Release roundup: An IPS panel, roomy tower case, and more

This week in our roundup of miscellaneous release announcements: high-capacity solid-state drives from Corsair, a full-tower case from Lian-Li, and a 24" professional display from NEC.

  • Corsair announces availability of high-capacity Force Series GT SSDs. Corsair’s Force Series GT SSDs are now available with 180GB and 240GB capacity, with price tags of $379 and $489, respectively. Just like their 90GB sibling, the drives feature SandForce SF-2280 controllers and 6Gbps Serial ATA connectivity. (The company quotes top transfer speeds of 555MB/s for reads and 525MB/s for writes.) The drives also ship with 3.5" adapters, so you can stick ’em in a desktop without duct tape or a dedicated 2.5" bay.

  • Lian Li launches full-tower PC-90. This new Lian Li case is a strange animal. The front of the enclosure is devoid of 3.5" drive bays; instead, the 12 drive bays (six 3.5" and six 2.5") are laid flat on a panel that sits above the motherboard. Thanks to the space freed at the front, Lian Li says the PC-90 supports motherboards with an HPTX form factor (13.6" x 15") without requiring a large chassis. Other features include dual 140-mm front fans and a "tool-less graphics card holder," to help steady unusually long graphics cards.

  • NEC advances its MultiSync P Series monitors with next gen 24-inch display. Professional monitors aren’t for everybody, but NEC is certainly no stranger to that market. Its latest display, which has a 24" panel size and a 1920×1200 resolution, features an e-IPS panel with an sRGB color gamut and an 8-ms response time. NEC mentions a typical contrast ratio of 1000:1 and typical brightness of 360 cd/m², as well. The display has DisplayPort, dual DVI, and VGA inputs in addition to a USB hub, and it has a healthy helping of professional functionality, including ICC profile emulation for "quick access to alternate color spaces." This bad boy will be available in September for $749, or $1249 if you want the version with a bundled color calibrator.

That Lian Li case looks interesting, although after my experience with Silverstone’s Raven RV03, I’m left wondering if perhaps the bay arrangement could leave drives starved for airflow. The Raven does have a different design, though, since it places drive bays directly behind the motherboard.

Comments closed
    • cygnus1
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<] The display has DisplayPort, dual DVI, and VGA inputs [/quote<] Why would it have dual DVI? Do they really plan for people to swap between two different DVI inputs?

      • smilingcrow
      • 8 years ago

      If you have a desktop with DVI and a laptop with HDMI then having 2 DVI inputs is handy.

      • Farting Bob
      • 8 years ago

      Im guessing DVI is cheap to implement in a monitor (same as VGA, which is why the cheapest monitors today still come with VGA only connections) so having 2 of them wont hurt.

        • cygnus1
        • 8 years ago

        I guess if it’s cheap enough to implement an extra DVI input and it gives them a perceived marketing advantage, why not. I just can’t see that many people switching between two different DVI (or converted HDMI) inputs. It doesn’t make sense for a single system with dual display output, and I would think people with two systems and a $750 monitor would just get a KVM switch…

        I just really don’t see a common usage scenario

          • smilingcrow
          • 8 years ago

          If you want to occasionally connect a laptop or games console having an extra DVI/HDMI cable permanently connected is more convenient than unplugging your desktop. It’s not exactly an uncommon usage!

      • yogibbear
      • 8 years ago

      Plug in your PC and your PS3 maybe?

      • liquidsquid
      • 8 years ago

      Dual DVI is a standard SINGLE connector with two sets of DVI signals bundled together to increase bandwidth so you don’t need two cables and two jacks. That is what I have on both the video card and monitor. It was slightly pre-display port.

        • kroker
        • 8 years ago

        Yes but that is used for very high resolution monitors (2560 x 1600 @ 60Hz). For 1920 x 1200 @ 60Hz, single DVI and even VGA is enough. I’m pretty sure the intention here is to be able to plug more than one system, not higher bandwidth. And frankly I don’t see what the problem is, 2 x VGA on my old 21″ Trinitron monitor has proven very useful.

        • smilingcrow
        • 8 years ago

        It’s called Dual Link DVI not Dual DVI so that people don’t confuse the two; they do anyway.

          • jihadjoe
          • 8 years ago

          +1 for you, sir.

          And the monitor in question has two of those dual-link DVI connections.
          Dual Dual-Link DVI! zomg!

            • Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
            • 8 years ago

            Thx for the research.

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]The drives also ship with 3.5" adapters, so you can stick 'em in a desktop without duct tape or a dedicated 2.5" bay.[/quote<] If your 3½" bays are bottom mount, like the drive trays in many current Antec cases, you'll need to drill some holes in the supplied Corsair bracket. It's only set up to install screws from the sides. One of my Corsair Force F120 drives is in California being replaced on RMA right now. 🙁

    • Farting Bob
    • 8 years ago

    A new monitor with 1920×1200 resolution? Praise the Lord! Semi-pro one though, not exactly in my price range.

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 years ago

      It’s actually a pretty reasonable price for that class of monitor, assuming the specs are good.

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        yah. nec is a damn good monitor producer.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 8 years ago

          Yup, those Nips make some good electronics.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 8 years ago

            Sweet, -5 so far. Do people not even know what NEC used to stand for?

            Y SO SERIOUS??

          • Sahrin
          • 8 years ago

          My first monitor was an NEC MultiSync FE791SB. To this day remains the best image monitor I’ve ever owned. Great deal, too.

            • LoneWolf15
            • 8 years ago

            I remember when the FG-series NEC CRTs were drooled over by geekdom.

        • LoneWolf15
        • 8 years ago

        Agreed. I remember when Dell’s 2407WFP and 2408WFP-HC cost that much.

      • mcnels1
      • 8 years ago

      The new Dell U2412M is 1920×1200, e-IPS, and $399. It only has 6-bit color though.

        • DarkUltra
        • 8 years ago

        Dell U2412M also have the same 8ms gtg response time. But don’t decide on a display on specs alone, read some reviews.

        I wonder if they would release a 120hz display for professional use. The extra update rate greatly improves mouse precision makes it easier to work with applications.

          • jihadjoe
          • 8 years ago

          AFAIK there are no 120Hz IPS panels.

          Refresh rate is a function of response time. 8ms GTG (the norm for IPS) means about 16ms for full black-to-white, which is just barely enough for 60Hz (16.67ms).

          For 120Hz, you need to be able to do black-to-white in half that time, or 8.33ms. Right now, TN is the only panel technology that cheaply will do that sort of response time, so we’re forced into a choice: good color (IPS) or fast response/3D capability (TN).

            • crazybus
            • 8 years ago

            LG makes a number of 120Hz IPS panels, but they’re intended for HDTVs. [url<]http://www.lgdisplay.com[/url<]

        • jihadjoe
        • 8 years ago

        It’s 8 bit. TN is 6-bit.

        I think you’re getting confused a bit because the lower-end models don’t have the same color depth as their top models (3011, 2711), but in this case the top-models have 10-bit color, and the midrange e-IPS models have 8 bit.

      • Vaughn
      • 8 years ago

      I’m on a HP Z24w 1920×1200 8 bit IPS panel and I paid $459

      Doesn’t have the other professional features this nec has but I also don’t need them.

        • Tumbleweed
        • 8 years ago

        Yeah, I’ve got the HP zr24w at home and work and love it to death.

        • kroker
        • 8 years ago

        HP ZR24W here too and I love it. The only small disappointment with this monitor is somewhat poor blacks.

        NEC claims a contrast ratio of 1000:1 which is pretty good if true.

      • liquidsquid
      • 8 years ago

      It is a lot of resolution on a small-ish monitor. Had trouble seeing text on my 27″ monitor until I cranked font size on everything.

        • kroker
        • 8 years ago

        1920×1200 is small for 24″? What do you think of 22″ 1920×1080 monitors then? I have one at work and I’m fine with it. If you want larger pixels you’ll probably want to buy an LCD TV.

        But yeah, I like big fonts too, I use page zooming in Firefox for all sites because I like to sit back and read text comfortably.

          • UberGerbil
          • 8 years ago

          The monitor on my secondary machine is 2048×1152 @ 23″ That’s about as high a DPI as I’d be comfortable with.
          (My elderly mother, on the other hand, loves her 19″ 1280×1024)

        • thecoldanddarkone
        • 8 years ago

        I haven’t used a 27 inch monitor, but I do know the font is smaller than the 30inchers that I have used. I would be uncomfortable with a 27 inch. The font on the 24 inch is perfect, I keep it set at default and it’s easy to read. I’ve been very happy with the 24 inch 16:10 monitors@ 1920×1200.

    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    I <3 Lian Li for actually reorganizing their cases in a way that reduces their footprints, but why HPTX? I somehow think this was a compromise between marketing that needed something new to fling at consumers and engineers that were trying to design a really small case.

    If you look at it, with that layout they could’ve went for a normal ATX motherboard and cut roughly six inches off the cases height wise(!).

    Now that would’ve been a small bad ass case. It’s interesting I’ve owned a Lian-Li 60B I think it is since they came out in 2004 and I’ve never had a reason to change it because it simply worked. Now I sorta want a new case and I’m stuck between getting something a lot smaller, like this or going with something new age that just feels different, like the Corsair 650. I do love anodized black steel.

      • moriz
      • 8 years ago

      the design of the case won’t allow any differences in height, but in length. after all, it only shifted the position of the hard drive bays.

      it also differs pretty significantly from the raven rv3’s hard drive mounts, because while the raven’s hard drives are positioned behind the motherboard tray and thus far away from any air flow, the PC-90’s HDD mounts are above the motherboard and thus more in line with the airflow from the two front fans. it doesn’t have anywhere near the same airflow to the HDDs as a normal case, but this is a fairer compromise compared to the raven.

      also, it opens up the two front intakes directly to the video card(s) something that probably require better cooling than HDDs ever would. not to mention, in the age of SSDs and slower, green HDDs, airflow to the drives are not nearly as important.

        • Bensam123
        • 8 years ago

        HPTX uses longer motherboards. If they designed it around normal ATX motherboards which almost everyone has it would’ve eliminated a bunch of space on the bottom.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 8 years ago

      Lian-Li is horrible at reorganizing cases to reduce footprints. Just look at any of their mATX cases, they are the size of ATX midtowers from other companies, especially in depth. When will they realize small depth is critical and vertical space is cheap, not the other way around?

        • rechicero
        • 8 years ago

        That depends. For me, vertical space is limited, depth or width aren’t.

      • Starfalcon
      • 8 years ago

      Yeah, I am still rocking an PC-70 I got back in the late 90’s…I just wish Lian-Li would re-release it again. It a shame after all this time I just cant find a case with as much room and drive bays any more. Ive had 6 different computer rigs in this case and I am sure I will have quite a few more in the future.

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