Ubuntu 11.10 ‘Oneiric Ocelot’ hits the web

Sick of the hubbub about iOS 5? Here’s a new operating system launch that might be more up your alley. Canonical put up version 11.10 of its Ubuntu Linux distribution earlier today, and you can grab it now from the Ubuntu website in a variety of formats—from live USB stick to Windows installer, for those not ready to commit to a full OS switch yet.

Highlights of this release include new versions of Compiz and Unity, a revamped Ubuntu Software center, Mozilla’s Thunderbird e-mail client (which replaces Evolution), some fresh fonts, and a built-in version of OneConf, which "[keeps] your installed applications in sync between multiple computers." The end result looks pretty slick and polished, at least judging by the video below:

For more details on Ubuntu 11.10, you can peruse the full release notes on the official Ubuntu Wiki. Folks running Ubuntu 11.04 can follow the instructions here to upgrade their installations.

Comments closed
    • vikramsbox
    • 8 years ago

    I’ve been using Linux Mint for the last 2 years after switching from Ubuntu. Apart from the interface, I guess that they are more or less the same. Going through the comments, I feel that the major issues with adoption is the feeling that getting Ubuntu (or Linux in general) to work is still a matter of commands in the terminal, and of course the usability and cross compatibility with Windows.
    My main observations were as follows-
    [list=1<] [*<] The major issue, even in general usage, is drivers. Ubuntu works out of the box, and configures chipsets and wifi without any need for a MoBo CD. But the drivers are sometimes too general and it is then that it becomes frustrating. v 10.10 onwards, multi monitor setup on intel chips is buggy. And as drivers are included in the monolithic kernel, I can't move back as 10.04 won't work with the newer hardware. It treats my touchpad as a PS/2 mouse and I can't automatically disable it with the Disable Touchpad application. Thing is if it works, it works splendidly, if not, then wait for them to fix it in their own sweet time. [/*<][*<] I've done some customization and I haven't had to use the CLI too often. Ubuntu allows you to open the file as Administrator. So you just have to find out the file that needs to be edited and make a change just like you edit a normal file. Commands for everything are available on the net and its just copy-paste. I've enforced PCIE_ASPM=enfore in Grub and configured the files in Laptop-mode-tools to reduce the power usage, all without much ado. [/*<][*<] Office software compatibility is a major issue. I can't blame the OSS community as its not their fault that MS uses their own frmatting standards. But still, everyone uses MS Office, so cross compatibility is a must. And after the time lost during the changeover from OpenOffice to LibreOffice (about 6-12 months), the gap is still there. [/*<] [/list<] Its not that Windows is all clear. Tweakers have to twiddle with system files and the registry there too. People don't comlain as they have bought Windows at a hefty price, and the attitude "Windows must be right" doesn't help. I've seen people accept MS Software bugs meekly, while give the thumbs down to OSS for minor glitches. All I know is, for all tasks I've given it, Linux runs circles around Windows in performance, looks decently attractive, has all the popular software and gives competitive battery life (after some tweaks, which you have to do in Windows also) and allows me to configure the system in a way Windows never can. And its legally free. I'm hooked.

    • elmopuddy
    • 8 years ago

    I’m running Kubuntu 11.10 now, pretty nice, although all the fonts look like ass.. gotta get that fixed, its quite annoying. Also need to find something close to iTunes.

    Took 2 installs to get it right, first time I made mistake of adding repositories, second time left all alone, was able to install all the software I needed.

    • ronch
    • 8 years ago

    Is Gnome3 the desktop environment shown in the video? Is it the default DE when you download 11.10?

      • kc77
      • 8 years ago

      Nope. That’s Unity. “sudo apt-get install gnome-shell” will install it. Then you select “Gnome” on the login screen for the DE environment.

    • jcw122
    • 8 years ago

    I remember the first time I thought I was using Linux…

    • ronch
    • 8 years ago

    I’ve stuck with Ubuntu 10.04. I would take a look at each successive release but there’s just nothing really worthwhile that would make me upgrade. Unity isn’t really pretty either.

      • joselillo_25
      • 8 years ago

      Please install 11.10 and gnome3, the experience is amazing. This is the best thing I have tried in a PC in a lot of time. And I am a pro windows guy.

        • ronch
        • 8 years ago

        Thanks. I’ll check it out.

      • helix
      • 8 years ago

      I’ve also kept 10.04 on my main machine at home.
      Unity in 11.04 was stable, but a regression in productivity (as compared to gnome2).
      Unity in 11.10 is good enough to make me feel tempted to upgrade. I hope I can resist until the 12.04 LTS.

    • indeego
    • 8 years ago

    Man the LiveCD really really has come a long way. Boot to desktop in 20 seconds?

    Liking what I’m seeing.

    I’ll probably use it until some wireless device stops working randomly or it screws up during sleep mode, like every other time I’ve given Ubuntu a try at home.

      • provoko
      • 8 years ago

      Wow, 20 seconds? I still have been using ubuntu 8 live cd since all the others load sooooo long. But if 11.10 boots in 20 seconds, it’s time I replace that cd. =)

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        Yeah and that was on an old core2duo system I have lying around, it’s at least 3.5 years old.

    • pedro
    • 8 years ago

    The ‘buntus make excellent file servers/heavy-lifters-over-ssh, that’s for sure. I also put my mum on Ubuntu years ago because it’s a perfect web browsing OS with far fewer tech support calls coming in.

    These days I’m rolling with Xubuntu because Unity/Gnome 3 just isn’t doing it for me. It seems uncannily similar in execution to the KDE4 release, only worse.

    I have no desire to jump on the 11.10 boat. 12.04 maybe because of the LTS. But you get to a point of diminishing/negative returns I find. There’s nothing in 11.10 that particularly draws me in and some stuff that drives me away.

    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    You know from a Windows user Linux is starting to look more and more desirable or maybe windows is becoming less and less desirable, maybe both? Anyway, I would switch OS’s if only Linux supported gaming nearly as well as Windows. The horror stories I’ve heard about Wine has pretty much stifled any desire to switch to Linux. My friend who is a hardcore Nix guy ended up duel booting rather then putting up with the crashes, hangs, and ultra crappy frame rates in Wine (if the game even works at all).

      • Chrispy_
      • 8 years ago

      It’s windows becoming less desirable.

      Even new version of windows adds gimmicks we don’t need and obscures/hides/retires powerful features we absolutely cannot work without. Windows may be getting more capable as time goes on, but it’s also fast becoming unusable, and at some point the increased capability won’t be worth the sacrifices in usability. For a lot of people, this point was reached when Vista was launched.

      • End User
      • 8 years ago

      Build a second system. I migrate my gaming rig parts to my Linux rig every few years.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 8 years ago

      There’s always Cedega or CrossOver, plus you pretty much have to go with nvidia if you want to game on linux.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 8 years ago

        Those are just implementations of wine.

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 8 years ago

          They are and they aren’t.

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 8 years ago

    Still like Mandriva the best, then debian. If I was really serious about linux, I’d probably go debian. Mandriva is great for messing around. IMO, easiest to set up and do stuff. Haven’t really tried anything recent though, so this new Ubuntu could be a good candidate for testing out. Just don’t have a good enough excuse to waste time on it yet. Maybe I’ll start messing with it around win8’s release, do some comparative shopping.

    • joselillo_25
    • 8 years ago

    Is possible to use gnome 3 in this Ubuntu release? without excessive hacking

      • BlackStar
      • 8 years ago

      Yes.

      “sudo apt-get install gnome-shell” and you are set. Unity is now based on Gnome 3, so it works perfectly alongside Gnome Shell.

        • joselillo_25
        • 8 years ago

        Thank you, it works.

        This is the best PC OS I have tried, is beautiful and so productive if you do not need windows only apps. And I think Gnome3 could work very good in touchscreens devices because of the big buttons they use in this version.

        I think Linux developers have been very smart this time with this release and they have pass win7 which is also a great OS

      • Blazex
      • 8 years ago

      gnome-shell is now available in the software center, which far as my older laptop goes, unity and software center were sluggish compared to gnome-shell and synaptic(which you might wanna install anyways)

        • kc77
        • 8 years ago

        I would second this. It’s surprising how quickly Gnome-Shell has become so stable. It’s quicker than Unity and doesn’t take up nearly as much screen real estate.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 8 years ago

    when does “lusty lohan”, “jumping jesus” , “frail fail” or “whitey whitebread” come out? only then will teh l00nix be ready for the desktop.

    Think Different..

    • CuttinHobo
    • 8 years ago

    I think “Ornery Ocelot” would have been a better codename.

    How long until Microsoft gives in to the peer-pressure and starts code-naming Windows after wild cats? Or perhaps they’ll one-up the competition by naming the next version “Honey Badger”. But that would be like bringing a minigun to a knife fight!

    • elmopuddy
    • 8 years ago

    You can disable Unity theme I think… I’m going to try this out soon.

      • provoko
      • 8 years ago

      gnome 3 is now included =)

        • elmopuddy
        • 8 years ago

        I can’t stand Unity lol, just tried the latest release.. now I’m messing with Kubuntu in a vm..

    • Ashbringer
    • 8 years ago

    If only this could play my Windows games without a problem, I’d make the switch. Too bad Wine sucks beyond with Direct 3D based games. Only OpenGL games run fast and fine, and those are too few.

      • Deanjo
      • 8 years ago

      Well I have to disagree. Heck I can even get equal framerates in Crysis 2 in wine and Win 7. This if of course on a different distro.

        • Ashbringer
        • 8 years ago

        What distro? I want it!

    • swaaye
    • 8 years ago

    That launcher is just not for me.

      • srg86
      • 8 years ago

      Then I’d highly recommend either Kubuntu or Xubuntu. I use Kubuntu myself.

    • JMccovery
    • 8 years ago

    I’m updating my Ubuntu 11.04 VM, the update server must be hammered right now, haven’t seen a d/l speed greater than 75KB/s (600kbps).

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    I used Ubuntu a couple of times in college and it truly is a great OS. Software support is the only thing holding it back, no games, no compatibility with my modelling software, no go. General stability and GUI makes it my favorite OS. Just wish I could do more with it without being a commandline jokey.

    If It could play DX games better I’d have it on my machine right NOW.

      • codedivine
      • 8 years ago

      you can try dual-booting. Or try it in virtualbox.

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 8 years ago

        done that but I’m not inclined to restart my computer just to switch tasks. It was fun but now I’m short on time so every minute counts.

      • Game_boy
      • 8 years ago

      Default GUI has been ruined, replaced with some “cool” launcher thing that gets in the way.

        • crabjokeman
        • 8 years ago

        Gnome 2 is gone with this release. You can always use another DE like xfce or gnome3-fallback, which looks/behaves a lot more like the old Gnome.

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 8 years ago

        I’m sure that with a few moments time you could retool the GUI to your liking.

      • Umbragen
      • 8 years ago

      Yeah, it’s my favorite OS too, to bad it’s completely useless.

        • just brew it!
        • 8 years ago

        1. How can it be your favorite OS if you think it is completely useless?

        2. If it in fact *is* completely useless to you, then run Windows, and load Ubuntu in a VM (or dual-boot) if you still want to play.

        FWIW I run Ubuntu as my primary OS both at home and work. But I don’t game, and I do have a Windows VM at work for checking my e-mail (corporate e-mail server is Exchange, so Outlook is the path of least pain) and running Word/Excel/Powerpoint (LibreOffice will open MS Office files, but if you’re ping-ponging files back and forth with someone else who is using MS Office it is still sub-optimal).

        However, I’m a software developer; so my use case is not typical.

          • kamikaziechameleon
          • 8 years ago

          IF I graded OS’s purely on their own merits Ubuntu wins outright against all other platforms but when you consider 3rd party support it becomes apparent that Ubuntu has not been commercially pushed in the US like microsoft and apple products.

            • just brew it!
            • 8 years ago

            Don’t get me wrong, I absolutely *love* Ubuntu, and it is currently my OS of choice. However…

            – The ability to run the applications you need really must factor into the grade. People don’t run OSes for their own sake; they run an OS in order to run applications on top of it. My PC usage is such that Ubuntu does nearly everything I need, and the stuff I need that it *doesn’t* do well runs fine in a VM. Not everyone is so lucky.

            – IMO the 6-month release cycle is problematic. Sometimes half-baked stuff gets released just to meet the release timetable. If you try to stay current, you are upgrading every 6 months and effectively running a rolling beta; OTOH if you try to stick with one version your security patches end after only 18 months (unless it is an LTS release). Run the LTS release to get the extended patch support and after a year or two you’ll find that newer versions of certain apps aren’t compatible.

          • Umbragen
          • 8 years ago

          It’s appeal is completely aesthetic. Unfortunately, if I want to actually do something, short of web surfing, I have to load Windows.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            Yup, that seems to be the woes of nix in general outside of running servers.

            • just brew it!
            • 8 years ago

            Hey… it does fine as a desktop OS for me (both home and work). But I don’t game any more, and do occasionally need to jump over to a Windows VM for stuff that just can’t be done effectively in Linux (this mostly at work… at home I spend 99% of my time at the computer in Linux).

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 8 years ago

        ^^^This, Its my notion if programs where platform agnostic I’d pick Ubuntu every time. Ubuntu is my favorite win 7 is my second favorite, 3rd is the most current mac OS.

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 8 years ago

    Nice tips for tweaking can be found at [url<]http://www.webupd8.org/2011/10/things-to-tweak-after-installing-ubuntu.html[/url<]

      • End User
      • 8 years ago

      Thanks for the link!

    • dpaus
    • 8 years ago

    [XtremeSarcasm][i<]Still[/i<] no dumbed-down touchscreen interface! Epic fail.... [/XtremeSarcasm] EDIT: tags added for the terminally obtuse

      • Arclight
      • 8 years ago

      Yo dawg i heard you like sarcasm so i said:

      [quote<]Still no dumbed-down touchscreen interface! Epic fail.... [/quote<] Was that a sarcastic comment?

    • codedivine
    • 8 years ago

    I am more of a Kubuntu person and of course Kubuntu 11.10 is out as well 🙂

      • HunterZ
      • 8 years ago

      Xubuntu for me, updating both of my boxes tonight probably 🙂

      • DougG
      • 8 years ago

      Agreed.

      I’m always surprised that Gnome is more popular than KDE. KDE aims to be more configurable and tweakable, while Gnome aims for the Apple-esque few-options simplicity thing. So KDE aims for power users, while Gnome aims for grandma.

      If I were to characterize Linux users in general, I’d definitely say power users / experimenters, and would expect KDE to reign.

        • just brew it!
        • 8 years ago

        I think KDE lost quite a bit of momentum when KDE 4.0 was released. It was half-baked enough to cause a lot of people to jump ship to GNOME. I guess the kinks have been worked out of KDE 4 now… maybe I should give it another chance (especially now that GNOME users are getting pushed to adopt the somewhat half-baked GNOME 3.x)…

        • bthylafh
        • 8 years ago

        I like Gnome 2 because it usually gets out of my way and lets me work, while for my purposes KDE has to be configured before I’m OK with its quirks.

        Prior to settling on Gnome 2 I used the terminal (with lynx and elinks for browsing, ogg123 for playing music, slrn for Usenet, &c) for many years and still do on occasion. The console environment also stays the hell out of my way for the most part.

        • BlackStar
        • 8 years ago

        KDE feels as if it is being developed by hundreds of people with differing views on usability and UI design. Scratch that, KDE is developed by hundreds of people with differing views, and it shows. Every application has slightly different keyboard shortcuts (e.g. Ctrl+M is completely random), and the taskbar, application launcher and dolphin are themed and animated completely different.

        KDE looks awesome in screenshots but sit and use it for a few days and it’s maddening. Plus, it has some serious performance issues on my E-350, which is why I stopped using it in the end.

        I really liked how I could configure it to make use of my whole screen (no unnecessary panels ala Gnome) and I loved the power-user features (e.g. different compositor configs per window), but for all the performance work it still was appreciably slower than both Unity and Gnome Shell, plus quite a bit more buggy to boot. Which is a pity, because there were things that I really liked.

          • kc77
          • 8 years ago

          Thank you I thought it was just me. I’ve tried it multiples of times. Every time I work with it I last about a week. The main reason for my disdain with KDE is because of all of the bugs and a Control Panel that’s a disaster area. It’s great to have tons of options, but when you have so many or they are strewn about in such a lackadaisical fashion, it’s almost better not to have them.

          • helix
          • 8 years ago

          Sometimes it feels like KDE grows like a snowball.
          “Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.”
          No DE is perfect. (No program is perfect.) There is always more features you can add. But you need to think just as much about what you can take away.

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