Video tutorial demystifies liquid nitrogen overclocking

Hoping to build a liquid-nitrogen-cooled overclocking rig this weekend? What do you mean, "no"? Okay, well, if you were, you’d probably enjoy Corsair’s latest tutorial video. In it, extreme overclocker Jake Crimmins demystifies the whole concept, showing that that cooling an overclocking rig with liquid nitrogen isn’t that hard—you just need the right equipment… and a blowtorch.

Crimmins claims he managed to hit a 3DMark 2011 top-10 score with his Core i7-990X pushed to 5.79GHz, quite a respectable increase over the stock 3.47GHz. That might be shy of recent Guinness records, but in this case, it doesn’t look like any cores were disabled.

Liquid nitrogen is a wonderful thing, and not just for extreme overclocking. Now if only someone would come up with a room-temperature superconductor…

Comments closed
    • Xenolith
    • 8 years ago

    How do you cool the graphics cards with liquid nitrogen?

    • Mr Bill
    • 8 years ago

    This is definitely something to NOT try at home… I wonder if this freeze bug can be avoided by using a suitable intermediate fluid? Stable Isotope labs commonly use a pentane nitrogen slurry which gives you a slush of frozen and liquid pentane stable at -130C. Its fairly “safe” to use torches a few feet away because the vapor pressure necessary for ignition is suppressed by the low temperature. The other advantage is that you don’t get oxygen condensing into the slurry because its too warm. Anyway with this sort of setup, the propane torch would not be needed once you added the slurry.

    • Arclight
    • 8 years ago

    AMD CPUs (like Phenom II and Bulldozer) don’t have cold bug? Cause i remember them saying this in many videos.

      • drfish
      • 8 years ago

      Correct, no cold bug for AMD – thats how they can justify using liquid helium… Well, maybe “justify” is the wrong word…

        • Arclight
        • 8 years ago

        Meh it was just an FYI, not like it makes a huge difference, like you said.

    • Faiakes
    • 8 years ago

    What bench are they using?

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      It looks like walnut, but that might just be a veneer. Beneath that shiny exterior, there’s probably a cheap presswood core, or maybe two glued together. And see that line running the length of the bench? It’s clearly one of the new dual-module/quad-core benches. If you pull the two halves apart, there’s a small additional section hidden under the two modules that can be inserted and used to give some extra capacity. Because it has no legs of it’s own, it’s called the ‘floating-point unit’

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        YOU GET A + FROM ME!!!

        so… can this be used as a closed system permanent solution?

          • moriz
          • 8 years ago

          if you can keep the liquid nitrogen… liquid, then sure. probably will need a pump, tubing, and reservoir that can stand the low temperatures.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            yeah, that was what i was thinking… you’d have to have a damn good seal, and some frigggin low temp equipment. Not really practical, unless you’re in a competition.

            • Waco
            • 8 years ago

            …and some way of keeping it under so much pressure that it won’t boil. 😛

      • Faiakes
      • 8 years ago

      😀

      So does anyone know the brand of this open bench base?

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This