AMD shows 28-nm mobile GPU in action

As the Intel Developer Forum rolls on, AMD seems to be doing all it can to get into the spotlight. After claiming a Guinness world record with an overclocked FX processor yesterday, the company has now given everyone a glimpse of its upcoming 28-nm graphics processors. Here’s the skinny, straight from the company’s Facebook Wall:

Live from IDF, here’s a sneak peek of our upcoming 28nm next gen notebook discrete, GPU, driving Codemasters’ cutting edge simulator, DiRT 3 – Official Game Page. This is working 28nm technology in-house. Are you ready for this?

That man in the photo is none other than David Cummings, the Director of Technology Management for AMD’s GPU division. You’ll find a couple of closeups of the test board (sans Cumming’s mug) in the image gallery below.

Last we heard, AMD expected to have its first 28-nm graphics chips out by the end of this year. AMD is working with both TSMC and GlobalFoundries on 28-nm manufacturing. Our own Scott Wasson and Geoff Gasior are at IDF as we speak, and they should have more details for you all tomorrow.

Comments closed
    • TAViX
    • 8 years ago

    Will the top mobile7xxx GPUs fits in laptop cheaper than 2k$ ??? If not, to bad…

    • Silus
    • 8 years ago

    Funny how no one even talks about why they are only showing mobile offerings 🙂

      • Xenolith
      • 8 years ago

      Well let’s guess. Mobile is where the money is? A die shrink is most useful for low power/low heat usage?

    • jamsbong
    • 8 years ago

    Remember ATI always manufacture a low-mid end chip when there is a manufacturing die shrink? 4770 was the test subject for 40nm (as an example). I think ATI is testing the 28nm with mobile GPU. Mobile chips are simpler and runs at lower frequencies. Not as demanding as a high-end chip.

    • link626
    • 8 years ago

    there’s room for a bigger gpu fan.
    they should’ve made a bigger fan.

    • indeego
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]Are you ready for this? [/quote<] Why ask this rhetorical question of an unavailable product?

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    As upset as I am about their fumbling of BD, their GPU department is only lacking in the workstation department.

      • chuckula
      • 8 years ago

      AMD has become a first-rate graphics company with an underperforming CPU division. It might have been better if ATI had bought AMD instead of the other way around (although it would have been impractical in 2006).

        • shank15217
        • 8 years ago

        What bullcrap, desktop benchmarks don’t make or break AMDs innovation in the CPU industry which is a whole lot longer than your e-peen.

          • travbrad
          • 8 years ago

          Benchmarks may not break them, but a lack of sales does.

      • indeego
      • 8 years ago

      And Linux driver department.

      edit: How could I forget Windows driver departments!

        • chuckula
        • 8 years ago

        I’m 100% Linux at home and the issues with AMD’s drivers are what keep me on Nvidia. The open-source drivers are always way behind in cards made in the last 2 years, and the proprietary catalyst drivers do have good OpenGL performance but tend to have all kinds of nasty bugs in daily use.

          • Game_boy
          • 8 years ago

          Nvidia don’t even support open drivers. On principle Linux users should be buying AMD.

            • chuckula
            • 8 years ago

            Lemme guess.. you don’t actually use Linux you just like AMD over Nvidia no matter the consequences right? There are open source drivers for Nvidia although Nvidia does nothing to officially support them. What’s ironic is that the open source Nvidia drivers aren’t really any worse than the open source AMD drivers, even though AMD “supports” the open source developers (by dumping partial sets of documentation 6 months after launching a new chipset).

            I go with what works. If AMD wants to actually support open source drivers with full-fledged company support and if the result show, then I’ll be happy to switch over. If AMD wants to get Catalyst up to date and fix the bugs that plague other Linux users, I’m more than happy to use the Catalyst drivers. Frankly, the best open source support for graphics under Linux comes from Intel… Ivy Bridge graphics are already supported right now even though the chips won’t be out for 6 months, not to mention that Intel employs about half of the X.org developers.

            • swaaye
            • 8 years ago

            No I think he said that Linux users should support companies willing to provide hardware documentation. That doesn’t really have any relation to whether the driver developers that use the documentation don’t do a good job.

            People bitched endlessly at ATI when they were fully secretive and today people still bitch when they are providing docs for hardware all the way back to R100. Linux is full of love, I see.

            • Chrispy_
            • 8 years ago

            Where there are nerds, there is nerdrage.

            • Game_boy
            • 8 years ago

            Running Ubuntu 11.04 on an HD5670 fine. I concede I don’t run many modern games but the ones I do have work fine.

            And don’t hold Intel up as a good example. Poulsbo was a mess, no functional Linux driver released for millions of netbook users.

          • bcronce
          • 8 years ago

          I don’t use Linux, but based on my readings, as of late, the Opensource ATI drivers are about 1/2 as performant as the closed source ones, but much more stabled and fewer bugs. Also, the Opensource drivers now have better support for newer cards than older ones, since very few people have the older ones now. 68/6900 series are best supported.

          Again, from what I’ve read.

    • swaaye
    • 8 years ago

    28nm ought to be pretty exciting since we’ve had about 3 generations of 40nm.

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 8 years ago

      mo shrinkage, mo problems

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        Certainly the first gen of 28mm should be one to dip toes in cautiously.

      • Ushio01
      • 8 years ago

      April 2009 when a 40nm GPU first debuted and 2 years 5 months later still no firm release date for 28nm.

        • Farting Bob
        • 8 years ago

        If you ignore Intel’s march towards 1nm then thats not exactly bad for a full node reduction in size. I dont see anybody else going sub 40nm for anything but basic NAND chips. 28nm is better than anything currently on the market for something as complex as a GPU and only Intel can shrug that off.

          • Game_boy
          • 8 years ago

          40nm is a renamed TSMC 45nm
          28nm is a renamed TSMC 32nm

          If you look up the process characteristics like drive currents, they are inferior to Intel 45nm and 32nm respectively. It’s because the orginal processes were “cancelled” (actually delayed) and in order to avoid looking bad they renamed them to a smaller node because there’s no actual rule on node naming; the number has little to do with actual feature sizes.

          So this is TSMC getting 32nm, being the latest to do so out of Intel, GF and them.

    • sweatshopking
    • 8 years ago

    sounds exciting. i’m a big fan of video games. well have to wait and see how long it takes nvidia to demo 28nm… probably be a while…

      • maxxcool
      • 8 years ago

      I just want more power savings 😉

        • RAMBO
        • 8 years ago

        I would like to see increasing power usage as an option to better performance.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 8 years ago

          If only there were some mind bogglingly futuristic technology that allowed manual adjustment of clock speeds through driver control panels…

      • dashbarron
      • 8 years ago

      Lol, SSK. How come you’ve never mentioned you liked video games in all of those late night Steam secessions?

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        you know i love games baby. why you think my ass is so big?

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This