Indilinx Everest controller sets up shop in OCZ Octane SSDs

OCZ has finally revealed more details about solid-state drives based on the Indilinx Everest controller it revealed this summer. The controller is an eight-channel design that supports 16-way interleaving. OCZ claims the chip has the lowest latency in the industry and offers "fast boot technology" that cuts boot times in half versus its contemporary competition.

Interestingly, the briefing slides posted at AnandTech take a passing shot at the write compression technology inherent to SandForce drives by boasting, "No data compression-related limitations; this is in contrast to competing offerings." There’s also mention of an nDurance technology that supposedly increases NAND endurance by up to a factor of two. nDurance isn’t explained in much detail, but it doesn’t look like data compression is involved.

According to the press release, two flavors of Octane SSDs will be available starting November 1. The standard Octane line will have a 6Gbps SATA interface and sustained read and write speeds as high as 560 and 400MB/s, respectively. For folks with older systems, the Octane-S2 comes with a 3Gbps interface and maximum speed ratings of 275MB/s for reads and 265MB/s for writes. The standard Octane will use 2x-nm synchronous flash memory, while its S2 counterpart is decked out with cheaper asynchronous NAND. Both models will be available in capacities as high as 1TB.

They’ll apparently be pretty affordable, too. Although specific prices aren’t mentioned, the slides list a target cost-per-gigabyte range of $1.10-1.30. Our storage test rigs are itching to put the Octane through its paces, and we should have our hands on the new SSDs soon. Stay tuned.

Comments closed
    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    woot… hope to see more SSD benches.

    You should consider telling people of how long it takes to test each individual drive in your methodology though. I wasn’t aware of it tell I read some of your comments or your justification behind only testing a handful of drives.

    • Ryhadar
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]Both models will be available in capacities as high as 1TB.[/quote<] Cool! [quote<]They'll apparently be pretty affordable, too. Although specific prices aren't mentioned, the slides list a target cost-per-gigabyte range of $1.10-1.30[/quote<] Affordable eh? Let's see... $1.10 / gigabyte is pretty close to $1. So $1 * 1024 -- or is that 1000? Anyway, a 1 TB drive will cost!... *does math* Oh, right...

      • theonespork
      • 8 years ago

      In fairness, that price range would put these drives at the forefront of the most recent testing, and if the quoted performance is within, say, 85% of actual, these drives would have won the recent throw down. That is impressive, and at the very least, something worth looking forward to testing.

      I do not know a lot of people that need a a Terabyte of fast storage on a home system just yet. 256Gb plus a mass storage drive VERY comfortably covers 95% of all users. You may be in the 5%, but the 5% always pays more by virtue of the size of their market.

    • dashbarron
    • 8 years ago

    As one of their new features, OCZ plans for these drives not to BSOD. More news to follow!

      • drfish
      • 8 years ago

      The BSOD issue is annoying and [u<]inexcusable[/u<] but honestly its not [i<]that[/i<] bad in practice - I get a freeze a couple times a week... It would piss me off a little more on a work system than my gaming rig. That doesn't mean I'm not hoping that the new firmware from yesterday doesn't squish the problem once and for all. *fingers crossed* Also, I saw that Vertex2 120GB drives are $119 after rebate with free shipping at NewEgg - guess what barrier all the rage over their big brother's BSODs helped break? I'm sure the poor reviews drove the price down a lot. Its funny though, I've has issues with ~20% of the first gen (Indilinx) Vertex drives, and 100% of the Vertex3s but I've never had a first gen Sandforce drive so much as hiccup...

        • JohnC
        • 8 years ago

        [quote<] Its funny though, I've has issues with ~20% of the first gen (Indilinx) Vertex drives, and 100% of the Vertex3s but I've never had a first gen Sandforce drive so much as hiccup... [/quote<] Nothing funny or surprising there, it just shows the general inability of OCZ to deliver a stable firmware, regardless of the controller brand and series.

        • Palek
        • 8 years ago

        [quote<]The BSOD issue is annoying and inexcusable but honestly its not that bad in practice - I get a freeze a couple times a week... It would piss me off a little more on a work system than my gaming rig.[/quote<] That may have been acceptable in the good old days of Windows 95/98/ME, but I had almost no random freezes on Windows XP (except due to a very specific hardware failure), and I cannot remember a single lock-up with Windows 7. Having random BSODs would drive me nuts.

        • travbrad
        • 8 years ago

        [quote<]its not that bad in practice - I get a freeze a couple times a week[/quote<] I get crashes 0 times a week, without an OCZ SSD.

        • dashbarron
        • 8 years ago

        I agree with you. At a [b<] much much [/b<] lower price than the competitor I could probably make do with a glitch and it wouldn't be world-stopping.

      • StashTheVampede
      • 8 years ago

      These drives will reboot after a BSOD so fast, you won’t even notice them anymore.

      • Bensam123
      • 8 years ago

      Wasn’t there a news release a couple days ago about OCZ releasing new firmware that fixes that?

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 8 years ago

    It’s nice to see someone make a point of latency and not gimmicks for boosting read and write speeds to some level you’ll never actually see in reality. Even though access time for a SSD vs. HDD is significantly improved, there’s still bound to be a lot of back and forth to work on between the CPU, SATA controller, SSD controller, flash channels…blah blah blah.

      • maxxcool
      • 8 years ago

      all i care about in a ssd is *real sustained random iop/s* .. you know the stuff that happens when your *not* benchmarking and writing fluffy magazine ads

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    God I want a SSD so bad, I’m tired of slow boot and sleep recovery.

    • Zorb
    • 8 years ago

    It’s obvious that the Sandforce issues have finally forced them to start looking elsewhere for a new controller….

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 years ago

      Which may be the first step in rehabilitating their image. There’s no chance I’d consider an OCZ SSD at the moment, but if their Indilinx-based drives don’t exhibit the same support forum carnage, I might consider one in the future.

      • Hrunga Zmuda
      • 8 years ago

      Yep, no compression like Sandforce.

      • stdRaichu
      • 8 years ago

      Isn’t this why they bought Indilinx in the first place – so they wouldn’t be (almost) solely dependant on a third-party product?

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