Rumor: 28-nm Radeons could show up in early December

This might not be the first report to predict a December arrival for AMD’s 28-nm Radeons. However, it’s certainly the most recent, which gives it an extra dash of plausibility. According to Heise Online, we’ll see the first 28-nm Radeon GPUs make their debut in the second week of December, or possibly as early as December 6.

The German site attributes the information to sources in "business circles." It adds that folks in "board partners circles" expect a limited supply of 28-nm parts in December, allegedly because TSMC "has problems with the 28-nanometer process." Manufacturing issues at TSMC curbed the supply of the first 40-nm GPUs a couple years back, and the foundry firm subsequently scrapped plans for a 32-nm process. It could well be stumbling at 28 nm, too—but we’ll reserve judgment until we can check availability for ourselves.

Here’s what we know for sure right now: AMD has promised to deliver 28-nm graphics products this year, and it has vowed to work with both TSMC and GlobalFoundries on 28-nm production. Nvidia, meanwhile, plans to begin production of its next-gen 28-nm Kepler GPUs next year.

Comments closed
    • clone
    • 9 years ago

    why throw all the eggs into one basket?

    global foundry’s does silicon why we the end users have been forced to wait for TSMC all the time to get manufacturing going is beyond me.

    can’t farm to Intel?, GloFO?

    TSMC or nothing?

    • michael_d
    • 9 years ago

    I am curious if the new series will support PCI-E 3.0 as it will make a good match with Ivy Bridge.

    • Chrispy_
    • 9 years ago

    29-nm Radeons will just be die-shrinks of Cayman won’t they?

    I though AMD was doing a tick-tock now, avoiding new architecture and a process-shrink at the same time….

      • eofpi
      • 9 years ago

      The GPU side seems to.

      The CPU side, however….

    • sweatshopking
    • 9 years ago

    I’ll happily trade an nvidia 7800 for a radeon 7800 when they come out. if any of you bros want to make the trade, just pm me.

      • ronch
      • 9 years ago

      I knew the Radeon and Geforce numbers had to match up sooner or later.

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 years ago

        so…. is that a yes?

          • ronch
          • 9 years ago

          I kinda prefer AMD’s take on ‘7800’. Sorry.

      • mesyn191
      • 9 years ago

      I’ll ship the box to you and everything! 😀

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 9 years ago

    Just imagine if the 7xxx series doesn’t live up to performance expectations… AMD will be in some serious trouble.

    • Xenolith
    • 9 years ago

    The bad news is that the first batch will likely be mid-range cards. High-end will probably come after the holidays. Just going by the 6xxx launch cycle.

    • HighTech4US2
    • 9 years ago

    Kepler production starts THIS year not next year.

    [url<]http://www.fudzilla.com/graphics/item/23757-kepler-production-starts-this-year[/url<]

      • Goty
      • 9 years ago

      So you believe that Fuad tells the truth but believe that Charlie lies habitually? How does that work?

        • HighTech4US2
        • 9 years ago

        Faud reports rumors equally no matter which company is involved.

        char-LIE distorts or just plain makes up stuff against Nvidia. His anti-Nvidia bias is blatant.

        As for which one I believe: I would take Faud’s rumor before Char-LIE’s rumor anytime it involves Nvidia.

      • ronch
      • 9 years ago

      Not to badmouth Fudzilla or SemiAccurate, but for me they’re nowhere to being the best news sites around.

        • bwcbiz
        • 9 years ago

        Technically, they’re rumor sites. Sort of a techies’ Drudge Report. That’s why they’re called FUDzilla and SEMIaccurate. So yeah, your distrust is in the right place. They aren’t out to deceive, they just concentrate more on being first with a story than on being correct.

    • nstuff
    • 9 years ago

    was it really a good idea that they spun off their manufacturing side?

      • sschaem
      • 9 years ago

      It wasn’t a choice.

        • HighTech4US2
        • 9 years ago

        Well the choice was self made as AMD had to sell the fab for cash (they were broke) because of the continuous loses from the years of being behind Intel.

        And what will AMD sell now (do they have anything of value) when the loses again appear.

    • pogsnet1
    • 9 years ago

    If they never skipped 32nm, we have new generation GPU by now. It’s TSMC’s fault. skipping things does not mean shortcut.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 9 years ago

    Its one of those things where if they can’t get adequate supplies all it does is inflate prices. I want a new GPU but I’m kinda budget constrained at the moment. 🙁

    • dpaus
    • 9 years ago

    Intel has start-up problems with new fab processes too, they just don’t get as much publicity.

      • bcronce
      • 9 years ago

      That’s because Intel’s fabs are almost 2 generations ahead of everyone else. If Intel stumbles for a few months, they’re still well over a year ahead of the competition.

        • dpaus
        • 9 years ago

        Correct, but not my point. All I meant was that [i<]anyone[/i<] can have problems with a new, bleeding-edge process, but since Intel's are entirely internal, we usually don't hear about it.

          • flip-mode
          • 9 years ago

          Yeah, I’ve never seen it said even if it has been, but I’ve had a hunch that by the time Intel officially moves to a new process that “new process” has already been tuned to the point of, essentially, full maturity. I.e., the maturity of Intel’s “new” manufacturing process is usually equivalent to what GloFo’s or TSMC’s process maturity would be after the process has been in full production for a year or so.

            • Hattig
            • 9 years ago

            I’m not sure about that – some of Intel’s past new process launches have had quite slow ramps initially. I expect that all companies launch on the new process when it is in their best interest to do so, and that is usually as early as possible to benefit from smaller dies, lower power consumption, etc.

            • clone
            • 9 years ago

            Intel Pentium 3 1113mhz cpu recall, Prescott failure… it happens but as mentioned they are so far ahead that it RARELY matters.

          • bcronce
          • 9 years ago

          ahh, I see.. lack of transparency vs lack of news coverage.

          • ImSpartacus
          • 9 years ago

          It’s not ‘bleeding edge’ if Intel has already been doing it for more than a year. Intel is approaching the two year anniversary of their first 32nm products (Clarkdale).

          Yes, Bulldozer’s die is more than three times the size of Clarkdale, but we’re talking about a time period long enough to invoke Moore’s Law.

          I don’t care about publicity, I care about results.

      • Arclight
      • 9 years ago

      Intel is working on 22nm not 28nm (someone correct me if i’m wrong), so it can be said Intel is still ahead. Not that it will do much good for their GPUs, or should i say IGPs…

        • Farting Bob
        • 9 years ago

        Intel will likely have 22nm out around the same time as 28nm GPU’s. And they have 32nm widely available which is comparable to 28nm as its had time to mature over the soon-to-be-released 28nm process.

        • bcronce
        • 9 years ago

        “Intel is working on 22nm”

        Yes and No. They had 22nm ready, but because of lack of competition and problems with chip design, they kept postponing its release. The finally got their “Trigate” tech to work, so they figured “why release a worse version of 22nm when we can debut an even BETTER version and still before anyone else?”

        Intel plans on releasing 14nm in 2013 for their smaller chips(Atom). So, Intel will have trigate 22nm in 2012 and 14nm in 2013. Everyone else is 28nm in 2012 with lots of problems, and hopefully high volume 28nm in 2013 and hopefully 20nm also.

          • Duck
          • 9 years ago

          2012 will have 32nm ramp up at GloFo compared to 22nm ramp up at Intel.

          As for “Everyone else is 28nm in 2012 with lots of problems”, I don’t think that is very accurate.

            • bcronce
            • 9 years ago

            I meant “lots of problems” as “lots of problems with supply”. I’m sure they’ll fix any issues throughout the year, but Intel had a quite good 32nm release over a year ago, and these people are still struggling.

            • ImSpartacus
            • 9 years ago

            They had a good 32nm release because Clarkdale was their first 32nm part.

            Bulldozer is about 3.5 times bigger than Clarkdale. Intel was smart to debut a new node on a tiny chip.

          • Arclight
          • 9 years ago

          True but that’s the CPU side. No matter which node their on for the IGPs, they will still be behind AMD, just like AMD will still be behind Intel on CPU.

      • Farting Bob
      • 9 years ago

      Because they are a year or more ahead of anybody else, so if they delay things 3 months they are still dominating, and then when they do release there is usually a decent number of chips to go around. TSMC tend to delay quite a bit, then release a very small amount of cards so everyone gets reviews then has to wait a while for products to actually have decent availability where prices can stablise.

    • Duck
    • 9 years ago

    Even if they are technically released in Dec, you wont be able to buy one until next year when production ramps up (unless you are ok with paying over the odds to get one).

    At least this means we will get a review this year.

      • Arclight
      • 9 years ago

      Yup a review this year will be nice. But idk from the translation IF the video cards in question are high end or not….AMD has been showing only mobile video cards lately so….for me it’s still unclear which segment of the market will be catered, or better said “teased” in December.

        • Duck
        • 9 years ago

        High end part (HD7900 series) will be next year for sure. That is because it will be built on the high performance node.

        Mid range parts like the HD7800 and below will be built on the low power node.

          • HighTech4US2
          • 9 years ago

          > High end part (HD7900 series) will be next year for sure.

          Thats true.

          Most posters here think that the first 28mn GPU parts from AMD or Nvidia will be the high end parts and they are wrong.

          The first 28nm parts will be mobile first, low/mid desktop 2nd and finally high-end.

          Mobile needs to be first because of Ivy Bridge design cycle.

          • bcronce
          • 9 years ago

          I can’t wait. Not as much that I want/need to upgrade my 6950(unlocked), but I need to upgrade my wife’s 4850. And what better reason to purchase a 7900 than to give my wife my current awesome card. 😛

          Supporting AMD is what I want to do. I hope they fix their BD issues with Piledriver because I plan on upgrading my i7-920 and the current BD is more of a side-grade.

            • Arclight
            • 9 years ago

            [quote<]Supporting AMD is what I want to do. I hope they fix their BD issues with Piledriver because I plan on upgrading my i7-920 and the current BD is more of a side-grade.[/quote<] That's more of a down grade and don't support AMD (or any company for that matter) if they put out sh*ty products: like Barcelona and now Bulldozer. When and if they get it right, then support them. The graphics side of AMD did things right and is atm worthy of your hard owned cash if price is honest in your country compared to the competition.

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 9 years ago

            By all means – don’t support AMD after all they have enough money to last an eternity and besides a complete intel monopoly would be just fine!

            /sarcasm.

            Short term view for the lose.

            • NeelyCam
            • 9 years ago

            You are a saint for sacrificing your own PC comfort for the greater good. But I don’t like it when you start snapping at people for not doing the same… that’s not very saint-like.

            • Bensam123
            • 9 years ago

            I’ve considered the above as well. A lot of people are shortsighted, like yourself, so people with a broader point of view have to express it so other people can understand what is happening behind their very logical immediate actions. Sometimes saints need to have a heavy hand in order for people to understand.

            • NeelyCam
            • 9 years ago

            Saints can also be wrong, and their arrogance or selection bias may mean they don’t consider the alternatives.

            In all likelihood ARM will take over the spot AMD has had in the past. Forcing people to buy AMD could potentially mean that they end up suffering from poor performance for years while AMD is going through a slow death. All that time they could’ve been enjoying the performance/efficiency/whatever_may_matter_to_a_given_person (through buying Intel), or supporting the next big competitor and monopoly buster (ARM).

            It’s perfectly fine to suggest that people should buy AMD to keep AMD alive in the name of competition, but snarky remarks and contempt towards those who choose to do something different is unjustified.

            • Duck
            • 9 years ago

            We love an underdog. BD may be fixed in the consumer line like the replacement for Llano. BD in AM3 form is just not designed for good general performance.

            They need to loose all that L3 for a start. Memory latencies need to be dramatically reduced. It has 4 hypertransport links, only 1 of which gets used on the desktop… so they can go too. Needs PCIe moved on die with power gating. IPC improvements to at least match the Phenom II. A bit more time to mature 32nm and scale higher. Oh and 8 cores are too many, 4 will do. The whole thing needs to be < 1 billion transistors, overclocks to 5GHz.

            • eofpi
            • 9 years ago

            Or even just die shrink Thuban and give it Bulldozer’s memory controller and new instructions support. Maybe throw in BD’s FPU, too.

    • sweatshopking
    • 9 years ago

    WHAT?!??!?! DELAYS DUE TO MANUFACTURING ISSUES?!?!?!!? NEVER!!!!!

      • CB5000
      • 9 years ago

      Yeah, ikr? New process, trouble manufacturing them… Should be a given.

        • NeelyCam
        • 9 years ago

        Here’s some batteries – your detector doesn’t seem to be working

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    Can’t come soon enough to save the day for AMD after the FX botch-up.

      • Grigory
      • 9 years ago

      Yep. If AMD falls for good Intel will fork us sideways, upside down and inside out. 🙁

        • khands
        • 9 years ago

        If AMD closes shop it will be the writing on the wall for Intel as well. Anti-trust is a bitch.

          • Arclight
          • 9 years ago

          Ironic, like most things in life…

          • Suspenders
          • 9 years ago

          I don’t really think it would be. Everyone keeps saying that, almost to the point of that being a religious belief, but it seems far more likely to me that Intel would just bribe the government (sorry, I meant make some “campaign contributions”) and be on its’ merry way. Especially so given how corrupt government/industry has become.

          Any anti-trust thing for Intel would probably be at most a slap on the wrist.

            • clone
            • 9 years ago

            it wouldn’t work that way, Intel while huge doesn’t have enough money to out bribe the industry, public perception would eviscerate them and even if Intel did manage to bribe it’s way into the pocket in the U.S. they’d have to bribe the rest of the world as well because all of the governments would want a cut.

            remember when Japan raided Intel’s offices, then Europe, then after the long money ran out the U.S. FTC finally raided Intel’s offices to see how they had strong armed the industry into not buying AMD product when it was superior had this happened a few more years from now it would be China that raided Intel’s offices and they’d have had a hella lot more to lose at that point.

            bribery is business as usual the world over as well as in the U.S. but the U.S. is no longer the world and it’s cheaper for intel to keep AMD afloat.

            better for us as well.

          • ronch
          • 9 years ago

          AMD couldn’t design a light bulb if they had to. Maybe Intel should just let AMD clone their chips again. Oh wait, AMD doesn’t have fabs anymore and they can’t just pass the blueprints straight over to GF and ask them to fab the chips for them, can they?

            • bwcbiz
            • 9 years ago

            There actually is a grain of truth here. The most successful AMD technologies have all been obtained by buying out other companies. The original Athlon technologies that culminated in the Athlon and Phenom II were based on NexGen’s design work. And of course the Radeon line still has its roots in ATI.

            On the other hand, when given a superior platform such as K6 to work on, AMD is perfectly capable of expanding and enhancing the platform successfully. For a couple of examples, the AMD64 instruction set extensions for 64-bit operations won out in the marketplace over Intel’s Itanium (IA-64) instructions, and the HyperTransport technology was superior to the Intel Netburst technology in 2005-2006.

            • tfp
            • 9 years ago

            IA-64 was never targeted or introduced to desktops it was barely introduced into the very high end workstation market (now a comparison now vs POWER or ULTERA SPARC is very valid). Hyper Transport and Netburst have almost nothing in common.

            If you want to compare FSB you would need to compare AMDs “Dual pumped” FSB vs Intel’s “Quad Pumped” FSB for that time frame. However if you want to use the complete life of Intel’s standard FSB it’s pretty easy to show at least on the desktop the Intel’s cache and prefetcher w/ FSB on the Core2 chips more than make up for what Hyper Transport could do for AMD.

            • mesyn191
            • 9 years ago

            There were rumors Intel wanted to push IA64 down into consumer products too. Never went anywhere but then neither did Itanium and that was before x64 really took off too in the consumer space.

            • Airmantharp
            • 9 years ago

            Rumors? IA64 is why AMD beat Intel to 64-bit x86; that was their only goal till AMD forced their hand.

            • mesyn191
            • 9 years ago

            Officially Intel denied it IIRC.

          • mesyn191
          • 9 years ago

          Nope. They didn’t even bust up the banks after how they trashed the economy, they gave them shit loads more cash and actually made them bigger too. The regulators and government have also allowed huge amounts of consolidation elsewhere too: ISP’s, healthcare, insurance, retail stores, drug stores, etc.

          The last few administrations have been super pro mega corp/big business. They won’t to crap do Intel short of something truly insane like faulty Intel hardware somehow causing missiles to target school children only or something.

      • sschaem
      • 9 years ago

      Considering AMD graphic division is now loosing money, anything would help.

        • ronch
        • 9 years ago

        Anything would help? How about they venture into construction? They already have sledgehammers, clawhammers, bulldozers, and new tools like piledrivers, steamrollers and excavators are coming up. And of course, the man with a shovel in case these tools/machines fail to deliver.

          • NeelyCam
          • 9 years ago

          [quote<]And of course, the man with a shovel [/quote<] Um... Zacate?

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This