Report: Sandy Bridge-E to ship with liquid cooler

Building a top-of-the-line PC? By the time Intel’s Sandy Bridge-E chips roll out, you may have to think twice about getting a fancy aftermarket cooler. X-bit labs reports that retail-boxed Sandy Bridge-E CPUs will ship with a closed-loop liquid cooler from Asetek.

The cooler, pictured in the X-bit labs piece, includes a copper cold plate and a radiator with a blue 120-mm fan strapped onto it. A curved plastic shroud surrounds the fan, giving the contraption a little extra visual flair. More important, the combination of a copper cold plate, a meaty radiator, and a 120-mm fan ought to guarantee some measure of quiet—something not all stock coolers pull off, especially with power-hungry processors.

If we’re to believe the latest whispers from the rumor mill, Intel is going to release Sandy Bridge-E on November 14. The processor will require new motherboards with LGA2011 sockets and quad memory channels. X-bit labs says the flagship Sandy Bridge-E model will have six cores, 12 threads, a top Turbo speed of 3.9GHz, 12MB of L3 cache, and a 130W thermal envelope.

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    • xiaomim
    • 8 years ago
    • R2P2
    • 8 years ago

    This is just marketing. Nehalem i7s had a 130W TDP and came with air coolers.

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    I suspect that water cooler is meant for the Extreme Edition chips.

    The lesser Sandy-Bridge Es will have large HSFs.

    • ronch
    • 8 years ago

    It’s a bit scary that liquid cooling would start to get bundled with CPUs, even if it’ll be just for the enthusiast-oriented SKUs for now. Remember the time when your i386 didn’t even require a heatsink? Later on the idea of using a fan/heatsink to cool the beast became so common that it’s completely acceptable now. Required, in fact. I hope that this doesn’t mean >140W TDPs are inevitable and we’d need to resort to liquid cooling. I’d be happy if CPUs stayed at 65W – 125W.

      • Airmantharp
      • 8 years ago

      I wonder what my 2500k is putting out at 4.8GHz… underneath it’s closed loop liquid cooler.

        • Draphius
        • 8 years ago

        Sandybridge dont seem to get very warm, ive played around with a few different air cooling and closed loops systems with my 2500K and they all perform almost the exact same with a slight increase in temp in the closed loop systems after an hour long loading. they honestly dont get very hot

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 8 years ago

      So buy the 65 watt versions of the chips instead of the Extreme Editions.

        • ronch
        • 8 years ago

        I’m talking about where the industry may be headed. Right now desktop parts range from 45w – 140w. If liquid cooling becomes the norm the acceptable TDPs may exceed 140w. And who knows, 65w CPUs may even go extinct.

          • Beelzebubba9
          • 8 years ago

          Haswell is looking to drive Intel’s mainstream CPUs into the 10W range, so I suspect your fears are quite unfounded. Almost every move by the industry in the last half decade has been chasing performance per watt, and I don’t see that reversing.

          That said, there’s always a market for high end performance, and these 130W chips are nothing new. IIRC, Smithfield topped out at 150W/socket and Apple shipped liquid coolers with the last generation G5 Power Macs. Chips like these are the total outliers and won’t ever represent the bulk of the market or R&D.

    • sweatshopking
    • 8 years ago

    why are we so excited about this chip? More cored sandy? with oc’ing potential? ANOTHER intel mobo? really? why……….? i understand that we like quad channel memory, but, guys.. come on………..

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      If you don’t know why you need it, you don’t need it.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 8 years ago

        I think that type of argument is often used to hide the lack of any need.

          • SPOOFE
          • 8 years ago

          … Or it’s a result of the need becoming further and further from the mainstream. But anyone that does any heavy work with photos, video, rendering, or audio can certainly present a valid case for needing every iota of processing power they can get.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 8 years ago

      I’d get one if I where about 5 years younger. I would need it [i<]because it was there[/i<].

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      It is a workstation/server chip geared towards prosumers.

      If you are gaming or doing mainstream related tasks. Just get the regular Sandy Bridge or wait for Ivy Bridge to come out.

      It still doesn’t stop epenis types from spending ton dollar to get top scores in Epenismark2012.

      • flip-mode
      • 8 years ago

      It’s only legit reason for existence seems to be if you need massive amounts of memory and memory bandwidth. I imagine that Intel could endow the 1155 platform with all the other features (core count, PCIe 3, SAS) without much difficulty. But you get a +1 from me just because it’s a fair question.

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        Thanks BFF ♥

      • RAMBO
      • 8 years ago

      I thought it was because of the new architecture Intel did, the transistors.

      • ronch
      • 8 years ago

      No, I’m not excited about this chip. I’m excited about Bulldozer. I wanna see how it will do against SB, IB, and this, and how AMD continues to fare against Intel.

    • juampa_valve_rde
    • 8 years ago

    SB-E is an excuse for a new platform, offering a liquid cooler from the start smells like a marketing trick, as the platform is broken from the very beginning in his coolest features (sas, pcie 3). I think the people who need workstation class hardware is fine with the SB 2600 or ye olde 980X, probably the platform will get polished later with an ivy bridge chip and a fixed south bridge, but until then… it doesnt feel interesting.

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      Sandy Bridge-E is worth it for those who use their systems for real work.

      Time is $$$$$. Having more cores is always welcomed for servers and workstations.

      Sandy Bridge-E is going to leap-frog the regular Sandy Bridge chips at prosumer related tasks.

    • Duck
    • 8 years ago

    The best tower coolers are cheaper and easily outperform these closed loop watercooler for low noise setups.

      • internetsandman
      • 8 years ago

      But they aren’t nearly as compatible with most of the lower end or otherwise smaller cases on the market. A 120mm fan slot is an almost universal attribute for computer cases, space for something like an NH-D14 on the other hand, is not.

        • Duck
        • 8 years ago

        Intel don’t care about compatibility. If they did, they wouldn’t make arbitrary changes to the heatsink mounting hole configuration for new sockets (amongst other things).

        Besides, there are other tower coolers that don’t overhang the motherboard and will fit just fine.

    • Clint Torres
    • 8 years ago

    Something tells me this CPU is gonna be pricey…just a guess.

      • 5150
      • 8 years ago

      Are you friends with Wellen Dowd?

        • Clint Torres
        • 8 years ago

        Oh yes, and with Phil McCracken as well…

      • Clint Torres
      • 8 years ago

      …not to mention Dixie Normus

    • Spyder22446688
    • 8 years ago

    After seeing how well the Corsair closed-loop coolers work, this sounds pretty cool. Then again, considering how cool the Sandy Bridge chips run, one has to wonder whether this is really necessary.

      • ALiLPinkMonster
      • 8 years ago

      130W is a pretty big jump from SB’s current 95W. Not to mention the overclocking capabilities this thing will no doubt have.

      • [+Duracell-]
      • 8 years ago

      Take in mind this processor is aimed at the enthusiast/overclocking crowd, and the top model TDP will be 130w. It probably won’t run cool at high loads.

        • Spyder22446688
        • 8 years ago

        I’m just saying it seems quite a drastic jump from Intel’s current stock heatsink, which is little more than a fan and some aluminum foil bunched together. Still, pretty cool.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 8 years ago

      One of my Corsair Hydro H70s experienced a pump failure. I replaced it with a CoolerMaster Hyper 212 Plus for a fraction of the cost of the H70.

      I’m tired of dealing with Corsair’s RMA department.

        • just brew it!
        • 8 years ago

        Love the Hyper 212 too… the sleeve bearing fan concerns me slightly though.

          • A_Pickle
          • 8 years ago

          …but it takes a standard 120mm fan, so that’s an easy fix. I purchased a Xigmatek HDT-S1284 heatsink for my Phenom II X6, and I’m happy with it. It runs mighty cool, and I replaced the stock Xigmatek fan with a nice Scythe S-FLEX SFF21E. I have five of those fans in my case, but you can’t hear a damn thing.

          I don’t imagine that I’ll be buying anything but CPU heatsink/fan assemblies that require proprietary, non-standard fans. I mean, I just don’t see the point — the heatsink itself is not likely to fail. The moving part, AKA the “fan?” That will fail someday.

        • Draphius
        • 8 years ago

        really i just had a fantastic experience with corsairs rma dept. replaced my entire 600t case because of a faulty fan controller and i had it on my doorstep within a week of contacting them

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 8 years ago

      I have a closed loop cooler and it works really well. It costs about the same as my old air cooler and is completely silent.

        • chuckula
        • 8 years ago

        Could you tell us which model it is? (I’m interested in doing this at some point)

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