Windows 8 to cut boot times dramatically

Judging by our latest poll, nearly half of TR readers still shut down their PC when it’s not in use. Those folks will no doubt be happy to hear that, with Windows 8, Microsoft will reduce boot times substantially.

The company says it has implemented a "fast startup mode" that’s a "hybrid of traditional cold boot and resuming from hibernate." User sessions are closed, just like during a traditional shutdown, but the kernel session is hibernated. That kernel session has a small memory footprint, so it can be written to the disk and loaded back into memory at startup much quicker than a traditional hibernation dump, which includes user data and is "sized by default at 75% of physical RAM." (Kernel-only dumps, by comparison, are "typically" only 10-15% as large as the amount of physical RAM in the system.)

The result on systems with solid-state drives is quite remarkable, as you can see below:

Users will still have the option of doing a full shutdown or reboot if they so choose. Nevertheless, the new, fast shutdown mode will purportedly still "freshen up" drivers and initialize new devices, so even enthusiasts who often tinker with hardware might be able to use it more often than not.

Check out the full MSDN blog post by Microsoft’s Gabe Aul for more details about the new startup mode.

Comments closed
    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    Wow this was so amazing, then I noticed when it finished booting a giant menu system popped up on the left.

    On a more serious note, it is probably just a variant of hibernate mixed with a really fast SSD. I would like to see how fast it does a complete reboot. As in it’s in windows and you click reboot.

      • d0g_p00p
      • 8 years ago

      How was the laptop hibernating when the battery was pulled out?

        • smilingcrow
        • 8 years ago

        Hibernate uses storage not RAM so no battery is required.

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 years ago

      [quote<]it is probably just a variant of hibernate [/quote<]Which is exactly what the article said.

        • Bensam123
        • 8 years ago

        Ah, I read part of the article… I suppose I was confused by it being labeled as ‘fast startup mode’ instead of ‘hibernate’. One being more akin to a cold boot… they even took out the battery to show it wasn’t using memory…

        Which makes it seem even less appealing. I don’t know of many people that would purposefully unplug or remove the power from their computer JUST to set the circumstances to make this more appealing… Meaning everyone usually has power attached to their computer in the form of a battery or power cable so there really is no reason to accelerate this set of circumstances.

        If they’re doing a hibernate fast startup, they should’ve just improved standby.

          • UberGerbil
          • 8 years ago

          You completely missed the point. It has nothing to do with removal of the battery being any kind of use case. They removed the battery to show that this mode doesn’t require any battery power (unlike sleep) yet it is almost as fast to wake as sleep (which does consume battery power).

          “Fast startup” is a perfectly reasonable term for this. Like a normal statup (cold boot), the user state isn’t preserved from the last session. Like normal startupt, drivers are initialized. Unlike a cold boot, there isn’t a full (and slow) PnP device enumeration. Unlike a cold boot, the code pages for the system (kernel, all the system DLLs, etc) aren’t loaded and initialized from their various images but are streamed out of the hiberfile.

          In addition, they claim they’ve improved loading from the hiberfile by parallelizing the reads and decompression to take advantage of multicores. That would improve normal restore-from-hibernate even more (because more data is read) but should speed this mode as well.

          Now, there are a bunch of potential issues that will probably cause this not to work (or have other consequences) — hardware changes while the machine is shut down, pending OS patches that have been downloaded but need a reboot for installation, etc. On the other hand, this should be more reliable than straight hibernation in some cases, since potentially unreliable apps aren’t in the picture.

          Overall, it’s not going to change the world for anybody, but it may be a handy alternative for mobile users who are often operating away from a power socket for extended periods and right now are forced to choose between using some battery life on sleep or enduring slow cold boots.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            It isn’t a cold boot. It’s a sleep/hibernate mode. It’s completely different and that was the point of my original post. That’s also why I said I would like to see how fast a reboot is from inside windows.

            I use sleep already and my computer wakes up just as fast. Replacing “shutdown” with “hibernate” and naming it something else doesn’t change anything. Everything that applies to hibernate now still applies to this mode, as you outlined yourself.

    • BlackStar
    • 8 years ago

    10 seconds is still 7 seconds too slow. Maybe in half a decade we’ll finally reach parity with 1985 boot speeds again.

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      Drop the nostalgic glasses.

      Systems used to take a while to boot-up back in the day. Loading up a program on floppies (5 1/4″ diskettes) was painfully slow and loud.

        • UberGerbil
        • 8 years ago

        Have to agree with Krogoth here. I well remember sitting around waiting for machines to boot up in 1985 — especially since programs in those days crashed so frequently, and took the whole machine with them; doing program documentation a couple of years later, I kidded my manager about measuring my productivity in reboots-per-hour.

        And reboots were [i<]sloooow[/i<]. You'd sit and watch the memory count up -- even though you had less than 640K, the CPU was just a few MHz so it took a long time, and there was no quick memtest option in the BIOS. Then you'd wait as it checked the floppy drive(s) for a disk, which took a while even if they were empty. But usually there was something in there because a [url=https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=824947#p824947<]20MB HD cost a thousand dollars[/url<] so we booted DOS from floppies. Slowly. Each of those steps was tens of seconds. Any boot that took under a minute was pretty good. Heck, I could go get my Apple ][+ out of storage and time a boot for you (assuming the floppy drive still works). Even though it didn't do a memtest or really have any BIOS checks, I can guarantee you it took more than 10 seconds. A lot more.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 8 years ago

          I think he’s thinking more of the old Commodores which booted instantly to…err…a BASIC prompt. Hardly user-friendly.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            Commodores took bloody ages to load up anything.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            No – they took bloody ages to load up anything that wasn’t compressed, because the cassette tapes were disgustingly slow. Once you loaded compressed stuff it was pretty fast. I remember my favorite snooker game taking two seconds to load.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            I only ran a Commodore 128 back in the day. The basic OS did come up fast, but once you start to load any program it took a while to get it going. To make worse, the larger programs require you to swap floppies (5 1/4″ diskettes) and you hope that they didn’t go bad on you.

            • BlackStar
            • 8 years ago

            My bloody 8086 IBM-PC booted faster than a i5 with a SSD. That’s just sad.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            It is clear that you haven’t touch a 8086 in years.

            The only reason that would boot fast is because there was nothing to load up. FYI, you can do the same thing with a modern system. The 8086 shows its age, once you start loading up programs and drivers.

      • ludi
      • 8 years ago

      If you want a machine that features 1985-grade hardware and DOS capabilities, go wild. Advance your way forward to 1991 and you can even play Duke Nukem, but it’s not 3D.

        • ImSpartacus
        • 8 years ago

        When will we get to play Duke Nukem in 3D?

        • BlackStar
        • 8 years ago

        No, I want a 2011-grade machine that boots instantly.

        Thanks for missing the point.

          • Krogoth
          • 8 years ago

          So you want a system that is functionality useless?

          That’s pretty easy, just throw a barebones CLI OS and some low-level firmware.

          Don’t complain to me that you can do little, other then coding your own stuff.

            • BlackStar
            • 8 years ago

            No, I want a fully functional system that boots up fast. I want a BIOS that gets out of the way and doesn’t take 10” to enumerate devices. 1” should be more than enough for a modern laptop.

            I can already boot a fully functional Arch installation on 8” on a SSD. It’s still not fast enough, I want this to go down to 3”. Google understands this and is working towards this end. Microsoft apparently also does, but is confined by the problems of PC BIOS.

            It is obvious that you have never used a modern system that boots up that fast – and, yes, such systems exist. Because if you had, you’d be trumpeting another tune now.

            Thanks for playing.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            You painfully ignore the fact that you still have to load data from stable storage mediums (HDDs, SSDs) onto system memory. The CPU itself has to compile the data into meaningful formats. The entire process takes some time. It just depends on much data needs to be move and processed.

            Modern OS aren’t exactly simple programs.

            8-10 seconds (I assume it is a cold boot) is very fast. You are just pushing your luck against the laws of diminishing returns if you want to go faster.

            Methinks, you are suffering from a severe degree of instant gratification.

    • ronch
    • 8 years ago

    I wonder how fast it is with a regular mechanical hard drive.

    • oldog
    • 8 years ago

    Yea, yea, yea it boots faster. But for the love of God can someone tell me why my Win7 computer won’t shut down anymore without a notification that Steam refuses to quit without being killed off by the OS.

    It never used to do that! With an SSD I swear it takes longer to shut the damn thing off than it does to boot it.

    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 8 years ago

    Can we get faster POSTs from motherboards too?

      • d0g_p00p
      • 8 years ago

      I would like to punch the face of the engineers who designed HP’s DL360 G7 server BIOS. It’s takes F O R E V E R to post. I swear it much be checking memory at bit per bit.

        • squeeb
        • 8 years ago

        We had some HP servers at my previous job. Boot time till video synced was about 2 minutes. And then the OS still had to load.

        Pieces of shit I tell you.

          • ronch
          • 8 years ago

          HP has a promo on those servers nowadays. Free coffee pot.

          • d0g_p00p
          • 8 years ago

          2 mins would be nice. These things take well over 10 mins when loaded up with 128GB of RAM. That’s just the memory check. Does not include the rest of the BIOS check or the RAID card, iLOM and PXE boot. I was having a issue trying to FAI a database server and it took over 1 hour (4 reboots) to get it up and running. Keep in mind all I was doing was changing the IP address on the iLOM port.

    • wiak
    • 8 years ago

    yes withSSD and a laptop with a optimized bios/efi tha has alot of things removed, on a desktop that has more harddrives, ssds, graphics cards, addon cards, this wont be that fast πŸ˜‰
    but it will boot faster than windows 7 that is πŸ˜‰

    • ShadowTiger
    • 8 years ago

    I have no hard evidence to back this up, but I feel like my computer has gotten slower over time even after a reformat and a fresh install of windows!

    When I initially installed Vista Basic on my self built computer 3 years ago, it booted very quickly, and importantly, once I typed in my password it took only 1-2 seconds to stop loading. That was super fast.

    2 years later I do a fresh install, it takes 5-10 seconds before it stops loading after typing my password in.

    Does anyone know if certain hardware gets slower over time? (I suspect that the HDD would matter the most)

      • thermistor
      • 8 years ago

      Badfailing HDD sectors. I believe Windows lowers the data rate when errors are encountered and increases the amount of error checking that is done. That eats into CPU cycles and could possibly increase boot time.

      • Bensam123
      • 8 years ago

      I’ve experienced this first hand and heard other people talk about it, unfortunately there isn’t a whole lot to support this. Generally speaking hardware doesn’t just wear out unless you’re talking about capacitors or hard drives like thermistor mentioned. I don’t believe that though. People insist it’s clutter crap, but it’s not.

      Maybe Scott will make a novel article on this…

      • FuturePastNow
      • 8 years ago

      CPU fan clogged with dust so the processor overheats and no longer runs at full speed?

        • Bensam123
        • 8 years ago

        No…

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 years ago

      Your HD controller may downshift through the DMA modes if it encounters errors, but it’s unlikely to make any difference — unless it gets all the way down to PIO mode, in which case the machine will be so slow it’s near-unusable. (There are several threads on this in the forum if you want to investigate this further).

      If you’re running Vista or Win7, it’s not going to be booting at its fastest right after a fresh install. You have to do a few boots before SuperFetch can optimize things. And installing patches (which you tend to do a lot of immediately after a fresh install of an OS that is now a year or more old) delays that process.

      Of course, a lot of people don’t notice or care because they use sleep/hibernation instead of rebooting anyway.

      (Note also that outboard peripherals and even network resources can affect boot times. Comparing your machine today with new/different USB devices or router to the way it used to be without those devices isn’t necessarily valid.)

        • Bensam123
        • 8 years ago

        Why would his HD controller randomly decide to start changing it’s DMA mode after using his computer for a few years?

          • UberGerbil
          • 8 years ago

          The controller doesn’t. The OS (specifically, the storage driver) does, based on seeing errors during transfers. Those errors can be the result of anything: failing cable, loose connector, media failures in the storage itself. In the old days of IDE and flat ribbon cables, the first two were pretty common, as just about any old-timer around here will tell you: the cables would often pull loose when you went into the case to do something else (or even work themselves loose over months/years thanks to thermal cycling), and it also wasn’t unusual for the cable to harden into one position over time (especially in hot, cramped cases) and then break internally when moved (because you were installing another device, or just cleaning out the dust bunnies). These days, with thin and flexible SATA cables and tight connectors, those issues are less common (though not completely eliminated). But media failures still happen, and thus failing sectors on a hard drive can still be misinterpreted by the OS and result in DMA downshifting; even more common is a scratched / flakey optical disc (though that would just affect the channel for the optical drive, not the HD).

          Downshifted DMA or PIO mode is easy to verify in Device Manager (and the event log), and easy to cure by just deleting the offending controller in Device Manager (as terrifying as that is the first time you do it, especially with the boot device) or updating a registry entry. All of which has been [url=http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=DMA+PIO+errors+windows&oq=DMA+PIO+errors+windows&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&gs_sm=e&gs_upl=8282l10867l0l12103l9l7l1l0l0l0l346l940l2.3.0.1l6l0<]amply documented[/url<] by a plethora of sites over the years.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            So, this is essentially what therm said, that his HD might be failing.

      • Coran Fixx
      • 8 years ago

      +1 to what UberGerbil said. Also, you are dealing with 2 years of patches so it is not exactly an apples to apples comparison (Please ignore that last bit if you mean ‘fresh install’ no patch updates)

    • pmeysemb
    • 8 years ago

    I just put together a system using an Asrock motherboard with a regular old sata drive. New to me, they have a cool utility called “fastboot” that seems to work well for just this sort of thing. I tested it a couple times and from power off to at the desktop is about five seconds. I think what they are doing is keeping the memory energized while the power is off to the motherboard. Is that even possible? Whatever. It’s pretty cool how they do it.

    • smilingcrow
    • 8 years ago

    I hope they focus more on sorting out the bugs:

    1. Explorer sometimes fails to auto update if you rename, delete or add a file so you have to refresh. Fixed on rebooting.
    2. Windows occasionally staying on top of others for no reason including Explorer. Fixed on rebooting.
    3. Homegroup – good idea but on the two networks that I’ve tried to use it on it has had major issues. On my home network my desktop is connected to a HTPC via HomePlug adapters and uses mobile broadband to connect to the internet. I’ve lost track of the number of times I’ve had to run the trouble-shooter to reconnect to the HTPC. If I close the Internet connection it always loses the HTPC for a while so I have to browse again to locate any folders that were open in Explorer windows.

    I like the features of Win7 but I’ve noticed that since the NT codebase was expanded/merged to make it a mainstream O/S that stability has suffered more and more.
    I went from Windows 3.11 to NT 3.51 so I missed the whole 95/98/ME thang otherwise maybe I would not notice this issue so much. Windows 2000 was the last version of Windows that was solid for me.

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 years ago

      Haven’t seen these issues on XP, Win7, or Vista. Not saying you’re not seeing them, just saying they aren’t a pervasive flaw in explorer.

    • sschaem
    • 8 years ago

    Kind of ‘funny’ when you think this as always been possible but never was a priority…

    • GreatGooglyMoogly
    • 8 years ago

    Neat if you’re a laptop user, but I rather want the opposite; being able to reboot the OS and restore my session completely. I only reboot once ever 3-6 months for updates, usually combined with a driver update because it’s such a major goddamn hassle to reboot.

      • bthylafh
      • 8 years ago

      If you want OSX Lion, you know where to find it.

        • smilingcrow
        • 8 years ago

        If you want to jump off a bridge, you know where to find one.

          • bthylafh
          • 8 years ago

          U MAD?

            • smilingcrow
            • 8 years ago

            Just find a low bridge with a big pond and enjoy the swim; it is Friday. πŸ™‚

    • indeego
    • 8 years ago

    2011. Please. Please. Please, for the love that is all Noodly, PLEASE stop having us reboot for patches, in particular IE patches. I know you are bound by kernel limitations, but it is 2011!

      • PeterD
      • 8 years ago

      Some programs give me the impression they returned to 1991.

      • xeridea
      • 8 years ago

      Linux

        • smilingcrow
        • 8 years ago

        How often do you need to reboot Linux?

        • Farting Bob
        • 8 years ago

        My ubuntu still needs to reboot after kernel updates, and a few other mission critical stuff.

          • smilingcrow
          • 8 years ago

          Roughly how many times a year is that?

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      This only matters for servers.

      A reboot here and there on a normal system doesn’t hurt.

        • mattthemuppet
        • 8 years ago

        it does if you have 10+ pdfs opened that you still need to read. It’s the one thing that delays me updating my laptop as I have to either find the time to read them (hours) or write the bloody titles down on a piece of paper (inconvenience). Let alone 1GB ImageJ files that take several minutes to open and compile stacks with.

        so yeah, I’m a big fan of the idea of rebootless updates.

    • jstern
    • 8 years ago

    The problem is when you install programs that run when you turn on your pc. To disable some, type msconfig on the Start bar, and disable.

    • odizzido
    • 8 years ago

    Looks fast, but what kind of desktop is that? I saw a black screen with some window on the left that didn’t look like it did anything?

      • Coran Fixx
      • 8 years ago

      Its the new i-android clone called windows 8. Microsoft figures no one will have keyboards in their flying cars so you will need to navigate by touchscreen.

    • ew
    • 8 years ago

    The problem with cold boots in my experience isn’t Windows it’s all the other stuff that insists on running on startup. In my case it’s Skype, Steam, HP printer cr@p, WIFI driver cr@p, anti-virus and probably some other stuff that keeps hidden. I get a Windows desktop very quickly but it’s useless until all the 3rd party stuff stops grinding away. It doesn’t sound like this new strategy will address this issue.

      • ew
      • 8 years ago

      Incidentally, this is why I’m a big fan of sleep/hibernate.

      • Game_boy
      • 8 years ago

      You can disable much of that from starting up on boot.

      Let Skype and Steam start when you need them.
      Uninstall the extraneous printer software – there must be a generic driver that just prints for your model. Same with wifi.
      Uninstall antivirus if it’s Norton/Mcafee. I’ve found Microsoft Security Essentials to not put any load on the system, or you can just run none and manually scan with something a few times a year.

        • UberGerbil
        • 8 years ago

        Agreed. For HP you may have to hunt around for their “reduced” driver, and if it’s a multi-function printer a bunch of the features like scanning won’t “just work” when you open the the lid: you’ll have to manually run something.

        If you’ve got Norton/Mcafee, definitely uninstall in favor of MSE or one of the other free solutions, but research how to uninstall before you do so. Norton has a free utility on their site that wipes out the lingering traces their uninstall routine fails to remove. (Norton is closer to malware itself than a solution to that problem).

      • anotherengineer
      • 8 years ago

      True.

      My gigabyte mobo actually takes 9 seconds from when I push the button to get to the mobo beep, then the bios spash screen is another 5 or 6 seconds, and then another 6 seconds or so for boot drive search before finally windows loading occurs.

      So basically 20 seconds from pushing the power button to when windows actually starts loading……….

        • floodo1
        • 8 years ago

        my friend just got a new Asus P8Z68-V Pro and it does all of the things you menetioned in under 2 seconds. I feel your pain, just last night it took nearly 30 seconds for my computer to start loading windows because I had a usb HD hooked up that had to spin up before the bios would move past detecting it.

        • bthylafh
        • 8 years ago

        It’s a great thing about my Cr-48: for all its other limitations, coming up from sleep to a live connection is something like 5 seconds, and a cold boot is maybe twice that.

        In your case, bet you it’s just Gigabyte’s crappy BIOS. Maybe when they finally get around to implementing UEFI it’ll get better.

          • xeridea
          • 8 years ago

          Yeah to bad you can’t do crap on your Chromebook. I would take a few seconds extra boot over uselessness any day. Google has tunnelvision. The web is NOT the world, just a big part of it. It doesn’t even matter anyway since I use sleep 95% of the time (unless leaving for more than 24 hours, or installing updates). With my Vertex II, my startup time is like 20 seconds, +20 to load all my TSRs (I use all of them, some for work such as WAMP). My bottlneck is my CPU (Athlon II dual @ 3 GHz), so faster CPU would probably cut boot time up to 40%. On my laptop, startup time kinda sux (slow CPU, no SSD), but I just use sleep or set it down a minute (I rarely use it anyway).

            • BlackStar
            • 8 years ago

            Oh, you are so deliciously mistaken about Chromebook.

          • anotherengineer
          • 8 years ago

          Probably Gigabytes old school bios although I do have a mech hdd (wd black). I didn’t realize that UEFI BIOS would make for a faster boot.

      • PeterD
      • 8 years ago

      Yes, my experience too.

      • indeego
      • 8 years ago

      [url=http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb963902<]AutoRuns![/url<]

        • ew
        • 8 years ago

        That’s an excellent utility. Thanks!

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 years ago

      Have a look in SERVICES.MSC — a lot of those things also install services, and in Windows 7 you can set services to start in a delayed fashion. Doing so should get you to the desktop even quicker, and may be more responsive as well. (Don’t mess with anything that looks like it’s part of Windows, but any 3rd party stuff is fair game — though some things like tray status apps may complain if a service isn’t available right away, YMMV)

        • ew
        • 8 years ago

        Thanks, I’ll check that out.

      • crose
      • 8 years ago

      Do you have SSD? multi-core CPU? Just wondering if those two thinks would fix your boot-up annoyances.

    • crabjokeman
    • 8 years ago

    I wouldn’t mind engaging in geeky, kinky interplay with her. She may look cute, but I bet she swings a mean SATA cable.

      • crabjokeman
      • 8 years ago

      Do you people have no sense of humor?

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        I think we’re tired of the clichΓ© of “Female = Geek drool”

          • crabjokeman
          • 8 years ago

          I’ll take that as a yes.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            Take it to mean that geek humor has evolved since the 80’s, as 80’s geeks have realized they have girlfriends/wives now.

            This lady is a professional, giving a professional demo. Respect her as a professional. You wouldn’t talk about a geeky, kinky interplay if it was a professional guy giving the demo.

        • smilingcrow
        • 8 years ago

        Tell us a joke and we’ll say if we like it.

        • DaveSylvia
        • 8 years ago

        It’s not that we don’t have a sense of humor. It just wasn’t that funny!

        P.S. Also, she’s [i<]okay[/i<] looking but not that cute and definitely not cute enough for that joke to work!

          • burntham77
          • 8 years ago

          She might be fun to talk to and even to date, but she’s mildly cute at best.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            She might be the smartest, funniest, coolest girl you’ll ever meet.

        • CasbahBoy
        • 8 years ago

        It isn’t just so predictable as to be unfunny, but it seems closely related to a general mindset that doesn’t encourage women to be open about computer-related interests to begin with.

        I love inappropriate humor here and there but this one is too common and genuinely lowering our chances of seeing women with similar interests.

          • Meadows
          • 8 years ago

          Just look for males and be done with it.

        • ronch
        • 8 years ago

        We have no sense of humor. And we’re armed.

      • crabjokeman
      • 8 years ago

      Everyone took this the wrong way. I might have commented on the content of the video if it pertained to Linux, or something else that interested me, but instead I made a joke about BDS&M involving SATA cables. If you don’ think that’s good for at least a chuckle, go back to 4chan.

      You might have bad taste in women if you expect everyone to be a brainless booth babe at a tech convention. The woman in the video is the exact opposite. You can tell she has brains, she’s hot, and she probably has to be tough to work in a generally male-dominated field. I don’t hold it against her that she works at M$, either.

        • UberGerbil
        • 8 years ago

        You’re just digging yourself deeper. Stop already.

          • crabjokeman
          • 8 years ago

          You’re correct, sir. It’s futile to explain myself to a bunch of shallow morons.

            • ludi
            • 8 years ago

            Dude, it wasn’t funny. It was crude frat-boy humor that only seems funny after five beers. Stop digging before you excavate a Balrog.

            • crabjokeman
            • 8 years ago

            It wasn’t intended to be anything more, but it’s interesting to see peoples’ vehement reactions.
            “The rabbit dug a hole straight through to China” – Scott Weiland

            • derFunkenstein
            • 8 years ago

            I found the irony in instructing other commenters to go back to 4chan to be pretty funny, in an unintentional kind of way.

        • Meadows
        • 8 years ago

        No, *you* go back to 4chan. There’s enough noise there that nobody will notice how much your humour sucks.

      • albundy
      • 8 years ago

      hahaha, you made my day!

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      You win one internets. πŸ˜€

      I don’t get it why people are asspaining over a silly joke.

        • crabjokeman
        • 8 years ago

        Thanks. From what I can tell, they’re afraid of being stereotyped as they have been in the past. I guess it’s like the A/V club of old.

          • Krogoth
          • 8 years ago

          I suspect unrealistic expectations are at work here.

          There’s a reason why waifus exist. πŸ˜‰

          FYI, [url<]http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/mai-waifu#.Tmrs4NRfZI4[/url<]

          • Meadows
          • 8 years ago

          You do realise he just feigned positive interest only to differ from everyone else, right?

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BOG4p1-H2Q[/url<]

            • derFunkenstein
            • 8 years ago

            He’s quite the contrarian.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            Nope.avi

            I sense that the butthurt stems from previous real-world relationships that went sour. πŸ˜‰

        • ludi
        • 8 years ago

        You sure do have a weird fascination with butts and temporary injury. Perhaps if you ask nicely, Meadows can flog you with a SATA cable.

          • Krogoth
          • 8 years ago

          Nah, he’s too “shy”.

          No wonder why he likes “Fluttershy” so much. πŸ˜‰

      • ronch
      • 8 years ago

      I think you need glasses.

      • Bensam123
      • 8 years ago

      Funny I was thinking the same thing simply because it’s rare for females to be used for showcasing technology, more so when they made sure to get her in the entire picture captured in all her ‘geekdem’. I was going to post something to the lines of them using her as a showpiece for their technology and showing how ‘in’ they are… but that would be sexist and the typical geekie reaction. After all, no giant corporations use people to their advantage.

      • rogthewookiee
      • 8 years ago

      Quite a list of anger here. My first reaction was, aren’t sata cables all male-male?

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        no, they’re all female-female. The pins are on the drive and the board. The plastic around the port is just to guide.

          • Bensam123
          • 8 years ago

          That’s just what they want you to think.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    Still waiting for SSD’s to become affordable. I don’t consider them affordable till I can buy 4 of 250gb in capacity or higher for less than 1,000 total. When that happens my world will change.

      • Anomymous Gerbil
      • 8 years ago

      If your world will change with slightly cheaper 250GB SSDs, surely it’s worth just a few extra dollars to buy existing SSDs?

      • anotherengineer
      • 8 years ago

      They aren’t too bad (prices) right now.

      I remember paying $265 for my old raptor 150GB. And a crucial M4 256GB can be had for about $395.

      That said it would more than likely be the most expensive thing in one’s PC………

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 8 years ago

        I was just looking over prices on newegg and to get a 250 Gb drive with a decent reviews is about 450 dollars per drive. I want to grab 4 and drop them into a 1 Tb Raid array that I can back up with a 1Tb HDD I have. I Can’t afford to spend 2,000 on a HDD. I just don’t have the money.

          • indeego
          • 8 years ago

          What 1 TB dataset do you have that is so important that it requires such incredible I/O access combined with the complete ghastly unreliability that is RAID0/JBOD?

          • Vasilyfav
          • 8 years ago

          If you have some critical data that requires speeds achieved from a raid array, then price shouldn’t matter to you at all. Otherwise, you would do just as well with putting less garbage on your primary 1 SSD and running everything else off an HDD.

          What you’re doing here is showing off and whining about prices, which, quite frankly, have been affordable for quite some time.

          • xeridea
          • 8 years ago

          If you RAID 4 SATA 3 drives you are likely to go slower than you would just having 1, depending on your RAID controller, many are limited @ 400 MB/s. If using software RAID (Linux), the overhead esp for random access may slow you down a bit unless you have a quad core.

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        What happened to prices..? I swear I saw Crucial m4 128GB being sold for some $160 somewhere just when the new firmware was coming out.. I was close to pulling the trigger on it.

        Now it’s $200. Is there a supply constraint going on, or what? Inflation?

      • indeego
      • 8 years ago

      Man I bet Yawn is getting tired of people changing their buy-points.

      • drfish
      • 8 years ago

      My mass storage goes on the a 2TB NAS w/ RAID 1. I would NEVER spend $1,000 for 1TB of storage of any kind.

      However, I was an SSD early adopter and never looked back. Right now ~$200 for a good 120GB SSD is the [i<]best money you can spend on your computer[/i<]. BTW, I just moved from a Vertex to a Veterx III - not a ton of noticeable difference except in benchmarks but I might add a 2nd since the 120GB is making me move around my Steam games a little too frequently... Make the jump, that water's fine! πŸ™‚

      • Pettytheft
      • 8 years ago

      Wow, first it was wait until it’s $1 per GB and now it’s this.

      You are really missing out. You still get a huge performance boost from a 128 or 64GB drive for your OS/select apps. Or you can use a Z68 chipset and get a significant boost with a small 20-64GB drive and pair it with a large slow drive. If you are building new there is no point not to have one unless you are on a very tight budget.

        • paulWTAMU
        • 8 years ago

        I’m just waiting till I build a new PC (2-3 years) to buy one but at these price points, I will go with at least a small SSD. I want to buy in now but I’m broke πŸ™

        • Buzzard44
        • 8 years ago

        @ Pettytheft and indeego, (4 x 250GB) <= $1000 is the same thing as 1GB <= $1.

        Other than extremely short lived special deals on relatively crummy SSDs, we still haven’t reached the $1/GB threshold, which is a legit line in the sand, considering that’s still 20x the cost of HDDs in many (if not most) instances.

    • dpaus
    • 8 years ago

    Although I’ve been happier and happier with ‘sleep’ mode, this is still a welcome development. Now if they can just have it stop killing all my open sessions in the middle of the night so it can run Windows Defender updates….

      • Farting Bob
      • 8 years ago

      You are aware you can choose if it auto updates or not with about 2 clicks of your mouse? My mum can do that, and she is a mother and therefor inferior at technology.

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