Release roundup: SSDs, IPS displays, and efficient power

This week in our look at recent product release announcements, we bring tidings from the folks at Adata, Enermax, HP, Kingston, OCZ, and Raidmax:

  • Adata doubles down on SATA III. We’re used to seeing SSD makers announce whole batches of SSDs all at once, but Adata’s latest launch involves just one drive: the 120GB S510, which the company describes as a "mid-range version of the . . . flagship S511." Mid-range as it might be, this drive has a 6Gbps Serial ATA interface, a SandForce SF-2200 controller, and top transfer speeds of 550MB/s for reads and 510MB/s for writes. The 120GB S511 currently sells for $204.99 at Newegg, so I’d expect the S510 to cost a little less.

  • Enermax announces Platimax power supplies. Enermax’s new Platimax PSUs all possess 80 Plus Platinum certifications, which is probably where they got their name. The certification means they should be able to achieve efficiencies in the 89-92% range depending on load. (Enermax actually quotes top efficiency of 94%, which is beyond even that standard.) Platimax PSUs are rolling out in 600W, 750W, 850W, 1000W, and 1200W flavors, with prices ranging from $179 to $329.99. They have modular cabling and 140-mm Twister Bearing fans.

  • HP expands award-winning display portfolio. Is it me, or is IPS panel technology becoming increasingly popular? Earlier this week, HP announced four new ZR-series displays all featuring IPS panels and LED backlights. The displays have panel sizes of 20", 21.5", 24", and 27", with resolutions ranging from 1600×900 to 2560×1600. sRGB color gamuts are standard across the board, and HP quotes contrast ratios of 2,000,000:1 for the ZR2240w and ZR2440w. Prices start at just $189 for the ZR2040w if you order from HP’s online store.

  • Kingston Digital launches first SandForce-based business-equipped SSD. Kingston’s new SSDNow KC100 business-friendly SSDs have 6Gbps Serial ATA interfaces and use SandForce’s DuraClass functionality to "deliver world-class data integrity protection." S.M.A.R.T. monitoring capabilities are on the menu, too, as are transfer speeds of up to 555MB/s during reads and 510MB/s during writes. These aren’t cheap, though. The 120GB model will set you back $337, and the top-of-the-line 480GB offering costs $1270. (Kingston also sells KC100 SSDs as part of upgrade kits, which cost a little more than the bare drives.)

  • OCZ SSDs provide true "instant-on" access for LG premium ultra-thin P220 notebooks. OCZ has concocted an Indilinx-based solid-state drive with a 2.5" form factor that’s two millimeters thinner than typical 2.5" drives—just 7.5 mm. That reduced thickness allows it to slip into the LG P220 ultra-thin notebook, which is only 0.82" thick. LG P220 laptops with OCZ solid-state drives inside started shipping in Korea in August, OCZ says, but they’ll be available "into select global markets shortly." Here’s hoping we’ll see them here in North America.
  • Raidmax announces new Viper case. This latest enclosures should please enthusiasts and gamers who like their PCs to have a splash of color—and not to break the bank. Priced at only $59.99, the Raidmax Viper features tool-less drive bays, cable routing behind the motherboard tray, a bottom-mounted power-supply emplacement, a trio of fans, and USB 3.0 front ports. Look for this bad boy in U.S. and Canadian stores next month.

Those HP displays look rather nice. I’m still using the ZR24w as my primary display, but it has an old-school CCFL backlight. Maybe it’s time to upgrade. Hmm…

Comments closed
    • GraveDigger
    • 8 years ago

    Normally I would only be mildly irritated having bought three HP zr24w’s last spring because of the lower power requirements on the new ones, but the fact that they’re offering 1:1 scaling for 1080p letterboxing on the zr2440w is supremely annoying. The zr24w’s “1:1 scaling” stretches 1080p up to 1920×1200 and my PS3 only outputs 1080p, resulting in stretched AR.

    It’s not really bad in games but it has me considering $100 blu-ray software for my PC to stop the distortion.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    Good grief. Going from the 20″ to the 21.5″ on HP’s site is $100 difference. I was holding out hope that since the 20″ was $189, a 21.5″ might only run around $220 and be finally in a price range I’m willing to spend.

    • DarkUltra
    • 8 years ago

    “- I’m still using the ZR24w as my primary display, but it has an old-school CCFL backlight.”

    You should look for a display with RGB LEDs. High end monitors use CCFL backlight because it has better white.

    • Chrispy_
    • 8 years ago

    Cheap IPS displays is a good thing for desktops. It can only mean that more IPS laptops are round the corner.

    WHY ARE LAPTOP SCREENS SO DIRE?

    “Good” laptop screens are barely up to “mediocre” desktop standards, and that statement is even true considering the significant decline in quality of cheap TN desktop (gloss-tastic) screens over the last few years.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 8 years ago

      Crappy IPS laptop screens: IMMINENT

    • moose17145
    • 8 years ago

    Yay monitors and SSD’s etc…. personally I rather like the 80+ platinum rated power supplies. Its nice to see a platinum rated PSU that’s under a kilowatt. Personally i would be very interested in either the 600 or 750 watt models. My computer under full load eats just enough power that it would fall right within the “Sweet spot” of a 600 watt PSU.

    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    Seems like sandforce is turning into the defacto bottleneck for most SSDs. So much for brands being differentiated outside of Intel, which even uses sandforce on some of their drives. :l

    • Tumbleweed
    • 8 years ago

    Is anyone able to post a comment here using Chrome, because I’m not. FF works fine, though. When I try with Chrome, it just keeps the ‘loading…’ notice going forever. 🙁

      • Kamisaki
      • 8 years ago

      I use Chrome all the time, I’ve never had a problem posting. Not sure what the issue could be.

      • Bensam123
      • 8 years ago

      Sometimes I have problems with the comments on hear crashing chrome for some reason, that hasn’t happened in awhile though.

      • MethylONE
      • 8 years ago

      Chrome 14 here… no problems, try uninstalling it and re-installing, I had to do that once due to some funky problems and it fixed everything.

    • Tumbleweed
    • 8 years ago

    The new 27″ is not 2560×1600 as the article states, but 2560×1440. All the monitors except the 24″ are 16:9, with the 24″ being 16:10.

    Note: these all have the wonderful _matte_ coating, so you can actually use them in a room or office with, you know, light coming in. I use the older 24″ model, the zr24w at home _and_ work, and love it.

    In checking the differences between it at this new one show: an extra USB port, higher contrast ratio, slightly darker (350cd/m^2 vs 400 on my older model), about 2 pounds lighter than the older, and much lower typical power usage – 48W vs 85W for mine. That’s a pretty good deal. I’ll probably get one of these and move my current one to secondary monitor status, since I was planning on getting another one, anyway. I think the new one is about 1ms quicker, too.

    Also note – the 27″ has a wide color gamut. That’s the reason I haven’t moved to a 27″ or 30″ monitor yet – I don’t know of any standard color gamut IPS monitors with matte coating. The smaller monitors have a standard color gamut.

      • APWNH
      • 8 years ago

      Hold on. I thought wide gamut is better than standard? The implication here is the opposite??

        • Tumbleweed
        • 8 years ago

        Wide gamut is only really useful for people doing professional photo editing, movies, etc. If you’re making graphics for the web, etc., then you’ll see colors on your monitor that won’t exist for anyone, which will be a problem. I learned this the hard way. I originally had at work the 30″ HP, with matte coating (yay!) and wide color gamut (initial yay, changed to boo).

        The vast majority of people do not need a wide color gamut. If all monitors could show, and content were calibrated to a wide color gamut, then we’d be okay, but that’s not where we’re at, and won’t be for a very long time.

        If you’re just a content consumer, you’re going to see over-saturated colors, too.

        it’s like having a $200k supercar – sure, it sounds great, but in practice, most people couldn’t drive one without crashing every other block.

          • Zoomer
          • 8 years ago

          Just implement a eco/grandma mode in that supercar and it’s all good. sRGB emulation, backwards compatibility!

          • moriz
          • 8 years ago

          going by the 27″ monitor’s tech specs, it only gains wide gamut support if connected through the displayport. maybe it will default back to 16.7 million colors with DL DVI.

            • MathMan
            • 8 years ago

            Wide gamut != 10 bit component input

            The gory technical specs pages of the 27″ monitor on the HP website are very much lacking in detail, but I didn’t see where it says wide gamut is only supported over displayport.

            However, your comment about the number of colors in DVI makes me believe (correct me if I’m wrong), that you link wide gamut to the number of bits per component.

            They are really orthogonal concepts: it’s perfectly fine to have 16-bits RGB (R5G5B5) input (if such a thing existed as input), yet still have wide gamut.

            Wide gamut means that your color triangle covers a much larger area of the light space that your eyes are able to see. Check it out the differences here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide-gamut_RGB_color_space) and here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide-gamut_RGB_color_space).

            In the case of LCD panels, the ability to do wide gamut is determined by spectrum of the backlight in the panel. Some LEDs output a wider spectrum, which allows a larger range of visible colors.

            If you select sRGB mode in a wide gamut monitor, the color transformation matrix inside the scaler chip inside the monitor will compress the incoming RGB pixels such that they fall within a smaller range of colors.

            As Tumbleweed noted: most graphic assets on the web are designed with sRGB in mind. If you display them on a wide gamut display on a browser that’s disregards color calibration, you’ll get vastly oversaturated colors.

            • moriz
            • 8 years ago

            i know what you mean. the 10-bit input merely gives enough “slots” so that you get a uniform distribution of colors across the entire gamut. it is entirely possible to have a 6-bit wide gamut display that can only display three neon bright red/green/blue and shades of gray, for example.

            all i’m wondering is, if you connect through DL DVI and use sRGB mode, will you just end up with the equivalent of 8-bit input on a standard color gamut? i’ve never had a wide gamut display before, so i obviously can’t test it.

            EDIT: the info regarding displayport and wide gamut is in the quick specs page
            [url<]http://h18004.www1.hp.com/products/quickspecs/14144_na/14144_na.html[/url<]

            • crazybus
            • 8 years ago

            There’s nothing on that spec page that indicates a wide gamut, only that it is 72% (of NTSC, presumably), or roughly sRGB most likely.

            • moriz
            • 8 years ago

            i think the part where it stated that it supports 1.07 billion colors is a good indication. as mentioned already, it is entirely possible that the display still uses a standard color gamut, but 1.07 billion colors in a standard color gamut seems to be a bit excessive.

          • APWNH
          • 8 years ago

          But the issue isn’t that things [b<]look bad[/b<] on a high-gamut display, is it? It's that if you put two colors too closely together while designing on a high-gamut display, then when the image is displayed on a regular crappy display they will appear to be indistinguishable. So when you're working on your web layout, simply set your monitor to low contrast mode (or some less vaguely worded equivalent of this concept) or just use a crappy display for that purpose. Surely it isn't the high-gamut display's fault that it's better at being a display. This is what I don't get though -- colors being "oversaturated" on a display which is better at displaying colors. I generally take "oversaturated" to mean that an image has a lot of its high color ranges mapped to maximum (or nearly that). For instance, a red to black spectrum where the entire top 1/4 of the red part is 255 on the red channel. That's oversaturated. Simply displaying content on a high gamut display will not cause it to be oversaturated in this way unless you have Digital Vibrance cranked up real high in the video card settings, because I can reasonably say that 255 red is more red than 200 red. In fact the high-gamut display's 255 red is going to be more red than its 200 red compared to a crappy display's 255 red compared to its own 200 red. I could also reasonably expect the high-gamut display's 255 red to be more red than the crappy display's 255 red. Still doesn't make it oversaturated. It just makes it more contrasty. A higher color gamut. The problem with using our 3 channel abstraction of color is that it's not physically accurate at all, but it's really difficult to create a full spectrum display. In the meantime while we wait for this far off technology, I suppose there does exist a way that a screen with an inferior color contrast can actually be superior due to its ability to better replicate colors under some specific lighting condition.

            • crazybus
            • 8 years ago

            If there is no colour management involved so the sRGB colours are not mapped to the larger gamut, yes, things can look bad. Consider something sensitive to saturation such as skin tone. What looks natural on an sRGB display may look goofy on a screen with a much larger gamut, if the correct profile conversion is not applied.

            • Tumbleweed
            • 8 years ago

            If you create an image for the web, and make it ‘look right’ on your ‘wide gamut’ display, it’s not going to look right on what the vast majority of people are using. I created a very subtly-colored design on my previous wide-gamut 30″ HP IPS monitor, and it looked basically WHITE when I viewed it at home on a regular monitor.

            The inverse – take an image created on a standard gamut display and show it on a wide-gamut display, and you may or may not get colors that are not what were intended.

            Either way, it’s just a bad idea to create something intended for standard gamut displays on a wide gamut display. The vast majority of displays in use are standard gamut (or worse, in the case of most laptops).

            And that’s not even talking about the hassle of keeping something calibrated. Ugh.

      • moriz
      • 8 years ago

      hold on to your zr24w, since the new 24″ monitor is 6-bit + AFRC.

      • mesyn191
      • 8 years ago

      Which article said the 27″ HP monitor has 48w power usage in typical use? That is great if true.

        • Tumbleweed
        • 8 years ago

        I was referring to the new 24″ display, not the 27″. Sorry to disappoint.

    • crazybus
    • 8 years ago

    Yay! for more options in the 27″ 2560×1440 market.

      • FuturePastNow
      • 8 years ago

      And less expensive, at that! Looks very nice.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    SSD really need to not only get their apparent quality control issues under control but they could really use a price drop. paying more than a dollar per gigabyte… makes me feel sick just to think about it.

      • APWNH
      • 8 years ago

      Stock up on those 3TB drives. 🙂

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 8 years ago

    $730 for the 27″ !! 2560 x 1440 ! IPS ! LED Backlit ! Holy S***

      • Ushio01
      • 8 years ago

      and even if it’s a 6-bit + A-FRC panel to allow the lower price unless you need colour gamut higher than 70% of either NTSC or Adobe RGB you won’t notice the difference between it and an 8-bit panel.

        • moriz
        • 8 years ago

        it’s wide gamut, so true 10-bit panel here.

        only thing we don’t know is its true refresh rate and input lag. if the input lag is relatively low, then HP has a real winner on their hands at that price.

      • odizzido
      • 8 years ago

      I am waiting for the 120hz LED IPS panels. Until then I will live with my TN one.

        • crabjokeman
        • 8 years ago

        My sympathies..

        • Parallax
        • 8 years ago

        Hopefully won’t have to wait too much longer. I’ve been holding-off on trying a 120Hz TN because I know I’d never be able to go back.

          • odizzido
          • 8 years ago

          yeah I played around with a 120hz TN panel and it’s really good…..I don’t want to have to choose between getting a good frame rate and getting good colour/viewing angles though. I want both.

            • Firestarter
            • 8 years ago

            Aren’t IPS panels too slow to do a genuine 120hz? I mean, at 8.3ms between frames, an IPS panel will probably smoosh the frames together.

            On second thought, as long as the input lag is negligible, this may just provide a whole ‘nother level of creamy smoothness :drool:

            • odizzido
            • 8 years ago

            Yeah I am pretty sure they are too slow for 120hz which is why I am waiting. Could be a few years.

            • DarkUltra
            • 8 years ago

            Actually they are more than fast enough. You only need a partial twist to get smoother looking movements and precise cursor. If the can fully switch in 8ms, that is just as fast as a screen refresh 1000ms/120=8,33

            [url<]http://jooh.no/web/60hz_vs_120hz_smooth_mouse_cursor_ips.jpg[/url<] But the movements will be blurry and 3d vision would be exceeding the boundaries of common sense. I wonder if there are physical limitations to ips/superlcd crystal switching or they can make them as fast as these "3d ready" 3ms tn panels if they believed there was a market for that.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This