Release roundup: Efficient power, USB 3.0 thumb drives, and more

This week, in our look at product releases that didn’t make it into our regularly scheduled coverage, we have word of fresh goodies from Corsair, MSI, and Thermaltake.

  • Corsair announces availability of $99 gaming PC case. Remember the Corsair Carbide Series 400R we told you all about this spring? Well, Corsair says the $99 enclosure is now available at last. Indeed, Newegg already has the thing in stock. Despite its low price, this case ships with three fans, has room for as many as 10 fans in total, and features built-in USB 3.0 ports, a flipped internal layout with tool-less hard drive bays, and a motherboard tray with cut-outs for cable routing and access to the back of the CPU socket. Not a bad value proposition for $99.

  • Corsair announces new high-speed USB 3.0 flash drives. As blue USB 3.0 ports continue to crop up in more and more places, Corsair has announced the release of USB 3.0 variants of its Flash Voyager, Flash Voyager GT, and Flash Survivor thumb drives. These SuperSpeed models start at just $17 for the 8GB Voyager and range up to $129 for the 64GB Voyager GT. Not content with enabling higher performance, Corsair has redesigned the vanilla Voyager line with a smaller body that’s shorter and narrower than the USB 2.0 variety.

  • MSI fortifies arsenal of G Series gaming laptops with GeForce GTX 570M. The title of this press announcement pretty much says it all—MSI’s 17.3" GT780DXR and 15.6" GT683DXR gaming laptops are now available with Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 570M graphics processor, which launched just over two months ago. The GPU has 336 stream processors, a 256-bit memory interface, and theoretical peak fill rate and memory bandwidth figures not far from those of the desktop GeForce GTX 460 1GB.

  • Thermaltake rolls out high-wattage, high-efficiency PSUs. You probably won’t be sticking Thermaltake’s new Toughpower XT power supplies in your next budget build, but enthusiasts with power-hungry machines may feel differently. These new units have 1275W, 1375W, and 1475W power output ratings, and they’ve received impressive 80 Plus certifications—Platinum for the 1275W model and Gold for the other two. All three PSUs are modular, have dual 12V rails, and feature seven years of warranty coverage.

It’s nice to see USB 3.0 slowly creeping into the mainstream. At those prices, I might be tempted to pick up a USB 3.0 thumb drive myself.

Comments closed
    • Sargent Duck
    • 8 years ago

    I wonder if anybody told these power supply ratings that there are other numbers out there than “80”. I mean, how hard is it to say 85%? Rather than 80% gold.

    • link626
    • 8 years ago

    that flash voyager looks inspired by a dildo.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 8 years ago

      Corsair should make a limited edition one co-branded with Noctua using Noctua’s color scheme :p

    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    Corsair Case links to: [url<]https://mail.google.com/mail/u/1/#label/Launch+PR/13248d1dc4fc7648[/url<] This case looks tempting though. I mentioned being torn between Lian-Lis new cases and Corsairs after having a Lian-Li for close to 10 years (the same case). This may just tip the scales.

    • mesyn191
    • 8 years ago

    Adata has been making cheap-ish USB3 sticks made of aluminum for quite a while. I have 2x 32GB ones I got earlier this year for maybe $50-60 at newegg. Better bargain than the Corsair one shown above IMO.

      • Farting Bob
      • 8 years ago

      What sort of speed do they get though? Ive only used 2 or 3 USB 3 thumb drives, and they have varied in speed noticably. The cheaper, first gen one was barely faster than USB 2 in real world, but i purchased a voyager 8GB one last month and it can sustain speeds not that far off my 5400rpm HDD, and its far from the fastest spec USB thumb drive.

    • internetsandman
    • 8 years ago

    80 plus platinum eh? Well I guess it had to start somewhere, even if it is in a series of almost pointless PSU’s

    • flip-mode
    • 8 years ago

    Corsair started well with the Obsidian, but each case after gets uglier and uglier. It’s unfortunate.

    Thank goodness for Fractal Design.

      • anotherengineer
      • 8 years ago

      Indeed. The one downer for me is the door hinge being on the left side. It does not make sense since the majority of people are right handed and put the case on the right side of the desk and then the door is awkward.

      Why do they all do this? Antec, fractal EPIC FAIL make the door open the other way or mke it so it can be opened either way.

      I tossed my sonata for that reason alone and got a lian li PC-7fnw, however I find it looks nice but it flimsy and has a thin pop can feel.

      Hurry up fractal and fix your door.

        • UberGerbil
        • 8 years ago

        Yes, [i<]exactly[/i<]. Putting the tower on the right is the natural location, and the arrangement of my current office means it's the only possible location. I dislike doors anyway, but I'm sure not going to get one that makes everything more difficult. I did once see a case online with a door opening the other way, and at the time I kind of noted it on my way to something else thinking I'd come back and check it out but I was never able to find it again. I'm starting to wonder if it was just a reversed photo. It astonishes me that no one seems to offer the alternative (or, as you say, a clever way to switch the hinge sides).

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 8 years ago

          Way back in the day, the ThermalTake aluminum versions of the Chenming Dragon cases could be hinged on either side.

    • Zyphos
    • 8 years ago

    Your Corsair case PR link goes to gmail with a search for “label:launch-pr”

    • MadManOriginal
    • 8 years ago

    A 1475W PSU, seriously?

      • smilingcrow
      • 8 years ago

      I know, why not 1500W!

      • AlvinTheNerd
      • 8 years ago

      There are GPU clusters running 8 or more GPU’s on one motherboard that need this much power and more. Many people ‘green link’ multiple PSU’s, that is running a short across the green wire of multiple PSU’s so the second or third PSU can run just the GPU’s. The fewer PSU’s they have to green link, the more reliable the system.

        • albundy
        • 8 years ago

        way past that consumer fine line with that one…

          • willmore
          • 8 years ago

          Yeah, no kidding, you can buy industrial PSUs that will work better. Heck, you can just order custom ones if you really need greater than a hair dryer worth of power.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 8 years ago

        Bah, you’re no fun. Yes I am aware there are systems that ‘can’ use this power, real GPU clusters wouldn’t likely use ‘enthusiast’ power supplies though. But these days even 2-way SLI isn’t as common as it used to be, and it was never very common, so a PSU that is probably 2x the max of what almost any enthusiast would use seems silly.

        • Farting Bob
        • 8 years ago

        If you are running that many GPU’s on one system, its highly recommended you use multiple PSU’s or industrial PSU’s, thermaltake makes flashy overpriced products and will always always go for the highest number they can stick on their box. Nobody in the real world has a need for this, but sadly many people will buy it thinking that their air cooled overclocked 2500k and single 570 will need this size PSU. Meanwhile its damn near impossible to find a current model, high efficiency PSU rated for less than 500w, even if i know i will only ever need 200w.

        • UberGerbil
        • 8 years ago

        [quote<]Many people 'green link' multiple PSU's[/quote<]"Many" people? I bet the literally all know one another.

      • willmore
      • 8 years ago

      Does the IEC cable used by most power supplies even support 1.5KW? Well, what do you know, wikipedia saves the day: [url<]https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/IEC_60320[/url<] the C13 connector is your friend. Looks like 15A is the only limit. So, for anyone using over 100V RMS, you're past the freakin gedge. (98.3_V, to be precise) I agree, that's a bit crazy, unless you're bitmining. And then, you're just a different kind of crazy.

        • UberGerbil
        • 8 years ago

        Yeah, there’s a reason why you don’t see consumer high-wattage devices like space heaters that go higher than 1500W (in the US). Plenty of homes with 15A wiring (and breakers), and 15A x 110 volts = 1650 watts, so at 1500 there’s still a safety margin before you start heating up your walls from the [i<]inside[/i<]....

          • willmore
          • 8 years ago

          You’re forgetting our friends in Japan who use 100V AC and the same plug, so 1.5kW really is the limit for them.

          Then again, there are other plugs. There’s the one with the T shaped blade that’s good for 20A. Of course there are tons of others. If we keep this up, we’re going to end up like that silly rant about ‘which countries power plug is the best’.

            • just brew it!
            • 8 years ago

            Ahh, OK. I didn’t realize you were referring to Japanese line voltage in your previous post.

            My explanation is still applicable for US line voltage…

            • Farting Bob
            • 8 years ago

            I like living int he UK with 240V standard, my PSU is a few percent more efficient than yours and my toaster uses 1700W on max setting, with no worry about melting my walls.

            • willmore
            • 8 years ago

            You’re not helping. 😛

        • just brew it!
        • 8 years ago

        That’s not how voltage and current work — you don’t “use 100V RMS”.

        If the PSU just barely meets the 80 Plus Gold requirements it looks to me like it will be just barely over the limit when the PSU is at 100% load.

        For 80 Plus Gold the PSU must be at least 87% efficient with a power factor of at least 0.90. So when pumping out 1475W, it will draw at most 1695W of *real* power at the wall; allowing for the 0.90 power factor, the *apparent* power (which is what we must use to calculate the amount of current flowing through the cord) could be as much as 1884W. At 120V nominal line voltage, 1884W would require 15.7A of current.

        But if the PSU’s real specs exceed the 80 Plus Gold requirements by even a tiny bit, we’re good. For example, if it is 88% efficient with a power factor of 0.93, that gets us down to the magical 15A number. Or if the user draws “only” 1400W (instead of the full 1475W), that gets us down below 15A as well.

        It really does look like the wattage of the top model was chosen based on the current carrying capacity of the power cord! I imagine we’ll eventually see some “extreme” PSUs that switch to a C19 style connector (20A), or a pair of C13s…

          • willmore
          • 8 years ago

          I’m pretty sure the Japanese use 100V RMS AC power.

          And, yes, I’m quite familiar with power factor and other things AC. I got to spend to very fun semesters in college studying it. Would you like me to convert your Y load to a delta?

          I’m assuming that the power value quoted for a PSU is the power of the outputs. Now, that value plus energy lost to inefficiency gives us the real power of the load. Divide that by the power factor and you have the apparant power at the input of the PSU–which is what you’ll need to size the cable for. Are we in agreement on that?

            • just brew it!
            • 8 years ago

            Yes, we are. See my followup post (#20).

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This