Steve Jobs dies

Apple founder and former CEO Steve Jobs has died. A tribute page on the Apple website delivers the news, along with a brief note:

May he rest in peace.

Comments closed
    • ish718
    • 8 years ago

    Steve Jobs is overrated… RIP

      • Headloser
      • 8 years ago

      I don’t think who would have thought Steve Jobs took over the company “again” that was one foot in the grave, turn it around and make it a $350 billion dollar company. In the process, made IPOD, IPAD, IPHONE and so on.
      He didn’t let anybody talk him out of his ideas and lived to the fullest of his life. I disagreed with some of his decisions, however, i would have not even believe he could have gone this far with Apple in the beginning.
      He didn’t sat on his ass and yell out order like Donald Trump. He actually work with the people in the program, designing and building the product.
      AND MAN he sure know how to sell the product when he on stage. WOW what a workmanship he can sell anything including the ice cuber maker at the North Pole given the chance. This was before the Global Warming of course.
      RIP. You earn it. I wouldn’t be surprised that he is building an IWING right now lol.

    • lukecarlson
    • 8 years ago

    Hare krishna!

    • DarkUltra
    • 8 years ago

    This was a surprise, but when I read up on pancreatic cancer it has very high death rate in just five years… I’ll always remember the iPhone 1g I got that revolutionized the smartphone market with its multi-touch input, hardware accelerated UI, excellent web browser and easy to use apps.

    • Mr Bill
    • 8 years ago

    A true genius of his kind. We will miss you Steve Jobs; Rest In Peace.

    • Coulda
    • 8 years ago

    He was the president of our market democracy. Elected by consumers who voted for him by buying his products. He told us what to buy and why we should buy them. He told us Apple products are cool and by purchasing them, we can better ourselves and fill empty void in our lives. Some of us attended his church of consumerism and listened to his sermons with unwavering faith. We lined up in his stores and handed over our money to buy his idea of Apple lifestyle. His technical achievements pales in comparison to cult of Apple consumerism he created. Our leader is gone… So sad…

    • ClickClick5
    • 8 years ago

    [url<]http://www.sheknows.com/entertainment/articles/843661/steve-wozniak-and-bill-gates-react-to-steve-jobs-death[/url<]

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    You know, something that’s been missed in all the “revolutionary” talk is a discussion about how we get our media, particularly music. If it wasn’t for the iTunes Music Store, I’m pretty sure all hope would be lost for the music maker – and while part of what I mean is that this is an instant-gratification alternative to piracy, it’s not entirely what I mean. I also mean for the self-published artist.

    I’ve looked into what it costs to get a physical CD produced, and it’s not cheap. You have a huge up-front cost in getting CDs pressed and cover art/liner notes printed, whereas if you release it digitally you make it up in a PDF and include it with the digital files. Sure you pay iTunes instead of whoever manufactured the CDs, but you do that at the point of sale rather than ahead of time. That by itself is huge for independent (non-studio) musicians. It’s really no different than publishing indie games on Steam, and it’s a glorious thing.

    • Anarchist
    • 8 years ago

    what happened? did Jesus die or something?

    • 3keepmovingforward3
    • 8 years ago

    First off I’m not an apple fan-boy. I’ve never owned anything apple, and I don’t know if I ever will (I might, you’ll see why later). I’m an FSU-PC Computer Engineering student. Steve Jobs’ ability to finish a product was astounding, but what I’d like to thank him for the most is bringing the
    PC into my home. The first one my family owned (IBM, man that’s funny right!) I took apart and sadly couldn’t get back together. Without his “Ease of Use” and “Everyone should be have and be able to use this” attitude, and without his “We’re going to build the best product we can” the personal computer landscape would be vastly different, less colorful, less passionate, less Apple.


    Benjamin Blouin
    [url<]http://flavors.me/3keepmovingforward3[/url<]

    • kristi_johnny
    • 8 years ago

    End of an Era πŸ™

      • PeterD
      • 8 years ago

      He’s the last active one of an important generation:
      – Steve Wozniak: quit
      – BIll Gates: quit
      – Sir Clive Sinclair: company went bust, and he worked on computers till his pension
      – Commodore: company went bus
      – Atari: what happend to them?
      – the BBC: yes! They also helped spreading the microcomputer in our households by making the BBC Micro
      – Steve Jobs: died.

      And you know what they all had in common?
      They all had to deal with the hardware.
      The current succefull IT companies are Amazon, Google, Facebook and the likes, and their products are hardware independant.
      Steve Jobs is the last pioneer of the hardware dependant developpers generation.

    • 5150
    • 8 years ago

    Steve Jobs – Brilliant CEO, awful philanthropist.

    Hopefully after his death I’ll be proven wrong. Being busy at work is no excuse.

      • ssidbroadcast
      • 8 years ago

      He’s one of the greatest philanthropist ever by de facto creating wealth. Any time there is a satisfied customer, the entrepreneur is already engaged in philanthropy. No charity required.

        • 5150
        • 8 years ago

        Yeah, I guess that’s all he could’ve ever done. /rollseyes

        • blitzy
        • 8 years ago

        how many suicidal chinese workers did it take for that one satisfied customer?

        I really don’t see why everyone is so giddy with how great Steve Jobs was and how he made our lives so much better through technology. He’s a glorified PR and marketing guy who was highly motivated and managed a company well, good for him. That doesn’t change the fact that his company is basically the embodiment of greed.

          • Anonymous Coward
          • 8 years ago

          [quote<]He's a glorified PR and marketing guy who was highly motivated and managed a company well, good for him. That doesn't change the fact that his company is basically the embodiment of greed.[/quote<] Ridiculous. Jobs drove Apple to become the embodiment of [i<]success[/i<] and it was not obtained by excessive screwing over of customers or competitors. Jobs and Apple where an excellent role model.

          • NeelyCam
          • 8 years ago

          [quote<]how many suicidal chinese workers did it take for that one satisfied customer?[/quote<] How many suicidal chinese workers did it take to make that non-apple phone, laptop, desktop, monitor...?

          • demani
          • 8 years ago

          Unlike which other company? Microsoft? Oracle? IBM? HP? AMD or Intel?

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        YEAH… that argument is SO full of holes it’s not funny. that’s a little R&P for this section though…

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 8 years ago

      Are there any known Steve Jobs donations at all? I’ve always heard that he didn’t give any of his money away, but you would actually have to try pretty hard to never give any money away.

        • 5150
        • 8 years ago

        No, there are claims that he “possibly” made a large anonymous donation to a California cancer center, but nothing solid. He started a foundation and then closed it shortly after because I think he said he was too busy to deal with it. Most of what he has been quoted saying sure make it sound like he wasn’t too willing to donate his money to worthy causes.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          the only major donation you’ll likely find proof of is:
          [url<]http://www.macuser.com/legal/apple_donates_100000_to_fight.php[/url<]

            • 5150
            • 8 years ago

            That’s just to appease their users.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            Possible, i’m not going to jump into that discussion though…

      • heinsj24
      • 8 years ago

      When is it a requirement that someone be a philanthropist? I really could casre less if Steve was giving away money or not. It’s his contribution to the world of personal computers that matters most to me. Andrew Carnegie didn’t become a philanthropist until he retired – Steve left Apple a scant 40 days ago.

      However, for the record, International Business Times is reporting that his wife, Laurene, is a business woman and philanthropist.

      • shaq_mobile
      • 8 years ago

      It may also be good to remember that the philanthropy of the purest nature would be that done in secrecy, only to benefit the institution or cause and NOT a PR stunt. Though it’s not necessarily a bad thing for one’s generosity to be known, the true spirit of giving is to be generous without expectation and with no strings attached. Jobs may have donated more than we know. I guess the point is to try and reserve judgment, for we hardly know what he did with his money or his life. All we see is the business man, products and snippets from blogs and interviews.

        • TurtlePerson2
        • 8 years ago

        That’s true, but Steve Jobs had a lot of influence. Him advocating a charity would go a long way. It’s not just that he did not give away any money, it’s also that he didn’t seem to stand for anything at all. Looking at the facts and not the hype makes it seem as though he existed solely for the purpose of making money.

        By the way, when he returned to Apple as CEO he cut ALL of the philanthropic activities Apple was involved in.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          one of tim cooks first acts was reinstating some
          [url<]http://www.macrumors.com/2011/09/08/apple-institutes-new-charitable-matching-program-for-employees/[/url<]

          • shaq_mobile
          • 8 years ago

          That’s too bad, I didn’t know that. πŸ™

          I wonder why he did that…

    • YellaChicken
    • 8 years ago

    Goodbye Steve, I’ve never owned a single Apple product yet you still, somehow, have managed to affect both my life and my career.

    R.I.P

    • 5150
    • 8 years ago

    I was ribbing the local Macolyte at work this morning about Jobs dying. He says, “WHAT!?” He didn’t know Jobs died until I told him because he has no TV, didn’t listen to the radio, and his Macbook hard drive died on him yesterday. LOL

    • Neutronbeam
    • 8 years ago

    I’m saddened by the loss of a true auteur, who knew what he wanted and made no compromises–ever.

    Steve Jobs’ company and his vision have touched my life directly in many ways since at least 1986. Back then I convinced my father to buy a Mac for his writing, and he has written or edited more than 40 published books on the many Macs he’s owned–he got a new Mac Air last month; the machines at least doubled or tripled his productivity for approximately 25 years. My first computer was a 128K Mac that was a hand-me-down from my father, and I wrote my masters thesis on it–and played very crude computer games, and I’m still a gamer. My wife has an iPhone, and my son adores his iPod Touch, while I watch movies and listen to music on iTunes.

    I’ll also point out that possibly many people in this forum personally benefitted from his tenure at Apple–including me, and I’m grateful to him for that, and I hope some of you are as well. I know that for at least one of my mutual fund investments, Apple stock makes up one of its 10 largest holdings, and the increase in its value has helped me for years.

    Goodbye Mr. Jobs, and thanks for all the Macs, iTunes, iPods, iPhones, and iPads. In your way you left the world a better place then when you entered it, and you helped me. Vaya con Dios!

    • ThorAxe
    • 8 years ago

    Some legacy….

    He interviewed scores of workers and toured the factories while posing as a US businessman and was shocked to learn that people were literally being worked to death to meet Western gadget lust. From long hours to inhumane and robotic working and living conditions to suicide and child labour, Daisey saw things that switched off his innate desire to always have the latest piece of kit.

    [url<]http://www.smh.com.au/technolo[/url<]​gy/technology-news/the-dark-si​de-of-apple-one-mans-monologue​-of-misery-20110930-1l0hg.html

    • yogibbear
    • 8 years ago

    EDIT. /wrists.

    • sweatshopking
    • 8 years ago

    wow…. some of the posts on here are WAY out of hand. let’s be gentlemen, if at all possible.

    • yogibbear
    • 8 years ago

    Did someone hack apple and post this as a joke? How can he be dead? He only just switched jobs?…. This is ridiculous?!

    • hiro_pro
    • 8 years ago

    how long before we see another true innovator like him?

      • FuturePastNow
      • 8 years ago

      Could be tomorrow or twenty years from now. With the tech industry, you never can know.

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      Jeff Bezos has potential.

        • esterhasz
        • 8 years ago

        I agree – not that I know anything about JB’s abilities but Amazon is currently the only major company in the tech sector besides Apple that seems to make it’s decisions based on a strategic vision that goes beyond the next five quarters. Let’s not forget that the Kindle came out long before the iPad.

        • PeterD
        • 8 years ago

        He doesn’t have the same sex appeal, euh, charisma.
        As a matter of fact: does anybody know how Bezos looks like?

          • NeelyCam
          • 8 years ago

          I saw a picture on BusinessWeek. He looks more like Lloyd Blankfein than Steve Jobs. A happy looking fella, although Blankfein was very happy funneling other people’s money to GS pockets..

      • Headloser
      • 8 years ago

      I don’t think we ever will in our lifetime. A very rare person indeed.

    • PeterD
    • 8 years ago

    (no suitable words come to mind, let’s be silent)

    • smilingcrow
    • 8 years ago

    I hate Apple but I felt really sad when I read this news.

    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    Sort of remarkable how close he cut it to the wire before quitting his job… wonder if he knew he was going to die no matter what and just wanted to do what he loved till he was at the doorstep…

      • PeterD
      • 8 years ago

      He was a Buddhist. Buddhist believe in reincarnation.

        • shaq_mobile
        • 8 years ago

        maybe he’ll come back as a droid phone πŸ™

          • PeterD
          • 8 years ago

          I don’t think his karma is that bad. πŸ™‚

            • shaq_mobile
            • 8 years ago

            hehe πŸ™‚

    • Meadows
    • 8 years ago

    To rhyme with their motto, what I am after hearing this is [b<][i<]indifferent[/i<].[/b<]

    • Suspenders
    • 8 years ago

    In addition to being a tech visionary, he was also a great CEO, maybe one of the few left in US business. Most companies nowadays seem to be “run” by extremely expensive retards or just outright corrupt criminals, so it’s doubly sad to see an example of what good corporate leadership is, pass away. Did you know that his pay is still $1 a year?

    Good luck to you Steve, wherever you are. And damn you cancer!

      • Deanjo
      • 8 years ago

      Did you know that Steve kept every dollar check?

      • rxc6
      • 8 years ago

      On a related note, $1 paycheck is not as “impressive” once you consider stock options have a better tax rate and apple stock has increased its value incredibly.

        • EtherealN
        • 8 years ago

        Retroactively issuing stock options for further tax cuts is also a neat trick. πŸ˜€

        Not that I mind it, smart thing to do, but the “pay” would have had to be very very big indeed to be noticeable on his monetary income.

        (A lot of business leaders in my country do similar things; get some funds set up on a banking island, and take payment in stock options issued to that fund. Taxfree millions FTW! πŸ™‚ )

          • destroy.all.monsters
          • 8 years ago

          To the tremendous loss of all the rest of us. Multiply that by each corporation doing the same thing and there you have our fiscal crisis.

            • EtherealN
            • 8 years ago

            Actually, no, the “fiscal” crisis (which there is none – there is a “financial”, big difference) is caused by different things: reliance on bad credit instruments for the 2008 meltdown, and government overspending for the current issues.

            In the case of the USA, if you were to take all the money earned, through all means, of all the “big guys”, you’d buy something like a week of federal spending.

            The current crisis is caused by politicians not understanding that spending money you don’t have is a sure way to cause trouble later. You can buy your way out through just keeping it up and getting more loans to pay for your previous loans, and thus keep overspending, but then you’re just buying time for a way bigger crash whenever you can’t keep it up anymore.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            I don’t agree with your description at all. with no links, you have no credibility.

            • End User
            • 8 years ago

            LOL!

            You? Talking about credibility?!?! I just pissed my pants.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            because you were aroused? i β™₯ you too….

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            I love you so much, i double posted! πŸ™‚

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            Future planning needs coordinated investment. The current health care system will blow any and all budgets in the future. Globalization will equalize worker salaries meaning lower salaries in the USA (or, alternatively, loss of manufacturing to other countries).

            The only way to truly increase wealth is to improve the efficiency of producing refinement of necessities (food, water, shelter/heat/cooling, health, transportation) and luxuries (cars, electronics, entertainment) alike. To get those efficiency improvements, education and training needs to be improved, and focus should be on improving that efficiency of [b<]producing value[/b<] (manufacturing, product development, agriculture) instead of developing more effective and complicated methods of [b<]transferring value[/b<] (banking, investment entities, wall street trading). Transferring value = zero sum game. Producing value = everybody wins. When those efficiency improvements yield more wealth, that extra value needs to be distributed more evenly across the population (as opposed to the current U.S. system where the extra value trickles to the top) - otherwise the system isn't stable and sustainable. Hmm.. a bit off-the-article-topic, eh?

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            LOL. i gave you a +1 for being sane. i think you might be like me, and get a – just because the post was a neely post. you’re right though. Planning horizons, and a just, moral society MUST be brought about, or we’re going tits up! R&P gets me hot

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            My posts have a standard -2 handicap; anything above that implies a post worth reading.

            US will go tits up regardless, because greed is the american way, and those who do greed better will win while others lose.

            EDIT: just wanted to elaborate that I meant greed is the [b<]USA way[/b<] - the northern folks of North America can still be saved.

    • trackerben
    • 8 years ago

    I think we’re all going to miss to some degree the fashionable news emanating from the penumbra surrounding Mr. Jobs’ figurehead.

    He was a great captain of industry and even greater shaper of modern culture, a tool whose spirit burned brightly in the short time he had. I do wish peace for those close to him.

    • ronch
    • 8 years ago

    Even if I’m not an Apple fan, I’ve watched from a distance and admired Steve as one of Silicon Valley’s greatest icons. Thanks a lot, Steve. The world’s a better place because of you.

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 8 years ago

      The same world where people can grow up thinking that computers “just work” and the moment something breaks/isn’t working perfectly to go out and buy another one. The same thought processes that get infused into our youth that expand to other facets of life…Why learn about something when you can rely on a machine to tell for you ?

    • FatherXmas
    • 8 years ago

    Steve Jobs wasn’t a programmer. He wasn’t an engineer. He wasn’t a designer. He was someone who thought there was always a better way to do something and he could recognize it when he saw it. He lived outside “the box”.

    He also recognize the personal computer as something that wasn’t just the purview of business or engineers or programmers. He saw it as a tool that could unlock one’s creativity. A tool to make everyone’s life easier. A device for everyone.

    Of course he wasn’t perfect. He had his vaults. His companies had missteps.

    And he will be missed.

    Rest in peace Steve, rest in peace.

      • Jambe
      • 8 years ago

      I don’t think he “lived outside the box” so much as he was astute at observing and modifying the various boxes that he encountered. The man didn’t strike me so much as an inventor and creator in his own right (though we was those things). He struck me more as a very capable manager of creative talent and a prescient trend-observer.

    • Decelerate
    • 8 years ago

    For anyone else Pixar would be a lifetime achievement, for him it would be a side project…

    Rest in Peace

    • leor
    • 8 years ago

    Wow he went out hard, worked right up until the end . . .

    • koziolek-matolek
    • 8 years ago

    Tyrell: The light that burns twice as bright burns half as long – and you have burned so very, very brightly, Roy.

    • ub3r
    • 8 years ago

    Apple needs to hire Steve Wozniak ASAP.

    • RealityChk
    • 8 years ago

    RIP,
    Never agreed with some of the philosophy but still respected the
    energy behind the his action. He was willing to put the bucks on the
    line — he KEPT Gates in line\check for good or bad its you desicision,

    Again RIP.

    • luisnhamue
    • 8 years ago

    I just cant believe!

    • Malphas
    • 8 years ago

    Good riddance.

      • Thresher
      • 8 years ago

      What kind of twisted bastard do you have to be to be glad someone is dead? How messed up must your life be if you feel the need to come in and crap on a thread of people expressing their condolences for a man who inarguably had an outsized impact on technology, the whole reason we come to this site.

      Pathetic. This is one of those cases where your mom was right: If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all.

    • Rakhmaninov3
    • 8 years ago

    Never realized I’d be this bummed out when this happened for real.

    I’m kind of imagining him being resorbed into the Force at the end.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 8 years ago

    When I heard the news I was at my cubicle. I nearly cried at my desk but was able to keep my sh** together until I got to my car. πŸ™

      • 5150
      • 8 years ago

      Wow, hate to find out how you respond to the death of someone you actually know.

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        Maybe he ssidbroadcast did know him.

        • revcrisis
        • 8 years ago

        ROFL hahahaha

      • Rakhmaninov3
      • 8 years ago

      +1

      Can’t always predict how something like this will hit you

    • Sunburn74
    • 8 years ago

    He was only 56. Life is pretty short. Get the most out of it whilst you can,

      • vargis14
      • 8 years ago

      Well RIP,
      His life was fairly short,But he was very influential and intuitive.But one thing is for sure he led a great life better then 99.999% of everyone,yes he fought his health battles and got a replacement liver faster then anyone besides a senator ect.Allways felt he was bumped to the front of the list for it,but thats just my opinion.His family has my condolences.

      Now the geniuses at the apple stores have a deity since you cannot be one in life.

      • Wirko
      • 8 years ago

      Was Jimi Hendrix’s life “short”? Maybe but only if one uses years to measure it.

    • Sunburn74
    • 8 years ago

    He was only 56. Life is pretty short. Get the most out of it whilst you can,

    • Fighterpilot
    • 8 years ago

    “3 Apples changed the world, 1st one seduced Eve, 2nd fell on Newton and the 3rd was offered to the world half bitten by Steve Jobs”.

    Shame to see him taken before his time.
    Props to the company he built.

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 8 years ago

      You just compared Steve Jobs to Newton? Newton opened our minds, Steve Jobs closed it.

        • Meadows
        • 8 years ago

        An achievement is an achievement, you only changed its sign.

        • Corrado
        • 8 years ago

        Do you honestly believe that computing and gadgets would be where it is today with Jobs? The Mac, the Newton, the iPod and the iPhone all DRASTICALLY changed the way consumers looked at tech. You REALLY think Android would exist without the iPhone? We’d still be using gussied up WinMo 6.0 and BlackBerry 5 had the iPhone not come and kicked them in the ass. This also opened the door for Android to the market as well.

          • EtherealN
          • 8 years ago

          Well, considering that Google purchased Android a year and a half before the iPhone was unveiled…
          (Android was purchased in August 2005, iPhone was presented in January 2007.)

          …so yeah, Android would exist without the iPhone, because it did… πŸ˜‰

            • lilbuddhaman
            • 8 years ago

            Get your facts out of here, this is Apple we’re talking about !

            • kamikaziechameleon
            • 8 years ago

            ha, lol. I think that to discredit jobs with what his closed platform approach allowed him to do and change gadgets into functioning products for normal people is a bit of a short sale.

        • Wirko
        • 8 years ago

        And Adam and Eve were the first jailbreakers in history.

          • mduncan62
          • 8 years ago

          LOL

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 8 years ago

        While there is legitimacy to your statement I would argue that jobs is probably the most influential mind in tech today. He’s changed the way the industry and market exist.

        • samurai1999
        • 8 years ago

        And the first Apple never existed …

      • Jambe
      • 8 years ago

      Ugh. I hope Jobs didn’t promulgate hateful, misogynist, patriarchal hooey in his personal sphere. In fact I believe he was Buddhist, so good on him in that regard.

        • atryus28
        • 8 years ago

        “promulgate hateful, misogynist, patriarchal hooey” It’s a shame you are so uninformed.

          • Jambe
          • 8 years ago

          Right, Eve being conjured from the rib of primordial man and being the source of our species fall from “grace” is not at all hateful, misogynist, or patriarchal.

          Right, Genesis has never been used to justify hateful anti-woman practices and beliefs since the 6th century. Either you are shamefully ignorant of what I presume is your own cultural baggage or you’re a troll.

          Now, I’m somewhat familiar with biblical criticism and the history of Judea, so I’ve been exposed to the many various “fair” or “non-sex-skewed” interpretations of Genesis. The problem is, they’re all clearly apologetic β€” regardless of whether Eve was originally viewed as an inferior subject of Adam, she [b<]was[/b<] created secondarily and she [b<]was[/b<] the conduit of the tree's knowledge via a scheming deceiver. She was also given a wicked and cruel punishment by Yahweh who would later cement his nasty demeanor by proving himself a jealous, paranoid, genocidal tyrant. *shrug* Steve Jobs.

        • standingmammoth
        • 8 years ago

        Oh yeah, because you see so many women monks in Tibet. Please, the most conservative sects of Buddhism are just as bad as the most conservative sects of Christianity in this regard.

          • trackerben
          • 8 years ago

          Patrilocality/Patriachy is prevalent in 90% of known cultures. This may be due to evolutionary biology, to stochastics in sociocultural development, or to a received mean in moral predisposition. Those with a less naturalistic POV do not dissmiss the last possibility based on historical evidence as well current science.

          A dose of history is useful here. What most surprises people when they first read up the NT writers is how radical their bottom-up presciptions were for reforming the atavistic societies of their era. Letters by the writer known as Paul would begin with as many first-name salutations to women as men. The author John wrote explicitly of “brothers and sisters in spirit” as Jesus’ sole family, his church. This radically countered the consanguinous tribal relationships which prevailed in those times.

          Women were cited for their leadership and contributions in church as well as household matters. The only area where women were not explicitly sanctioned for service was in doctrinal delivery. Early christians were taught to seek flat relationships between social hierarchies based on shared national and transcendental values, a revolution before its time in an age of polyglot empires held together by men of force and ability. Sadly, these original “before-its-time’ societies were persecuted or diluted away in successive counter-revolutions. The authentic groups of folk were displaced by more impersonal, “imperial” institutions staffed by elites, the foundational doctrines obscured and/or reinstituted by co-opted councils pursuing state patronage and protection.

          Apologetic Edit: My wild digression into speculation of Jobs’ character as modeling Hasshashin seems innappropriate given his death, so away it goes.

          • kamikaziechameleon
          • 8 years ago

          I don’t think any religion is predominantly sexist most of the perceived sexism as sighted here is derived from culture and not explicitly the faith itself.

            • EtherealN
            • 8 years ago

            The faith is part of the culture though. Culture influences faith, faith influences culture.

            Personally I wish people would let their cultures be influenced by cool stuff like amazing discoveries in science rather than their own personal preference for magic skydaddies and superstitions about souls and the afterlife, but that’s just me. What makes the contributions of Jobs (and I don’t particularly like him, but he did contribute massively) so valuable is that he used his one short life to do that. He had this one life, and he could spend it any way he wanted. He wanted to try to change the world through his tech businesses. He succeeded. That’s totally awesome.

            In my personal opinion, faith would rob a lot of the dignity from that by diminishing it.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            “In my personal opinion, faith would rob a lot of the dignity from that by diminishing it.”
            then you don’t understand it at all. You’re superiority over a unfalsifiable question is arrogant. You’re no more able to prove that you are correct, than Buddha was able to prove he was. He, however, changed the course of human history, and you’re arguing with morons (myself included) on the internet. I think you kinda lose that one…

            • EtherealN
            • 8 years ago

            I understand it quite well – I grew up in a fundamentalist home. πŸ˜‰
            Going from “this life is just one of many” or “this life is just preparation for some eternal bliss/damnation” to “this life is all I’ve got” has a MASSIVE impact on the value of this life.

            Your talk of proving correctness is however greatly mistaken: you never prove a negative, ever. It is up to those who make a positive statement to overcome the null hypothesis, and faith tries to get around this through saying that we don’t need evidence to believe wild shepherd’s tales because it’s “a matter of faith”.

            Also, changing the course of human history is not an end in itself; a lot of people have managed to do that, and not all of them in a good direction. Bush changed the course of human history, so did Bin Ladin. This is just an observed fact which in itself is devoid of moral judgement, and by itself does not lend value to what they’ve done.

            That is my point; Steve Jobs impacted the one and only life I have, using the one and only life he had. I may not be a great fan of Apple products, but I have massively enjoyed my old iPod Classic and the iPad is what finally made my father able to use e-mail in work. That’s tangible effects he has had on my life, and I value them greatly. But if this life is just some endless cycle in the quest to end it all through Nirvana or some school quest to join Jahve in heaven… Those things are so much smaller and so pointless.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            if you view the lives as a total, then i suppose. If you view each as an individual, but part of a whole, I don’t see how it’s any different.

            on your Never prove a negative point, it’s not quite accurate. James Randi, who famously says “you can’t prove a negative”, has justifiably received criticism as an over simplification.

            “Steven Hales points out that the second law of thought is a sort of negative; “it is not the case that a thing can be X and not X at the same time”. What’s more, any argument can be expressed in its negative form. For example, to the extent that you can prove that you are real (a positive argument), you can also prove that you are not imaginary. Whether an argument is phrased as a positive or negative can be arbitrary”

            It comes down to semantics.

            The changing of human history is of course the end. what other purpose could Buddha (or any other prophet) have claimed? Of course people have influenced in both directions. The fact that a man was able to reach the entire world 2500 years ago, before any method of communication, is amazing. I don’t agree that it lends no value or devoid of moral judgment. the morality comes from the impact. hitler, not good, Buddha, good. that argument says no action has any value, which is incorrect. to state that THE ACT OF INFLUENCING HISTORY has moral value, well obviously, that would’t be true. but the results of the impact have morality.

            I appreciate that you feel more of an impact looking at it from a purely physical perspective. that’s cool. I just don’t necessarily agree that it trivializes his impact. I just don’t view it that way. I can also appreciate that your fundamentalist upbringing can make such beliefs tricky. It’s not for everyone, myself included.

            • EtherealN
            • 8 years ago

            Well, first off, I disagree that the Buddha had a “good” impact. His impact was to teach people that life is misery and the goal of life should be to end life – specifically to end your cycle of rebirth such that you can end suffering. I prefer to end suffering not through ending life.

            Regarding positive statements and framing them, I also do not agree. Stating, for example, that “there is a god” or “there is a space teapot orbiting saturn” is a positive statement: it posits a fact that can be verified. Some people object on God, stating that it is outside of “science”, but this is incorrect: if God is able to affect the world, we can see those effects, thus he is proveable. Similar with the teapot: if I say it is there, I can offer evidence to this effect. However, for the inverse, to say that “there absolutely is no god” or “there absolutely is no teapot”, requires omniscience to prove it, and we have no reason to believe that omniscience is even possible. This is why science operates on the null hypothesis; you start with the positive statement and try to disprove the hypothesis that it is false. In the case of god: through actually finding him. In the case of the teapot: through observing it.

            It does of course get more complex once you start taking epistemological considerations and start allowing for other effects – such as our fallible minds. If I were to suddenly see angels come down and talk to me, I would hypothesise that I am insane or is experiencing a temporal lobe seizure, and if I were to re-tell the story and ask others to believe it, I would expect them to test this first.

            I don’t quite get what you mean by your talk of negations and the law of identity though. If you could elaborate on that it might be interesting to consider.

            • trackerben
            • 8 years ago

            That was a nice retracing of the simple Baconian method. Falsifiability was a latter Popperian criterion establish to reduce weak hypothesizing. Attempts at “settling the science ” in grand yet still-theoretical frameworks are also more common. Maybe as so much collective knowledge has been gained, that many are again putting blind faith in that so many early scientists warned us against, the conceit that humanity has the unbounded capacity to semiotically reconcile everything observable with everything not.

            Do you remember the Philosphy of Science thingy you might dismiss as “magic”? The transcendent worldviews which informed revolutionaries and radicals such as Francis Bacon, aka ‘father of modern science” ? His biblical views and poetry were as famously elegant as his reasoning, and what he found in his studies of the ancient texts led him to champion empiricism and induction as the foundations of modern scientific discovery.

            The earlier Roger Bacon, aka “father of the scientific method”, taught that our material universe was rationally intelligible to our minds. He did not just assume, he trusted that all objects and processes extant were subject to higher laws and axioms, immaterial entities subject to an immaterially higher origin and explanation, a superagency external to the material facts. That the explanatory agent was also the personable God of the Abrahamic OT and NT, is not just a significant belief but a salient one. The independence of thought found in this radical system of beliefs helps to counter the dogmatic mindsets which always seem to be coming back in vogue in every era.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            well, i’ll start on your first paragraph, since it’s the beginning. I would say that Buddha DID teach life was misery. for your average indian in 2500 BC, it was. What he taught was that despite the misery, it was still a valuable thing. Whether or not you agree with his final philosophical views, on what the FINAL goal is, the reality is that he encouraged morality, and taught people the value that a just life has. The point of religion is the unify, and improve human existence. if it fails to do that, do away with it. If it becomes ideology, which most of it has, it’s no longer living in reality, it’s trying to shape reality to it’s views, and as such, is worthless. Or even less than worthless, it can become quite destructive. I’m not saying this is the case with Buddhism, i’m merely stating that old adage, You will know a good tree by it’s fruits, and I think Buddha has a pretty good legacy, even if you don’t agree with his philosophical views.

            On the positive statements, you could also say “the universe was created by its self”. this is a positive statement, it’s just not physically verifiable, any more than “there is a God”. I understand what you’re saying, I just would say that God works with science, as that’s how the universe was created, and that the universe IS rational, and understandable. Science is the way we understand God, and his creation. A positive statement is “everything has a creator, as that’s consistent with all observation”, does it being positive impact the value of the statement? This is a consistent thought in science, that every action has a reaction, and that something cannot come from nothing. If science PROVED there was no God, I would be a fool to believe in him. I don’t see that being possible. I don’t believe in a man on a cloud pointing fingers, and making magic happen. That’s not a rational belief. I believe the universe had a creator, I cannot fathom what he’d be like, nor how you’d ever begin to search for him in the physical realm. I don’t believe you’d get very far, as that’s not an area he seems to spend a lot of time, as i don’t believe he “spends a lot of time” anywhere. Anyway, it’s an interesting discussion. I am a theist, but I believe science and religion must agree.

            On the Law of Identity, I’m a Baha’i, and my opinions are reasonably consistent with my faith. Our view is that the human soul is eternal, and that it travels through many different “worlds”, or planes, or what ever you want to call them, on a never ending journey to get closer to God. Each has it’s value, and it’s merit. there are things to learn in each. What each will be, God only knows, but that every human life has individual value, as a human, as we each have individual capacities and abilities. We should respect and cherish what we have, and share with humanity, and strive to achieve as much as we can of our capacities, whether they be bucket loads or only a thimble full. Steve’s achievements as a man, are great, they’re not diminished because of his soul, merely part of something greater, but worthy on their own.

            I should say, your reply was surprising genial, and caught me a bit off guard. if i’m not concise, let me know if you need clarification. I just typed this up quickly, so it might do with some review.

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      Uh, in between #2 and #3, there was a little music company called ‘Apple’ that had a lot of fans, too….

      • PeterD
      • 8 years ago

      But Steve Wozniak was the real genius at Apple. It was he who made it possible to sell the first pc for less than 1000 dollars. Steve Jobs was completely different.

        • dpaus
        • 8 years ago

        They were both geniuses, and both types of talent were needed for success.

    • just brew it!
    • 8 years ago

    Sad news indeed. Regardless of whether you love, hate, or are indifferent to Apple and/or their products, you’ve gotta admit Mr. Jobs was a creative genius who changed the face of high tech forever. Multiple times!

    RIP, Steve. Most of the rest of us can only aspire to have even 1/1000th of the impact you did.

    • Ardrid
    • 8 years ago

    While I can’t say I’ve been a huge fan of Apple or Jobs’ way of doing things, I can give him the credit and respect he deserves for innovating at times and saving Apple from the brink of destruction.

    R.I.P. Steve.

    • willyolio
    • 8 years ago

    wow. he was pulling it really close when he resigned.

      • sschaem
      • 8 years ago

      My thought, he almost died on the job. One can only hope he had fun doing his job…

        • dashbarron
        • 8 years ago

        One of the recent podcasts here talked about that picture of Jobs the day he resigned. He looked awful and not something you’d wish on anyone. The consensus from the boys here was the picture was not PhotoShoped.

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      Those on here who are Canadians feared the worst when he announced he was stepping down, as we’d all just seen the exact same pattern with Jack Layton, a similarly polarizing but equally loved politician here in The Great White North. Jack too beat a first round of cancer, achieved great personal goals, and then announced that he was ‘taking some time’ to deal with a second bout of cancer – and passed away just two months later. If I’m not mistaken, Steve stepped down as CEO two months ago.

        • Deanjo
        • 8 years ago

        I knew someone would try to draw parallels to Layton. Difference being is that Steve did do things that made REAL differences in peoples lives (showing the personal computer was a viable product for example). Layton however did nothing but gather the undecided or pissed off vote from the previous minority and lumped it together. Given a choice as to whom has been more influential to mankind there is without a doubt that Jobs had more of an influence then Layton could have ever dreamt of.

          • effel
          • 8 years ago

          Wow, that’s remarkably cold and thoroughly attempts to underplay the achievements of a man who didn’t reach for the all-mightly dollar. Jack Layton may have not made millions in conjuring trendy tech, but he did have a positive influence on Canada and the world around it and many would agree he worked tirelessly to make Canada a better place. To claim he could have never risen beyond some abstract, truly incomparable bar you define as Jobs’ pinnacle of “influence” is just nonsense.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            What did Jack Layton actually achieve? NOTHING! He made promises that he couldn’t keep so that suckers would vote for him. Nothing more, nothing less.

            • cynan
            • 8 years ago

            Your argument is irrelevant.

            The comparison was made simply because Jack Layton was another public figure who died recently from cancer (or related complications) after stepping down from his position only a month or so before hand. Both Jobs and Layton achieved some of their greatest personal victories in the midst of their battle with illness and, arguably, only by perservering until the very end, where most other people (rightly or wrongly – who can judge) would have thrown in the towel.

            I was never a huge proponent of Layton or the NDP myself. However, both him and Jobs touched the lives of many people in their very different avenues. Your stance on Canadian federal politics has absolutely nothing to do with this fact. Save your vitriole for a more appropriate forum for a R&P debate.

          • ronch
          • 8 years ago

          Ok, your point may be valid, but please do respect the dead, no matter what their achievements may or may not be. There’s nothing more they could receive except our respect, so we might as well give it to them.

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            I do respect the dead, I do not however put them on some unjustified pedestal like Layton has been placed on by some. I have lost people in the same manner as Layton and Jobs to cancer with the same verve for their profession but you cannot tell me that a minority politician made more of an influence then in peoples lives then even a school teacher suffering from the same ordeal. Layton’s legacy is an “also ran” vs some one that truly has shaped the world we live in.

            • Johnny5
            • 8 years ago

            For the people that voted for him he presumably best represented the ideals and opinions they favoured. It quite reasonably follows from this that when he died a great number of people would feel they’d lost someone that mattered. It’s not the point that he didn’t matter to everybody, he mattered to enough people. Maybe a lot of people do care about him more now that he’s dead than when he was alive, but it’s understandable and really is the norm for just about every person that dies prematurely.
            Is it really so important that he not get more respect than you think he deserves that you’d speak poorly of the dead? If he’s just an ‘also ran’ to you why bother belittling him?

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            i’m not partisan, and wouldn’t vote NDP. it’s really hardly relevant. You’re being kinda dickish though. you’d probably want to tone that back a bit.

        • shaq_mobile
        • 8 years ago

        If Patrick Swazye couldn’t beat it. No one can. He was in Road House.

          • 5150
          • 8 years ago

          Road House.

            • shaq_mobile
            • 8 years ago

            [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fb4HlIBDOjQ[/url<]

      • ronch
      • 8 years ago

      People who are really passionate about what they’re doing do it until the very end. That’s just what they’re born to do. Reminds me of my grandpa. He was a chef in the old days. Cooked until his last day at home.

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 8 years ago

      Typically even if it’s in remission you get about 6 years. Ten if you’re lucky. I loved his passion about the new campus and although I wasn’t a fan of a lot he’d done since returning to Apple I wish he’d been able to see it completed.

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      Sort of reminds me of Freddie Mercury. On one day I learn that he has AIDS, the next day he’s dead.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 8 years ago

    Not a fan of Apple stuff but I have to say this was sad news to hear.

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    RIP Steve.

    No matter how history and people will end up judging you.

    You have made considerable contributions to personal electronics and personal computing.

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      Looks like the Apple-haters are out in full storm……

      FYI, I don’t personally own any Apple products, but you have to admit they do make some solid hardware and software platforms.

        • dpaus
        • 8 years ago

        What are you talking about? There’s no hating go on here, all I see is a lot of people expressing their regrets at the news, each in their own way.

          • Krogoth
          • 8 years ago

          They are here. They are downvoting anything that resembles anything that is remotely positive.

          The butt-hurting is strong in a certain portion of this crowd.

            • Meadows
            • 8 years ago

            You’re the only one butthurt, because [i<]you're the only person who mentioned it[/i<]. (And I won't even cover the terrible grammar of your opening comment.)

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            Nice try.

            I give it a 1/10.

            I take that you are still mad?

    • dpaus
    • 8 years ago

    Steve, please say you left the recipe for the RDF in your will.

    Farewell….

      • mav451
      • 8 years ago

      Seriously dude, it’s too soon.

        • lilbuddhaman
        • 8 years ago

        Nah

      • pedro
      • 8 years ago

      Good thing they’ve got the iCloud ready just in time!

        • axeman
        • 8 years ago

        The iCloud runs on Windows Azure, no?

    • kdashjl
    • 8 years ago

    we will miss you

    • Thresher
    • 8 years ago

    It’s really hard to overestimate the impact Jobs has had not just on computing, but on the country at large. Before Jobs (and Woz), computers were mainframes or hobby kits. After him, we had PCs. Even his early products had style, but when he returned, his sense of design went far from just PCs into the products we use every day. While he may not have actually designed them, he knew what would work and wouldn’t. Even the company’s failures under his lead usually turned out to just be products released before their time.

    Now, the hagiographies will begin. He will be further lionized, and for good reason. But Apple was not Steve Jobs and Steve Jobs was not Apple. Certainly, his DNA is central to the aesthetic and marketing. But Apple cannot afford to start thinking “What would Steve do?” every time they consider a product. That way is the path of stagnation. They will be afraid to take new risks or open new markets.

    There is an example: Back after Walt Disney died, the company languished. They were paralyzed by the fear that they would not be following the path that Disney himself would have created. From the early 70’s until the early 80’s, the company became extraordinarily conservative. It wasn’t until Eisner came in and shook things up that the company blossomed again.

    Apple cannot do this. We expect more from them. We expect them to lead.

      • rxc6
      • 8 years ago

      The difference is that we already know what happened to Apple without Jobs. The big difference now is that the legacy that he leaves is way bigger than what he left the first time. If anything we already saw that the iPhone 4S is missing a real “wow” effect. In the fiercer current market competition, they needed something more. The whole one iphone to rule it all and the old models to cover the basics does not seem like a good strategy. It doesn’t matter to me if Apple leads or not, however I don’t see them doing it for much longer.

        • Thresher
        • 8 years ago

        I hope you are wrong, but it’s my fear that they will just become another consumer products company.

    • flip-mode
    • 8 years ago

    This is certainly a loss. Thanks for all the immeasurable good you did for personal technology Steve.

    Sent from my Android.

    • albundy
    • 8 years ago

    Its too bad he really didn’t live life to the fullest. He had the chance and should have known better when his doctors first told him about his health. He chose corporatism over taking it easy for a while and in the end, he paid the price. Long live the investors! LoL!

      • etrigan420
      • 8 years ago

      How do you know that he *didn’t* live life to the fullest?

      He certainly didn’t need the money, Apple was his love and his life. I’ll be the first to talk smack about the iZombies, but Steve did what he loved for as long as he possibly could. I could only hope to do the same.

      RIP.

        • albundy
        • 8 years ago

        probably cus i just find it extremely hard to have my live revolve around any company.

          • Corrado
          • 8 years ago

          A lot of people absolutely LOVE what they do, and people that own/run companies love doing it. You think he did much more than come up with ideas and discuss things? He was essentially an inventor more so than a corporate worker.

          • cygnus1
          • 8 years ago

          i think the difference is you’ve never created a company like apple

            • albundy
            • 8 years ago

            that god! i dont wanna be hated for eternity!

            • LaChupacabra
            • 8 years ago

            The irony of this coming from a guy named albundy is palpable

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            Everybody loves Al Bundy.

      • MaxTheLimit
      • 8 years ago

      You are saying he died doing what he was passionate about, and it was a bad thing? He made a lot of lives more convenient. Can’t say I’ve had the widespread impact he did. Lots of people would be happy to be able to touch so many people in their day to day life.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 8 years ago

      You think Jobs represents corporatism? You think he gave a crap about what the investors thought? Do you seriously think that there was anything he would rather do than run Apple?

      • PeterD
      • 8 years ago

      eijh….. “He married his wife Laurene in 1991, and the couple had three children.”

      Moreover:
      “Married in a Buddhist ceremony in 1991 – has three children with his wife and a daughter from a previous relationship”

      • KoolAidMan
      • 8 years ago

      Doing the work that he loved while being with his family was a waste?

      • trackerben
      • 8 years ago

      Yea, those closest to him say he was greatly human, tooled with only so much time, energy, and attention. His personal life was like that of most driven CEOs who give up family and learning to focus on their own talents and mission. But hey, his loss is purposed for the world’s gain.

      [url<]http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/steve-jobs-final-wish-to-get-to-know-his-children-before-it-was-too-late-2367355.html[/url<]

    • TREE
    • 8 years ago

    This is very sad news. Steve Jobs was a very inspiring individual to me. Without a doubt he, and a small number of others, have changed the way we all live, in one way or another.

    Rest in peace Steve…

    • codedivine
    • 8 years ago

    I look at what I have achieved in life (nothing) and what you achieved. Hard to not have respect for a man who achieved so much in just one life. RIP Steve Jobs.

    • kvndoom
    • 8 years ago

    Damn, that sucks. He did to consumer electronics what Bill gates did to personal computers. Love or hate his company, you gotta respect what they have accomplished.

    • Vasilyfav
    • 8 years ago

    I may have been indifferent to your products, but I respected you as a businessman.

    RIP Jobs, your rabid fanboys did not deserve you.

      • crsh1976
      • 8 years ago

      I feel the same, I’m definitely not a die-hard fan of Apple products, but the man certainly fit my definition of a business, design and computing visionary.

    • jpostel
    • 8 years ago

    RIP

    Thanks for all your hard work.

    • thanatos355
    • 8 years ago

    Rest in peace, Steve, and thank you.

    • NeelyCam
    • 8 years ago

    RIP. I thought it was Script Kiddies playing a joke again until I went to [url<]http://www.apple.com[/url<].

    • dashbarron
    • 8 years ago

    No worries, he will rise again in three days.

    RIP Steve.

      • wingless
      • 8 years ago

      Steve Jobs != Jesus Christ, Lord and Savior. Do not blaspheme and do not disrespect the name of our Lord or the name of a man who just died by blaspheming. SHOW SOME CLASS!

        • BoBzeBuilder
        • 8 years ago

        > SHOW SOME CLASS!

        That’s the name of your lord. not our lord. Show some class and go back to your cave.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          whilst i do agree that wingless is overreacting, the comment about telling him to go back to his cave is also a little foolish. You’d be better if you maintained the high ground, rather than getting to be foolish.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            I tried, but thumbdown commandos got me again

            • cygnus1
            • 8 years ago

            damn, -50. he smoked you neelycam

            • lilbuddhaman
            • 8 years ago

            might be a record

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            Nope; my record is -70

            • derFunkenstein
            • 8 years ago

            Well between two comments in this thread alone, he set the bar at -112 (and counting). I’m sure this is a single-topic record.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            That’s probably true – in an AMD-specific article I tend to get a lot of aggregate thumbdown from all my posts, but that -70 was on a shortbread, so I can’t combine scores.

            With this Steve Jobs article he’s bound to get a ton of traffic… I wouldn’t be surprised if he breaks my single-post record tomorrow.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            He did well.

            EDIT: he did [i<]very[/i<] well.

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        Calm down, please.

        • albundy
        • 8 years ago

        iDontCare

        • MaxTheLimit
        • 8 years ago

        Someone needs how to take an affectionate joke. Please get off your high horse, it was meant as a light-hearted comical way of honouring the man.

          • dashbarron
          • 8 years ago

          ^this. Thanks.

        • StuG
        • 8 years ago

        Prove that he wasn’t! ;D Or that the Bible wasn’t conceived by the devil to lead you all off the wrong path. I mean, that is what he would do right…being deceitful and all.

          • trackerben
          • 8 years ago

          Be mindful, you’ve just regurgitated an ancient claim against the provenance of the texts and the performance of the historical audience. The scholarly consensus of western historians is that the provenance of at least one of the two major textual streams is historiographically well-grounded. The phenomenal performance of JC host and analog sociocultures (in particular, Whitehead’s thesis for Science) is intrinsically predictable and was predicted. Chinese historians who seek to understand the unique merits of the West conclude that the full outcomes of the Enlightenment could have only emerged in Hellenic civilization on the strength of its Judeo Christian foundations.

            • 5150
            • 8 years ago

            /silence
            /fart noises

        • Jambe
        • 8 years ago

        Perhaps y’all been trolled. Although this is a Poe’s Law situation if ever there was one…

        • shiznit
        • 8 years ago

        It always amused me that people are actually think their deity is offended by mere words, typed in forum thread no less.

          • Jambe
          • 8 years ago

          It’s great, isn’t it? It’s as if said deity constantly monitors all comments threads.

          [i<]You know, sinner, I just talked with the Jesu, and he told me that he keeps a running tab of all the snide blaspheming you do on message boards. How do you feel knowing that one day your behavior will come back to haunt you, huh?[/i<] What rot! It's such hilarious Cro-Magnon-tier nonsense!

        • ronch
        • 8 years ago

        I bet you believe Harold Camping.

        • trackerben
        • 8 years ago

        You’re either trolling or making a very sharp point, on good faith I’ll grant you the latter. But from the responses here your expectations appear far off. Most people are too classically illiterate to see the cognates behind such gestures, sadly.

          • Anonymous Coward
          • 8 years ago

          I’m curious what “sharp point” is might have made.

            • trackerben
            • 8 years ago

            He is alleging disrespect vs. the majority faith on its foremost claim, and vs. the fell reputation of deceased. Scoffers, mockers, scorners, and sundry disbelievers of the JC deity are never written about nicely in any Abrahamic literature. Such humor would likely displease studied Christians if not delivered with some sensitivity, especially during the death of someone as well-regarded as Mr. Jobs. Who normally wouldn’t have invited such comparisons, and neither would those close to him, I should think.

            And yet, this is no forum of biblically or even classically-educated literates, and should we always behave as if those we eff about are nearby and listening?. This only applies to those who think an ever-present mediator is recording our every saying and intent for later reckoning. I wonder about calls for higher standards of discourse when all that is publicly expected these decadent days is the basest level of decorum in the Judeo-Christian tradition.

            Thing is, that schtick is funny if one remembers the “Terminator Jesus” youtube, where time-traveling Arnold said of Jesus on his way to the cross, “He’ll be back.”

            • Anonymous Coward
            • 8 years ago

            You haven’t successfully communicated with me.

            • trackerben
            • 8 years ago

            How so? I can be dense in my writing. Or is it that you’re not too familiar with Judeo-Christian teachings?

            I tried to explain that, if sincere, such a call to stop mocking basic tenets of christianity is in keeping with cultural mourning customs. Historically, such disarming wit was common between ancient cosmopolitans who liked to trivialize the radical beliefs of these newly proselytyzing Jews.

            • kamikaziechameleon
            • 8 years ago

            “Thing is, that schtick is funny if one remembers the “Terminator Jesus” youtube, where time-traveling Arnold said of Jesus on his way to the cross, “He’ll be back.””

            LFMAO!

        • Arclight
        • 8 years ago

        Extremist, are we? People like you need to be put down.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 8 years ago

        Do you live in the western world?

        • Kaleid
        • 8 years ago

        Screw Jesus.

        • PeterD
        • 8 years ago

        Steve Jobs was a Buddhist. Buddhist believe in reincarnation.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          SOME Buddhists believe in Reincarnation.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        While you don’t like it (and sometimes it drives me nuts), the Bible is OUR rules for life, not the non-believer. Why would they do anything biblically if they didn’t believe it in the first place? You can’t hold others to your own standards and freaking out like this isn’t going to help.

        • Meadows
        • 8 years ago

        That’s the biggest minus I’ve ever seen happen.

      • ronch
      • 8 years ago

      Careful, man. This comment could be taken as a joke by those who could take it. But you know, there are some people who get riled up real quick. I’m the former. Just be careful.

      • mduncan62
      • 8 years ago

      Jobs was a Nihilist.

    • ante9383
    • 8 years ago

    Rest in peace, Steve. Thank you for your many contributions to technology, entertainment, and society as a whole. No one will ever be able to replace you. Goodbye.

    • bthylafh
    • 8 years ago

    And yea verily, did he ascend to heaven on a cloud of RDF.

    • RickyTick
    • 8 years ago

    iCondolences

      • wingless
      • 8 years ago

      You fail as a human being. Hit the edit button and apologize. I’m no fan of Apple or the iPhone. Hell, I even made fun of the iPhone 4S like a motherfugga yesterday, BUT HAVE A LITTLE CLASS MAN!

        • RickyTick
        • 8 years ago

        WHAT! It’s a tribute to him. I didn’t say iGoodriddance. For crying out loud, condolences means “in sympathy”.

          • cygnus1
          • 8 years ago

          i don’t think it’s a failure as a human being, and i can see it as a humorous tribute. but it’s definitely a little soon for anything comical to not be labeled as bad taste

          • ronch
          • 8 years ago

          Wingless has been trolling this topic, saying HAVE SOME CLASS MAN! all the time.

          Yeah right. Look who’s talking.

        • cegras
        • 8 years ago

        Stop overreacting.

        • jalex3
        • 8 years ago

        uMAD? Anyway sad news, as any death is… rip Steve.

        • rxc6
        • 8 years ago

        Seeing your replies here I recommend that you go to a doctor. Somebody should take a look at that stick up your @$$.

        • Arclight
        • 8 years ago

        whoooosh

        • Wirko
        • 8 years ago

        Do you feel that inventing new words as i + capitalized word is sarcastic at this time? So do I but I’m not giving RickyTick a -1 (or a +1, either).

        • ronch
        • 8 years ago

        Just a few more thumb downs and you’ll be crowned the new king! (Of thumb downs, that is.)

        HAVE SOME CLASS, MAN!!!

      • FireGryphon
      • 8 years ago

      Perfect way to memorialize him in a comedic but appropriate way. Clever. I’m sure he’d like it. πŸ™‚

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        ^This.

        • RickyTick
        • 8 years ago

        Perfect interpretation.

      • BoBzeBuilder
      • 8 years ago

      Sorry but I lol’d.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 8 years ago

      Insanely great.

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        THAT’S WHAT SHE SAID… TO ME!!!
        about the movie i just downloaded.

          • NeelyCam
          • 8 years ago

          Try streaming. Instant gratification.

            • dpaus
            • 8 years ago

            [quote<]Try streaming[/quote<] Kinky...

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            sounds illegal.

            • NeelyCam
            • 8 years ago

            Neither streaming nor ‘kinky’ is illegal.

      • hiro_pro
      • 8 years ago

      i think steve jobs would have like the post

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      +64 is very impressive. *bows*

        • RickyTick
        • 8 years ago

        After 5 minutes of posting it was -5. I just thought it was a clever way of saying how sorry I was to hear of his death. Thanks for the ‘ups’.

    • thermistor
    • 8 years ago

    How we perceive “personal” computing devices has been radically altered by Steve Jobs. It’s hard to estimate how different computing could have been without Mr. Jobs’ influence at Apple Computer.

    Good thoughts and condolences to his family, friends, and associates.

    • tanker27
    • 8 years ago

    πŸ™

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