3D Vision 2 brings bigger goggles, brighter visuals

Nvidia is sprucing up its stereoscopic 3D offering—and display makers are taking part. The company has announced 3D Vision 2, which involves both a new set of active-shutter 3D glasses and 3D LightBoost, a display technology meant to enable brighter visuals by letting more light seep in through the goggles.

The new 3D Vision 2 glasses have 20% larger lenses than the original design, and they feature a thinner, more flexible composite frame that’s meant to block more light from the sides and top. Wearing headphones over these should be more comfortable, the company says. We’re told battery life is “very similar,” as well, and prices haven’t budged: you’re still expected to shell out $149 for a 3D Vision Wireless Kit with a receiver, or $99 for the glasses alone without the receiver.

You’ll find the 3D LightBoost sticker on certain new displays and laptops. What does it mean? Simply put, the LCD panel has a faster backlight that allows the 3D glasses to be kept open longer. (Remember, 3D Vision goggles work by rapidly opening and closing shutters so the user’s left and right eyes always see different frames.) 3D LightBoost brightens up not just the images on the screen, but also the user’s surroundings—so tracking down function keys on your keyboard or reaching for that can of Bawls should be less error-prone.

Among the first 3D LightBoost displays are the Asus VG278H (pictured above), a 27″ panel with a 1920×1080 resolution, dual-link DVI and HDMI 1.4 inputs, and bundled 3D Vision 2 glasses. Other monitors to support LightBoost include the HN274HB from Acer as well as the XL2420T and XL2420TX from BenQ. LightBoost is even making an appearance in notebooks—specifically, Toshiba’s Qosmio X770/X775 and Satellite P770/P775.

Those laptops ship with first-generation 3D Vision goggles, but that’s okay. Nvidia says the first-gen glasses will support LightBoost after a driver update, provided you’re using them with the right display. Conversely, 3D Vision 2 goggles can be used with non-LightBoost panels. All of that equipment usually doesn’t come cheap, so it’s nice to see Nvidia affording users some flexibility there.

Look for 3D Vision 2 products in stores some this month.

Comments closed
    • DarkUltra
    • 8 years ago

    XL2420T? Maybe that model will improve the shortcomings of the XL2410T? Colors were horribly off, and calibration didn’t help that much. The black levels where poor so shadow detail in games and movies where crushed. White instead of RGB LED backlight. Though it did have zero input lag.

    [url<]http://www.flatpanelshd.com/review.php?subaction=showfull&id=1291718728[/url<] The best 23"-23,6" 120Hz monitor is still the LG W2363D. It combines zero input lag, good black levels and excellent calibration results with a CCFL backlight for full-color whites.

    • Grape Flavor
    • 8 years ago

    This is a good step, but when are these displays going to start offering better quality and higher resolutions?

    More 1080p TN panels? Yawn. Wake me up when they have a 3D display that can compete with my Dell UltraSharp.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 8 years ago

    A 27″ display with 1920×1080 resolution, sigh…….

    • ShadowTiger
    • 8 years ago

    These glasses only have a one year warranty. While it is not an ideal test case, when I visited nVidia HQ once and got to use the glasses, the failure rate seemed high enough that I would second guess the $150 price tag.

    Edit: Amazon seems to offer 3rd party warranties for a small premium.

    • odizzido
    • 8 years ago

    I am surprised that this stuff is popular enough for them to update the technology.

    I am not going to complain though as it seems this stuff is pushing monitor tech in the direction I like.

    • Goty
    • 8 years ago

    And you thought you got headaches before!

      • Sargent Duck
      • 8 years ago

      Send me $200 and I’ll ship you a really nice hammer that you can hit your head with. I garuntee you a headache!

    • napobm43
    • 8 years ago

    Asus monitor looks sweet, but it would be sweeter if one could actually buy it.

    Best guesses I can dig up are that they will be showcasing it at Blizzcon next week and that it “might” be out soon, but nothing official.

    Anybody got anything more official on this??

      • DarkUltra
      • 8 years ago

      Asus 120hz monitors have poor black levels so you miss details in the shadows in games, pictures and movies. It also has varying input lag that might cause stuttering. Go for the lg w2363d if you can find it – it’s discontinued 🙁

    • tviceman
    • 8 years ago

    1920×1200 – it’s dead Jim. 🙁

      • MadManOriginal
      • 8 years ago

      I’m not sure whether to uprate or downrate your post:

      +1 for Star Terk nerd reference

      -1 for saying 16:10 is dead, except you lament it with the 🙁 at the same time.

      I guess I will just leave your rating alone and post this reply.

        • dpaus
        • 8 years ago

        He’s a doctor, not an Industry Executive!

      • Bauxite
      • 8 years ago

      2560×1600 is the new 1920×1200

      Get it while it lasts, the 16:9 disease has already creeped up to 27″

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        You 16:10 guys… Look at your laptop keyboard. Do you have space on the sides or up/below? Which way would you rather have your screen aspect ratio go – increased width or increased height (knowing it will affect the space available for your keyboard keys)?

        Personally, I prefer 16:9. I understand you guys are talking about monitors, but support for a standard size tends to get proliferated across the whole infrastructure fast, and I much rather sacrifice 16:10 than 16:9.

          • Meadows
          • 8 years ago

          Does this look like a laptop screen to you, Lord Moronius?

          • rechicero
          • 8 years ago

          In a 15″ laptop, you earn 0,36 inches (less than 1 cm) for the keyboard and lose 0,59 inches of vertical screen. And 120 pixels.

          And, in fact, you can have those 0,36 inches in 16:10, too. You just need to add 0,18 inches more of bezel (less than half a cm) . So, in fact, you’re sacrificing precious vertical space and 5% of area for… nothing?

          Yeah, that Dr. Moronius moniker suits you pretty well.

          • no51
          • 8 years ago

          I’d like 16:9 better if it were called 17.78:10. Seriously.

            • DarkUltra
            • 8 years ago

            I think it should be 16:9 instead of 17.78:10 because almost always reduce the height with 120 pixels. If you had inreased the with, to 2133, you would.

        • Madman
        • 8 years ago

        16:9 is a nice aspect ratio. It could even be even more wider.

        I wouldn’t mind doubling the pixels though, but 16:9 feels very natural and cool.

          • DarkUltra
          • 8 years ago

          I guess you are minimizing the ribbon and have the double-sized windows 7 task bar moved to the side of the screen? 🙂

          There are plenty of 16:9 monitors, so no need to complain about that. I just want a single, good 1920×1200 24″ 120hz monitor grrr

      • Duck
      • 8 years ago

      *It’s dead, Jim.

        • Arclight
        • 8 years ago

        Ohh, grammar police is here.

      • burntham77
      • 8 years ago

      And what is worse is in order to get the 2560×1600, you have to pay 1200 dollars or more. Lord.

    • indeego
    • 8 years ago

    Doubles as hipster frames. Can we get a fixie chain for our GPU fans also?

      • LaChupacabra
      • 8 years ago

      Oh please. No hipsters would wear these. EVERYONE knows the Gen 1 has a more authentic 3d effect.

        • d0g_p00p
        • 8 years ago

        Hipsters would not wear these anyway, there is no Apple logo on it.

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