expected next year, and it’s adjusting its plans accordingly. Interesting, if true—and also too bad for everyone hoping to upgrade to Ivy Bridge sooner rather than later.

Comments closed
    • trackerben
    • 8 years ago

    The Intel facility selected to initially produce Ivy Bridge is in Israel. Several $Billion has already been sunk in Kiryat Gat, so resiting and reallocation isn’t going to be possible for Intel’s next few quarters.

    The news is that Turkey’s pro-Islamist government has been troublesome lately. Their leaders are caught having to one-up their old ally Israel just to maintain their influence in the breaking muslim world. So they carefully force showdowns with Israel’s government just to show who is righteous boss. Or whatever. But Turkey’s leaders are now thinking of having their navy escort the next Islamist convoy past the Israeli navy’s arms blockade of rocket-happy Gaza.

    The chances of an unexpectedly bizarre conflict adding to the existing absurdities is going up, along with probable future operating and logistics costs for companies in the region. I can see how Intel’s slowing ramp-up of Ivy Bridge products may be due partly to these contingencies. These uncertainties in their supply chain will weigh in their roll-out decisions as much as marketing factors.

      • ElMoIsEviL
      • 8 years ago

      Are you by chance retarded?

      “Islamist convoy”? I’m sorry but the only convoys I’ve seen are humanitarian convoys. As for your assertion of “rocket-happy Gaza”… well although it is true that there are some militant forces (Hamas for example) that launch Rockets into illegal Israeli settlements thus possibly harming civilians the rockets themselves are (over 90% of the time) empty. They contain no explosive payloads.

      Now as for Israel… well they bomb Civilian infrastructure and practice the “collateral damage” theory (Bomb a building you know to have innocent civilians in it for a strategic advantage and then claim your target was a “terrorist”).

      This is me remaining objective. There is no “middle ground” and siding with Israel is simply illogical and irrational. We ought to side with innocent civilians, not the Palestinian Authority, Hamas or the Israeli state.

      If you look at it in terms of people, Israel slaughters a disproportionate amount of innocent civilians (both “sides” are guilty though). I would condemn the Palestinian Authority, Hamas and the State of Israel whereas you appear to support the biggest perpetrator of violence in the region (Israel).

      Why? Do the needs of the many not outweigh the needs or the few or the one? Or are you simply a bigot? I cannot understand why you would cling to this irrational world view.

        • trackerben
        • 8 years ago

        Poor Intel, and us. After decades of Islamist chatter we know how prone the Muslim world is to conspiracies, rumors, and fantasies. Ideologically-burdened cults are fortunately only a decadent leftist or fascist minority in the west. But x-Solidarity themes get posted and the unreality of extremist claims is an ongoing wonder.

        Such as how a deliberate ambush staged by militants against the boarding team of a navy engaged in a UN-recognized arms blockade can be passed off as a “humanitarian convoy”. Mavi Marmara, a ship run by an islamic charity on the watch lists, is unmatched on youtube for its “humanitarian” atmosphere of pitched CQB battles between IHH thugs and Israeli commandoes. My good friend who heads a Red Cross chapter chuckles at the sheer dissonance of it.

        Not even the drug-runners of ultraviolent Mexican cartels are so mad as to constantly fight off naval inspections. But apparently “humanitarian convoys” manned by companies of martyrdom wannabes rely on a “peaceful civilians” fiction to excuse their strategy to undo the Israeli and Egyptian arms blockade of the terror havens of Gaza. it’s all a media-driven circus which only benefits those people who regularly answer the extremists’ calls to drive Israel into the sea.

        So it appears I have encountered the anti-Zionist apologist of this forum. What am I to do? Post links to a decade’s worth of BBC, Atlantic, and Nofi articles explaining the sad history of non-Muslim communities in the middle-east ? Mention troublesome Islamists yet again displaying the usual error (and terror) of their ways? Or maybe reply with the same tendentious mockery and ad hominem?

        Talking Elmo here nicely presents the newest vulcan-themed party line – rockets without payloads. But wait, Devices without effects? A Genie without at least three gift wishes? The existential point of Arab tribal culture and its pseudo-Judeo myths is to extract wordly authority from meritorious power and might, divinely-licensed or not. Arab muslims are notorious for claiming every historical thrashing they get as a struggling victory. And yet Elmo asks us to believe this regression from character, where their dogs of war withdraw their paws? Good agitprop for soft European audiences, bad comedy for violent militants who like to boast online of their favorite antipersonnel mixes.

        At least the Israelis try to adhere to western ideas of minimizing civilian casualties. No army would bother with the difficulty of mastering precision strikes if targeting distinctions were not essential to its doctrine of warfare. The common Israeli refrain “what would the gentiles/infidels/westerners think?” is alien to the mentality behind the wildly indiscriminate terror attacks targeting Israeli populations by design. Islamist militants rarely bother to discriminate between combatants and non-combatants, and then only because they need to appeal to the enlightened mores of the modern gobal civilization which does.

        • mutarasector
        • 8 years ago

        You, sir, are an islamofacist shill.

    • DavidC1
    • 8 years ago

    Whoever that said this:

    32nm PD-SOI: GF
    22nm bulk: Intel

    Ok, call that if it makes you comfortable. I mean you should do things that make you comfortable, even if it might not make sense as long as it doesn’t bother anyone else right?

    But for everyone else, 22nm Tri-Gate use a full-depleted structure. It doesn’t use “FD-SOI” but the “FD” part exists, so its the same thing. So whatever paper advantages they might have had with PD-SOI is completely reversed in favor of Intel. Even back with bulk and no High-K they had the best process so imagine with everything there.

    2-3 months delay is really hard to say if its a manufacturing problem. Considering the development time, its either later in the cycle or a strategic decision. They even said SoC process on 22nm would lag regular one by 3 months so it might just be Ivy Bridge is on a SoC process anyway.

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      Actually, Hattig said 32nm FD-SOI; I corrected him pointing out that it’s actually PD-SOI, but got punished with a thumbdown for daring to suggest that something AMD related is not as good as someone says.

    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    This is bad, somehow I’m sure this is tied to AMD posing no real concern or competition, which means Intel is probably thinking it can relax and take a breather. This isn’t just a financial issue…

    If I were to dig into this a bit, this highlights that if AMD goes under then Intel will show no real concern for pushing the industry forward. They’ll just play the part of the stereotypical corporation looking to gobble up profits at any cost, especially if they have a monopoly.

    Perhaps this is good and bad as it gives AMD time to catch up, but at this point I’m sure it’s not just goodwill on Intels part and they have their next killer processor already ready to go, so if AMD does release something they can trump it immediately. So right now that means this is along the lines of Intel stringing AMD out so they wont go out of business and they have some sort of ‘competition’ to avoid being classified as a monopoly.

    Maybe I’m the only one that shows genuine concern over something like this? There really isn’t any way in this day and age we will ever see another corporation capable of competing with Intel or AMD processors. They are years ahead financially, talent, technology, and experience wise of anyone that would want to enter this market. Once one goes down, it’s game over. The only hail marry is if a government decided to step in and produce their own (very unlikely) or split Intel up as it did other companies in the past that gained monopolies (also very unlikely in this day and age with lobbying).

    • Farting Bob
    • 8 years ago

    Milk the current gen CPU’s more, they are still way better than the competition and pretty fresh. When you have a commanding lead and basically competing with yourself in the majority of price points it makes sense to hold back, wait for the yields to really improve and then crank out 22nm of awesome.

    Also, to me this press release should have been titled “We know Bulldozer wont beat SB designs so arent going to rush IB out”.

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      Who knows – they might be delaying IB to be able to focus more on getting a 22nm Atom out the door to start pursuing the cell phone market.

    • beck2448
    • 8 years ago

    They have billions in cash, no debt, and dominate every market. I’m sure its just out of kindness for AMD to keep them breathing.

      • Farting Bob
      • 8 years ago

      They dominate the x86 market (desktop, laptop and server). They have no real presence in the smartphone, dumbphone or “laptop without a keyboard” markets, and those are the ones that are growing, not desktops.

        • Bensam123
        • 8 years ago

        Yet the desktop market is a venerable juggernaut. Just because it’s not experiencing growth doesn’t mean it’s not gigantic to begin with.

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    The real reason is because the mainstream market already has powerful enough desktops and laptops for their needs. It has been the case for years, it just finally had caught up in the bargain basement segments.

    The demand for faster CPUs is shrinking, the only market that has a constant need for it is the enterprise segments. Intel is giving them Sandy-Bridge-E to satisfy their needs. Sandy-Bridge-E is going to outclass IB at CPU-related tasks (cache and # of cores matter).

      • lycium
      • 8 years ago

      “The demand for faster CPUs is shrinking, the only market that has a constant need for it is the enterprise segments.” [citation needed]

      I guess scientific computing and computer graphics aren’t real industries anyway.

        • Krogoth
        • 8 years ago

        They are found under the enterprise segments……

        • Bensam123
        • 8 years ago

        And R&D for universities is a huge market? Don’t get me wrong, they spend a lot on buying the latest and greatest, but compared to the world of users making decent sized purchases?

        Graphics have been consolized as far as the market is concerned. There is no demand there anymore because they turned it into a chicken and a egg scenario.

          • lycium
          • 8 years ago

          R&D? Universities? Mate, we’re just running rendering software and 3ds max, not trying to research anything…

      • indeego
      • 8 years ago

      You are 100% right.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        I feel dirty saying it, but I agree.

      • Bensam123
      • 8 years ago

      I’m going to iterate how terribly sad this is since no one has sad anything like this. It shows a lack of innovation in the software industry and a general plateau has been reached as far as development goes.

      I know some might disagree, but I think this is WHOLLY connected to video games becoming consolized. I think there was a huge motivational factor in there for both AMD and Intel for being able to drive something faster and have a bunch of people brag about it. Fanbois and die hards who would vouche for your processors and showed pride as far as what they had inside because it really could run things faster. Who did the Blue Man Group target? It wasn’t corporations. Once multithreading hit almost no developers took advantage of it as far as games go and even now, years after it first showed up in the consumer market, developers aren’t playing with it beyond what consoles employ by default.

      I mean this can be seen by the fact that they developed core specific automatic overclocking because so many programs don’t take advantage of more the one core, so it’s more advantageous in a lot of scenarios to have one faster core.

      Someone really needs to make a game to end all games. There needs to be a juggernaut in the software industry that everyone looks to for entertainment and even though I love Google, it’s not web browsing or farmville.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        The perceived lack of multi-threaded games (which pretty much everything released now does use two cores) is two things:

        1.) Not related to consoles. The Xbox 360 can process 3 threads at once, and the PS3 can do 7 (well, 6 are all that’s available to a game). If anything, the multi-core game consoles should be pushing developers to up the thread count. This tells me the problem is somewhere else – and it’s more about what they can do with useful threads that don’t rely on another one.

        2.) Not a factor in why Ivy Bridge would be delayed. The “high-end” PC games market that demands expensive GPUs and CPUs to match is a very small market compared to any other sector of the PC market.

          • Bensam123
          • 8 years ago

          “…developers aren’t playing with it beyond what consoles employ by default.”

          There is multithreading, it’s just largely limited to one or two extra threads.

          The whole issue I was talking about wasn’t just about Ivy Bridge, it’s about the direction the industry has been heading as a whole. Ivy is just a symptom. Impact of one part of the market can be completely different from another even if the size is disproportional.

      • ish718
      • 8 years ago

      I’m hoping microsoft has figured out ways to effectively utilize more cores with windows 8, but I’m very skeptical…

    • mcforce0208
    • 8 years ago

    The main reason why Ivy Bridge is being delayed is because Intel knows bulldozer is going to be even more powerful than their up coming chips. Intel are forced to delay these chips in order to squeeze more performance out of them, in order to be competitive.

    Man, i wish this was the case!!!

      • Beelzebubba9
      • 8 years ago

      If only. 🙁

      • PrincipalSkinner
      • 8 years ago

      Nice one!

    • ronch
    • 8 years ago

    AMD, opportunity knocks.

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      It knocked with the botched SB chipset thingy, too, but AMD ended up delaying Llano and BD.

        • ronch
        • 8 years ago

        And they did take advantage of that foul-up with their ‘Ready, Willing and Stable’ marketing campaign, albeit with not much success. People knew better.

    • smilingcrow
    • 8 years ago

    Ivy Bridge would be very useful for Ultrabooks so rather than giving first dibs on a new CPU to Apple why not release IB for Ultrabooks first?
    If Ultrabooks were released in January with exclusive use of IB that would give the platform some good initial cachet and help to establish the ‘platform’. Possibly not feasible due to low volumes though!

    Is one of the reasons that IB is delayed due to the Sandy Bridge chipset issue?
    This is very old news anyway and when I read it I figured that it had been delayed beyond the March/April timeframe which suggested they had some serious issues.

      • willmore
      • 8 years ago

      Or they already promised Apple an exclusive….

      • indeego
      • 8 years ago

      [quote<]Is one of the reasons that IB is delayed due to the Sandy Bridge chipset issue?[/quote<] Highly doubt it. The issue was very small and easily fixed. It was only channel backlog that caused the delay. The delay was smaller than they claimed it would be, as well.

    • Malphas
    • 8 years ago

    Why bother upgrading when you can just milk out your existing product some more, while your competition fumbles around uselessly?

    • Hattig
    • 8 years ago

    This delay has been known about for some time, and is clearly related to 22nm manufacturing troubles (and note that if it’s difficult for Intel, then it’s going to be even worse for the other players when they get there), but without a viable competitor Intel can say strange things like “smooth transition” and “soft demand”.

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      It might be related to the manufacturing troubles, but some reports are implying it’s related to Ivy Bridge changes instead. So, we really don’t know…

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        [url<]http://semiaccurate.com/2011/09/01/intels-ivy-bridge-delay-rumors-are-laughable/[/url<] Charlie says the March 2012 has been the target date for some six months now, but the interesting tidbit is this: "That isn't to say there aren't delays though, lately the rumor mill has been saying that [b<]there are fresh new delays to a post March timeframe.[/b<] Some of these rumors say that Ivy Bridge will be delayed by about a month, other say it is closer to a quarter, probably Computex for the launch. Both sets of rumors point to the same problem, 22nm process problems, and both have one thing in common, they are not confirmed." So, I guess Hattig was right.

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 8 years ago

    Sounds like the lack of competition and the slowing of laptop sales in the face of the perception that we’re in a supposed post-PC world now thanks to the iPad (and apparently ONLY the iPad)’s great success are leading Intel to delay in the hope of making more money off something already done and easily made.

    It’s a shame, though, because I’d love to see Bulldozer’s performance and see what we MIGHT be in store for with Trinity. Llano proved the concept can work with a low-end CPU. Now let’s see a better performing part.

    That said, as long as AMD delays, Intel has no reason to release anything. They’ve lapped AMD several times over in performance currently, save possibly for the low-end, integrated GPU market.

    • ew
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]multi-billion-dollar profits flowing in every quarter and a gross margin above 60%, Intel is the last company you'd expect to be going around pinching pennies.[/quote<] Or maybe pinching pennies is how they got in this situation to begin with.

      • Farting Bob
      • 8 years ago

      You make a good point. A successful business is one that no matter how much money it makes, doesnt waste any. Surviving when so many businesses are building up debts or going under involves being as efficient as possible. Even a 1% saving in your production costs can make a big difference when times are hard.

      • sluggo
      • 8 years ago

      Mr. Grove’s book title – “Only The Paranoid Survive”

    • cwditter
    • 8 years ago

    Weren’t these reports out like……..a month ago? I’ve known Ivy Bridge wasn’t coming till March for about a month but I can’t remember where I heard it

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      [url<]http://semiaccurate.com/2011/05/30/bulldozer-and-ivy-bridge-both-delayed-a-bit/[/url<]

    • chuckula
    • 8 years ago

    Wasn’t this delay already known for some time?

    Additionally, the story about the Irish Fab is a bit overblown. Intel is bringing 5 fabs online for 22nm production in 2012… that’s 1 more fab than it already has for the mature 32 nm process right now, and that has nothing to do with the Irish Fab. There were rumors that the Irish fab would be upgraded as a 6th 22 nm fab, but Intel never announced it. So in summary: Intel will have more 22 nm fabs running in 2012 than all of its existing 32 nm fabs that have been opened in either 2010 or 2011.

    • Elsoze
    • 8 years ago

    If only AMD could release FX in time to take advantage of such an opportunity………..

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      that’s the exact reason for the delay. why push out a new product when you’re already years ahead of the competition? wait, let them launch, and the sell your new one, which will be faster. it makes perfect sense. it’s too bad amd can’t get their cpu devision working like the gpu.

        • yogibbear
        • 8 years ago

        I think this is the first time I am giving you a +1. *Tips hat in your general direction and nods approvingly*

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 8 years ago

        That doesn’t make sense. Bulldozer would compete against Sandy Bridge E/EN/EX, not Ivy Bridge.

        Ivy Bridge doesn’t really have a lot to do with competition. It pretty much just lops the size of their highest volume chips in half, which should save them money down the road [b<]if[/b<] the demand is there to justify the cost of entry. Unfortunately, due to the astronomical costs of new manufacturing processes, they don't seem to think it will. Now if they delayed Haswell once 22nm was already up and running, then that would be something, but that's not the case here.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          that depends on when it launches. it might be that bulldozer goes toe to toe with ivy bridge. what incentive is there for intel to increase the top end, again, when there is nothing close to competing? it DOES cost money to make these chips, and if they can make more money waiting until there is SOME competition, then launch, that’s exactly what they’re going to do.

            • OneArmedScissor
            • 8 years ago

            Ivy Bridge is for laptops and desktops, and it’s not the high end, Sandy Bridge E is.

            Bulldozer is for multi-socket servers, including a dual-die chip that will eat most of the production, with scraps left over for what is pretty much just the tiny proportion of the already tiny DIY desktop market that might still want a “high end, but not really” AMD CPU over Intel.

            There is no competition here. Ivy Bridge was never meant to best anything, and Bulldozer was never meant to be some sort of driving force in the PC market.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            what about the inevitable ivy bridge E

          • chuckula
          • 8 years ago

          [quote<]Bulldozer would compete against Sandy Bridge E/EN/EX, not Ivy Bridge.[/quote<] Uh... not according to AMD it won't. I'd go look at AMD's own marketing slides here: [url<]http://vr-zone.com/articles/amd-bulldozer-details-start-to-trickle-out/11579.html[/url<] before you say that Bulldozer is only, or even primarily, positioned against Sandy Bridge E.

        • Saribro
        • 8 years ago

        AMD’s GPU division can fight with equal manufacturing weapons as their competitor, AMD’s CPU division cannot.

        • mutarasector
        • 8 years ago

        I’m not so certain AMD’s schedule has much to do with Ivy Bridge’s arrival, and this is purely a coincidence, or incidental at best.

        My bet is it that it is pretty much as the article says, and worldwide market conditions/economic factors are the real significant factors in this decision. Think about this, the PC market is nearly flatlining, even as Apple’s Mac sales are up, what? 14%-15%? And right about the end of Narch, Apple is likely due for a refresh, no? Sounds to me, this delay is perfectly timed by design for those reasons more than anything.

        It may also be that Intel is trying to buy the extra time to work on Ivy Bridge’s power efficiency so as to not lose Apple to AMD’s Trinity like Nvidia did to AMD’s Radeon?

          • NeelyCam
          • 8 years ago

          [quote<]It may also be that Intel is trying to buy the extra time to work on Ivy Bridge's power efficiency so as to not lose Apple to AMD's Trinity like Nvidia did to AMD's Radeon?[/quote<] You're joking, right? Do you [i<]really[/i<] think Trinity has a chance of competing with Ivy Bridge in power efficiency? Keep in mind that Trinity is in non-trigate 32nm, while Ivy Bridge is in tri-gate 22nm..

            • Hattig
            • 8 years ago

            Trinity is 32nm FD-SOI, Ivy Bridge is tri-gate 22nm bulk. We’ll see how they compare then they’re both available, although on past performance I would imagine that Intel should have lower power consumption.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            No; GloFo 32nm is PD-SOI (just like 45nm), not FD-SOI. (FD-SOI might come in 20/22nm, but the latest report implies it doesn’t.)

            Moreover, Intel’s 32nm bulk and GloFo’s 32nm PD-SOI are roughly equal in power efficiency. SOI reduces parasitics, thus lowering power consumption. On the other hand, if you look at IEDM 32nm process papers (or David Kanter’s round-up), you’ll see that Intel’s bulk 32nm has higher drive currents than GloFo’s 32nm PD-SOI process. The main reason for this is that Intel’s gate-last approach translates into higher-performing transistors (better strain optimization).

            Active power efficiency is strongly related to the drive current (high drive current -> smaller device needed -> less capacitance -> lower power). So, on the same node (32nm), the two are comparable, but Intel’s 22nm is expected to be quite a bit more power efficient – not only because of shorter gate length (-> more drive current and lower parasitic capacitance), but also because of the tri-gate transistor topology.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            Why -1? If I’m wrong somehow, please let me know.

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        This is a very dangerous gamble. If AMD came out of nowhere with a home-run and Intel was left sitting there, AMD could gain significant traction, as they did in the server market when 64-bit Opterons were the rage.

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      [url<]http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/cpu/display/20110831102650_AMD_s_Highly_Anticipated_Bulldozer_Chips_Might_Face_Further_Delay.html[/url<]

        • mutarasector
        • 8 years ago

        Trinity vs. Ivy Bridge would be a more balanced and timely comparison, no? Word is Trinity is actually considerably ahead of schedule.

        [-4?!?! For asking a >question<?]

          • Hattig
          • 8 years ago

          Indeed the current rumours are that Trinity will get a CES introduction, but availability is another thing entirely. However it probably won’t be wildly dissimilar to Ivy Bridge given IB’s delay. AMD have a massive incentive to get Trinity out ASAP to replace Llano at the high end in early 2012. However it remains to be seen how four Piledriver cores match up to four IB cores, given the latter has hyper-threading. The on-board graphics will whip IB though.

          • maroon1
          • 8 years ago

          AMD have already released Llano. So, don’t expect Trinity to be out any anytime before Q3 or even Q4 2012

          It is too early to compare Trinity to ivy bridge which is supposed to be out in March 2012

            • mutarasector
            • 8 years ago

            Given AMD’s track record of delays, you may be correct. However, AMD has given more positive affirmations of a Q1 release for Trinity. I guess we’ll see…

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