Adobe demos awesome blur removal

Turning blurry photos into crystal-clear images has been a staple of bad TV shows for years, but thanks to Adobe, it may soon become reality. As PC World reports, the company demonstrated a rather awe-inspiring motion blur correction technology at the Adobe MAX 2011 conference last week. One attendee grabbed this video of the demonstration:

All of a sudden, I find myself itching to upgrade to the next version of Photoshop—though based on what was said during the presentation, Adobe hasn’t yet confirmed when the blur removal technology will appear in its graphics editing software. Either way, this technology should make everything from trade show photography to salvaging bad phone camera shots much easier.

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    • xiaomim
    • 8 years ago
      • Meadows
      • 8 years ago

      What is this crap.

        • Bonusbartus
        • 8 years ago

        I think it is called “Spam”

    • kalizec
    • 8 years ago

    The video doesn’t work…

    “This video is private.”

      • way2strong
      • 8 years ago

      [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxjiQoTp864[/url<]

    • can-a-tuna
    • 8 years ago

    And I thought they’re gonna remove MOTOBLUR ™…

    • willyolio
    • 8 years ago

    this youtube quality video was entirely too blurry for me to notice any difference… all i can do is rely on the crowd’s reaction to know that there was a difference.

    • ryko
    • 8 years ago

    anybody else notice the cool holodeck like wall in that video when the demo finishes? how is the demo being projected into thin air like that? or has it been added in after the fact? everybody in the audience seems to be reacting in real-time…

      • The Dark One
      • 8 years ago

      They often do that at the ‘true’ Imax screens. The surface is actually riddled with small holes so that they can put their speakers behind it. Turn on a few backlights when you’re not presenting anything and the screen seems to disappear.

      • krazyredboy
      • 8 years ago

      Actually, it is simply, a large, elongated screen. Using 3 (sometimes less, sometimes more, depending on the request) stacks of projectors, synced together, they make a super wide image display. This can be done in rear projection or front (Front, giving the best brightness and contrast) and linked together using either a multi-monitor setup from a computer or software from the projectors themselves (Cristie Projectors have their own software built in, for this).

      This is actually, something that I deal with, quite often, as I work in the A/V field, doing these types of setups, all of the time.

      In their case, they used a background image, to give the holodeck feel and simply moved their sources around the screen, like moving a window on your desktop.

    • sweatshopking
    • 8 years ago

    that looks cool. Too bad everyone knows adobe is crap. At least thats what my mac using friends tell me…

    • valrandir
    • 8 years ago

    Yawn. Astronomers have been doing this for years.

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      Not on their home PC, they haven’t.

        • Lianna
        • 8 years ago

        Yes, on their home PC, they have. A few free and a few commercial software does this. Admittedly though, it’s much simpler in astronomical case, because (almost) any non-blown star gives (almost) ready point spread function. The software for general (but somewhat defined, like in Adobe’s demo) case of blur was used in scientific circles for scientific imaging for, like, fifteen years (plus). That’s when I was using it, on my home PC.

          • dpaus
          • 8 years ago

          I know; I actually used one to sharpen a security camera image to the point where I could read a license plate. Can’t remember which freeware it was; it was for Linux, and took all night to run on an Athlon 4300 (?)

      • willmore
      • 8 years ago

      Are they correcting for shake or for lens aberations?

    • MethylONE
    • 8 years ago

    Not a big deal. CSI Miami has been using this technology for years already.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 8 years ago

      Yes, we know. It said that in the first sentence.

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      The CSI Miami technology is actually far superior: it’s able to take a 16-pixel by 16-pixel segment reflection in Hoaratio’s sunglasses captured by his webcam and ‘sharpen’ it into a 2K by 2K true-colour portrait of the killer – in about 8 seconds on a run-of-the-mill Dell desktop. beat [i<]that[/i<], Adobe.

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      Nevermind – TravelMug beat me to it.

    • Goty
    • 8 years ago

    From his brief description, I can think of a relatively simple schematic way of handling this problem; I’m sure there are some finer details that make the problem more difficult, but I’m surprised that nobody had approached it in this manner before.

      • sschaem
      • 8 years ago

      lots of research paper on this subject… The trick is to make the method of choice rock solid.

      Same thing with Content aware fill and scale. Adobe I think had the first solid version people could use in production software.

    • StefanVonS
    • 8 years ago

    Now, how about camera shake 🙂

      • willmore
      • 8 years ago

      Seems like it could be. The general case of deblurring is very difficult/impossible, but it looks like this one is assuming a camera shake type of blurring (not a lens aberation/target object movement) which is a much simpler subset of the larger problem.

      Basically, it looks likey they estimate the trajectory of the camera shake. For video, you would have the start vector from the end vector of the previous frame, so that should make it a little easier. I’m very curious to see where this leads.

      You could end up with a nice analysis of how each camera holder shakes and maybe even learn to identify specific videographers from their characteristic shake pattern. Quick, someone pattent that.

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        Whoosh.

          • StefanVonS
          • 8 years ago

          lol, right?

    • TravelMug
    • 8 years ago

    Enhance!!!

      • ew
      • 8 years ago

      Zoom!!!

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