Eee Pad Transformer 2 benched, may indeed have Kal-El

All that talk about a second-generation, Kal-El-powered Eee Pad Transformer may not have been just idle speculation. Benchmarks for an "Asus Transformer TF201" made their way onto the GLBenchmark website. While the results have been taken down, Liliputing was able to retrieve them from Google’s cache—and they paint an interesting picture.

Compared to Acer’s Iconia Tab A500, which packs a vanilla Tegra 2 system-on-a-chip, the Transformer TF201 apparently managed considerably higher scores: 40.6 FPS vs. 17 FPS in the "Egypt Standard" test, and 65 vs. 21 FPS in the "Offscreen 720p test." Liliputing points out that the TF201 figures are roughly in line with "what you’d see from a high-end smartphone such as the Samsung Galaxy S II."

Based on what Nvidia disclosed yesterday about Kal-El’s power consumption, it seems like those gains in performance might not imply shorter battery life. Kal-El purportedly draws less power than its predecessor in standby mode as well as during MP3 playback, HD video playback, and gaming. (The power consumption figures quoted by Nvidia might be best-case scenarios, though.)

As we noted yesterday, rumors around the web suggest the second-gen Eee Pad Transformer could arrive next month. Little else is known about the device so far.

Comments closed
    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    Curious to see how Apples A6 competes given that it’s A5 thumps Tegra 2, especially where ironically enough in graphics.

      • willmore
      • 8 years ago

      [Citation Needed]

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        Go to Anandtech.

          • willmore
          • 8 years ago

          I try not to. I prefer to stick to sites that aren’t so biased.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            I disagree. But even if the site was biased, you should be smart enough to be able to see through it, and focus on the results.

            Or, do you just close your eyes and ignore the numbers if they make you uncomfortable?

            • willmore
            • 8 years ago

            I get tired of filtering out their bias and their reporting doesn’t justify the effort. Since they stand alone in saying that the iPad2 is so much better than any Tegra 2 based tablet, it should be obvious to any critical observer that their reporting is biased.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            Do you happen to have a Tegra 2 based tablet…?

            • willmore
            • 8 years ago

            No, why? I don’t have an iPad of any kind, either. How is that relavant?

        • Deanjo
        • 8 years ago

        Proof is in the pudding. You might want to take off the anti-fanboi blinders.

        [url<]http://www.glbenchmark.com/compare.jsp?benchmark=glpro20&showhide=true&certified_only=1&D1=Apple%20iPad%202&D2=Motorola%20Xoom&D3=Apple%20iPad&D4=Samsung%20GT-P1000%20Galaxy%20Tab[/url<]

          • willmore
          • 8 years ago

          And PCmag says: [url<]http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2381767,00.asp[/url<] So? The reason none of these benchmarks can tell us much about the difference between the A5 and the Tegra2 is that none of them run the same OS. You're not benchmarking the chip, you're benchmarking the OS. Apple having an edge in graphics software? Who would have thought? I mean, they've only been shipping PCs with GUIs since 1984.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            LMFAO! Do you really think that the 3 to 5 x performance lead is from their software implementation? Last time I checked Nvidia still supplied the drivers for Tegra. I might also point out that Nvidia desktop linux drivers are on par for performance in Windows.

            • willmore
            • 8 years ago

            I was not aware that nvidia supplied a graphics driver to Google for use in Android on the Tegra2. From the lamenting I hear in the Andriod developer community about the quality of graphics drivers on Tegra 2, I had assumed it was an in house Google effort.

            And, yes, a 3x to 5x performance difference can easily be due to software. I’ve been following Linux graphics driver development for over a decade and software has often been responsible for 10-100x improvements or regressions. So, I really don’t find 3 to 5x to be hard to imagine.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            Yes Nvidia makes the android driver and is part of their development kit. It is closed off blob like most of the other android drivers. Congratulations on following Linux development for a decade even though it pales in comparison to my practical application and development in Linux by quite a few years. 10x-100x improvement is pure bullshit, you are lucky if developments result in a 2 – 50 [b<] percent [/b<]gains. Btw the REAL reasons why A5 stomps the Tegra 2 are listed here: [url<]http://www.notebookcheck.net/Analyst-explains-graphics-performance-gap-between-Apple-A5-and-Tegra-2.51124.0.html[/url<] Thanks for playin, please gather your consolation prize on the way out.

            • willmore
            • 8 years ago

            I’m not aware of your ‘practical application and development in Linux’. By pointing out how long I was following the graphical development in Linux, I was trying to provide the context by which I said that performance gains are often spectacular from early versions to latter ones. It wasn’t some veiled ‘my penis is bigger than yours’ arguement.

            WRT the quoted comments of *one* analyst–one *often quoted* analyst–I don’t buy it. I’ve read the original statement by the analyst and it clearly shows he does not understand the subject about which he comments. Go read it. It’s not even as well written as a Toms Hardware article. In the bigger picture, I find it humorous that you take the word of an analyst as anything other than the bald attempt to manipulate a stock price that it is.

    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    Dupe post

    • Scrotos
    • 8 years ago

    I already forget what Kal-El is. Is that the quad-core ARM? Or is that Denver? Or is Denver a 64-bit ARM?

      • Scrotos
      • 8 years ago

      Ah, scroll further in the news and I answer my own question: [url<]https://techreport.com/discussions.x/21681[/url<]

        • UberGerbil
        • 8 years ago

        You could’ve also just clicked the “disclosed” link in the story here.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    What kind of effect does the screen resolution have on these benchmarks? Some sort of effect, I’m sure. So if at 1280×800 it’s as fast as current-gen smart phones at 800×480, that’s good news indeed.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 8 years ago

      Too bad smartphones are moving towards 720p and tablets towards (or past) 1080p.

      Kal El will be sufficient for the first half 2012, but Wayne better push graphics performance more aggressively if nVidia wants to rule the high end market.

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