Arkham City PC requirements come to light

PC gamers will have to wait almost four more weeks to get our hands on Batman: Arkham City. For some, that will be a good opportunity to upgrade. Shacknews has posted the game’s minimum and recommend system requirements, and it sounds like you’ll need a relatively beefy PC to enjoy all of the eye candy on display.

Recommended System Requirements

  • Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7
  • CPU: Dual-Core CPU 2.5 GHz
  • RAM: 4GB
  • Graphics Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 or ATI Radeon HD 6850 with 768MB+ of VRAM (DirectX 11 compatible)
  • Sound: Microsoft Windows XP/Vista or 7 compatible sound card (100 per cent DirectX 9.0c-compatible)
  • DVD-ROM: Quad-speed (4x) DVD-ROM drive
  • Hard Drive: 17.5 GB free disk space
  • Input Devices: 100 per cent Windows XP/Vista or 7 compatible mouse and keyboard or Xbox 360 Controller for Windows

The Radeon HD 6850 and GeForce GTX 460 1GB still sell for 150 bucks. (Nvidia discontinued the cheaper, 768MB version of the GTX 460 some time ago.) Luckily, 2GB DIMMs are a dime a dozen, and any self-respecting PC gamer should have at least 4GB of RAM in their system already. The same goes for CPUs with two or more speedy cores.

As Shacknews points out, Arkham City will support DirectX 11 tessellation. The game will also give GeForce owners some special treats, including hardware-accelerated PhysX effects and GeForce 3D Vision support.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 8 years ago

    “Tesselation” + TWIMTBP = Use 1000 polygons where 4 will suffice.

    • LoneWolf15
    • 8 years ago

    It sounds like a great game.

    One thing though –am I the only one mildly (yes, curmudgeonly) annoyed by the title “Arkham City”? Why not have made the title “Gotham City” or something that represented a real city in the Batman universe?

    My logic filter just isn’t parsing this one. Maybe I’m just getting old.

      • khands
      • 8 years ago

      It’s because the game takes place in a prison like city.

    • KeillRandor
    • 8 years ago

    Does/will this game require Windows 7 or will it still run on winXP? It’s just that I still haven’t got an external/removable HDD for Win 7 sorted yet – (don’t want to touch my WinXP setup for music, and from what I can tell, win 7 doesn’t play nicely with an already installed winXP 🙁 ).

      • Geistbar
      • 8 years ago

      What exactly is so complicated about your setup for music though? I would think you should be moving the music over to the external drive instead. An OS running from an external drive probably won’t be performing too impressively anyway (unless it’s an external SATA drive, I suppose).

      If you partition your primary hard drive right, you can store your data on a different partition from the OS. It won’t protect your data from hard drive failure, but it will allow you to format the OS partition without losing any of the data on the other partition.

        • KeillRandor
        • 8 years ago

        I have all my music data & software spread across 12 partitions on 2 HDD’s – one 1TB SATA (with windows) and one 250GB IDE. (My C: partition alone is 75GB in size (used about 50GB so far)). (I have it backed up, of course – including on another HDD my Dad has 😉 ). (I like to organise my data and software heavily…)

        (It’s took me quite a while to get everything back up and running after I upgraded to Cubase and Reason 5 – I’d rather not go through all that again :p ).

        (It’s my sound-card that’s holding me back on win XP – (Edirol DA2496) – but getting another 8×8 won’t be cheap :-/ ).

        I have games installed on one more HDD – (including installs I no longer have working discs for 🙁 ). I then have another 200GB IDE drive I use for other stuff – got my ‘jukebox’ on there etc.. So, I have 4 HDD’s atm, all currently used, with 17 partitions in total – 7 of which are on my windows disk, so would be swapped with a win 7 HDD…

        (Can you tell I used to be an Amiga user? 😉 ).

        A hot-swap bay isn’t that expensive, thankfully, but I’m a bit strapped for cash atm – (damn birthday/Christmas presents :p) – so I’ll leave the extra HDD for Christmas – (everyone knows it’s best just to give me money these days 😉 ).

        EDIT: just read on Hardocp that yes, it does support Winxp 🙂 I guess my sister will be happy – (and me – it’s just she really wants to play it, so she can go buy it *for me* 😉 ).

          • Geistbar
          • 8 years ago

          Wow. Uh.. no offense, but that whole setup sounds needlessly complicated. I just create an OS partition, install the OS and software to that, then put everything else on a data partition (with other hard drives handling other, more static data / backups). But if it works for you.. well, it works for you. Good luck eventually moving things around so you can switch to Win7 (it’s worth it!).

            • KeillRandor
            • 8 years ago

            Well, as with other content production – if you don’t organise the resources you have, especially when they easily fit into simple types, you’re going to struggle to keep track of everything. If I was into 3d art instead, I’d have different partitions for models and textures etc.. (Different partitions makes it especially helpful when using Dopus too – (http://www.gpsoft.com.au/)). (Will have to buy a newer version when I ‘upgrade’ to Win 7 – not cheap at ~£50, though I doubt I could live without it :-/) (Having a ‘drive’+sc toolbar at the bottom of the screen makes it SO much easier :p ).

            I won’t have to ‘move’ anything – that’s the point. The main HDD at the minute contains all my music stuff, with some duplicates or other resources on another HDD. The whole point about a win 7 drive atm, is that it’d be there just for games, really, and self-contained – (installed on the same disk – with saves backed up).

            • Geistbar
            • 8 years ago

            Well, again- no offense, but it just sounds completely needlessly complicated. I can’t see an organization method that is constructed using multiple partitions that couldn’t be done with multiple folders on a single partition (d:\music\organized_a & d:\music\organized_b and so on, vs. d:\music and e:\music. and … r:\music). I’ve put a lot of effort into organizing all of my files; most people who see it think I’m crazy (and maybe I am, but I don’t think organizing my files would be the reason), so I know things can be kept very well organized, while being consolidated to a single partition.

            All the same, again, if it works for you, well, it works for you, and it doesn’t matter what I think.

            • KeillRandor
            • 8 years ago

            Don’t underestimate the security of multiple partitions – (had problems before that were contained by that). Also, as I explain in my reply to LoneWolf below – I use Dopus:

            [url<]http://i.imgur.com/mAcoD.jpg[/url<] (Cubase screenshot).

          • LoneWolf15
          • 8 years ago

          Step 1. Install Windows 7 on a new, fast boot drive.
          Step 2. Add a second drive for storage.
          Step 3. Redirect your Documents, Pictures, Music, and Video folders to the second drive. Consider this your games drive too –this way, should you ever need to reinstall Windows, you have all of your stuff on the second drive, and Windows 7 makes this redirection easy.
          Step 4. Copy your music to the single music folder rather than that insanely complicated setup. Do the same for the rest of your data, putting it in the single place where it belongs, with sub-folders to organize what you need.
          Step 5. Be very, very happy that you no longer have an overcomplicated, claptrap of files and folders.

          About the only thing I do differently than the above is I still have a GAMES folder that I custom-install to rather than letting Program Files be the resting place. Probably a third of my games are Steam now, so I have the Steam folder as well.

            • KeillRandor
            • 8 years ago

            How can having a separate partition for each data type be over-complicated if I would need to keep the same format even if it was simply folders???? And this way I don’t have to worry about problems with one affecting the others. (I’ve ran into situations where single partitions were affected by problems, but not affected others, so merely wiping and replacing one was possible – with a single partition with everything on it, well… *shudder*.) It also makes it far quicker and easier to access each partition from the drive toolbar in Dopus like I said, leaving shortcuts for merely software/vstplugins folder etc.. As I said – I’m an old Amiga user – I’m used to using lots of partitions to organise data, and found the use in that LONG ago…

            • LoneWolf15
            • 8 years ago

            “How can having a separate partition for each data type be over-complicated if I would need to keep the same format even if it was simply folders???? ”

            Over-complicated due to a large number of drive letters, especially if you have need for drive letters due to an xx-in-1 flash card reader, optical drives, external backup drive, etc. Note –I used to do things the way you do, around the time of Windows 95/98; I find that Windows 7 makes that method unnecessary. Operating systems are by and large trying to help users switch from using drive letters to using folders for the very reason of making it easier, and not just for novices.

            “(I’ve ran into situations where single partitions were affected by problems, but not affected others, so merely wiping and replacing one was possible – with a single partition with everything on it, well… *shudder*.)”

            The above says to me that you don’t have an effective backup solution. If you did, partition problems wouldn’t matter. Note that Windows 7 also has a highly improved backup over XP and earlier, making it possible to bare-metal backup your system easily.
            As for me, I haven’t had a partition problem since before NTFS, though once again, I have a good backup solution in case.

            Using a drive for boot, then one for data (so you can reload the OS on-the-fly if you choose to) and then perhaps one for actual backup should simplify things. One other note –if you’re still tied to your partitions after all of this, Windows 7 can dynamically resize partitions on the fly, something that XP cannot.

            • KeillRandor
            • 8 years ago

            I don’t like the thought of having to reinstall/copy/restore hundreds of GB’s worth of data and software (and increasing) if something goes wrong. Much better if it’s just 10’s of GB’s at most if possible…

            I bought the 1TB HDD just before I upgraded Reason and Cubase aswell, so I know what it takes to copy and restore everything when I set that up – and I’d rather not have to do all that again.

            It’s not about HAVING backups – it’s about the size and scope of them. Atm, I’ve got the important data & software backed up on multiple HDD’s – both locally and off-site. But that doesn’t include all the other software I’m (almost continuously it seems) downloading/upgrading etc. – even as we speak. Most of my software, especially the downloads – (samples/refills etc.) – is on/backed up on DVD, but that’s slow…

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 8 years ago

            Your system seems needlessly complicated for very little potential benefit. In addition you come across slightly smug at how your system works.

            I have never come across a “filesystem error” that did not affect the entire disk. If you do, I feel that you are doing something incorrectly.

    • Aveon
    • 8 years ago

    “17.5 GB of hard drive space ”
    Whats in to games these days. I suerly need to get more storage now .
    First RAGE then this.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 8 years ago

      This bloat is getting ridiculous. I’ve played engine mods like Darkplaces that have higher resolution textures than any of these games, and yet don’t use up that much space. What are they doing, storing all textures as uncompressed and have a million cut scene videos? I wouldn’t doubt it.

      I’m going to start skipping a lot more games if they don’t cut down the hard drive space. That’s clearly a waste.

      Have any of you played the kkrieger demo? It’s quite possible to make a game without stealing all our hard drive space.

        • CuttinHobo
        • 8 years ago

        Ridiculous bloat? I remember the days when hard drive capacity was a real issue, and certainly when this game wouldn’t have fit on all the space I had across multiple disks. But it’s the 21st century now and you could install this game 50 times on a 1TB disk, which is a pretty typical size for 7200RPM models.

        If you’re talking about SSDs, then being selective about what you install shouldn’t be a foreign idea.

          • l33t-g4m3r
          • 8 years ago

          That’s stupid logic. Do you eat half of your food and throw the rest out just because? Just because they CAN waste our space doesn’t mean they SHOULD. Bloat for the sake of bloat is still bloat, and if it’s possible to cut down on the waste, then they should.

          Hell, even though I have several drives, I still use compression, and it saves me a LOT of space. Today’s programs are unnecessarily wasteful, and bloat this bad actually makes me consider not buying the game. Rage at least has an excuse, what’s the excuse here?

            • CuttinHobo
            • 8 years ago

            For a chuckle, let’s see how Arkham City compares to another popular game for its day – Doom 2, from 1993. I googled its system requirements: 386, 4MB of RAM, *25 MB* of disk space. Arkham City requires 2% of a commonplace disk today… 25MB is 2% of a 1.2GB disk. How many 386s do you think were packin’ that kind of heat? (A second google search finds that computers from 1993 had more like 100-200MB disks.)

            Batman suddenly seems so skinny as to be on the verge of death. Somebody give that man a sandwich with extra gravy!

            Edit: Also, don’t be surprised if its size actually brings a couple benefits. I’d expect game/level load times to be quicker without having to decompress files in order to use them, and higher quality textures by virtue of their more conservative use of lossy compression.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 8 years ago

            I think a terabyte might be exaggerating the size of an average gamer’s harddrive. However, even at 500 gigs and a 600 meg hd circa 1993 I think your point stands.

        • KeillRandor
        • 8 years ago

        Meh. I’m a musician and composer – when they start to sell games on their own HDD you might have cause to worry/complain 😉 (See Native Instruments/EastWest etc..)

        • Chrispy_
        • 8 years ago

        Kkrieger was impressive but it ran like crap because it had to do so much extra work generating all the textures from algorithms.

        That method won’t hold up for a modern game.

    • equivicus
    • 8 years ago

    “Input Devices: 100 per cent Windows XP/Vista or 7 compatible mouse and keyboard ”

    As opposed to those 75% compatible ones.

    • trek205
    • 8 years ago

    Minimum: CPU: Dual-Core CPU 2.4 Ghz

    Recommended: CPU: Dual-Core CPU 2.5 Ghz

    LOL, better oc those old E6600 cpus by 100mhz…

      • PrincipalSkinner
      • 8 years ago

      I got a E2200.

    • ew
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]Quad-speed (4x) DVD-ROM drive[/quote<] Nothing says beefy like a 4x dvd drive!

      • burntham77
      • 8 years ago

      Ha! Optical drive. What am I, installed an OS or ripping a CD? Pfft.

      • Meadows
      • 8 years ago

      It has “quad” in its name!

      • can-a-tuna
      • 8 years ago

      If you have Triple-speed (3x) DVD-ROM drive, you are out of luck with this game.

        • Arclight
        • 8 years ago

        Wait, what happens if i have NO DVD-ROM?

    • Meadows
    • 8 years ago

    [url<]http://penny-arcade.com/comic/2011/10/21[/url<]

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 8 years ago

      I feel like an idiot, but I don’t get this comic at all.

        • yogibbear
        • 8 years ago

        Need to play either this game or the first one.

        • bthylafh
        • 8 years ago

        You’d have to have played Arkham Asylum to get it. Those ? are hidden items and if you find enough you get rewards.

    • Meadows
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]Sound: Microsoft Windows XP/Vista or 7 compatible sound card (100 per cent DirectX 9.0c-compatible)[/quote<] What the crap does "DirectX 9.0c compatible sound" even mean?

      • Malphas
      • 8 years ago

      It means precisely what it says. What don’t you understand exactly?

        • Meadows
        • 8 years ago

        It’s meaningless.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 8 years ago

          A Sound Blaster Pro is not DX9 compatible.

            • Vrock
            • 8 years ago

            Who in the heck would have one of those in 2011?

      • bthylafh
      • 8 years ago

      One suspects it means that the sound card can be run with Microsoft’s generic Win7 driver, at least de facto.

      • Geistbar
      • 8 years ago

      DirectX, as I try to point out often, handles far more than rendering. Sound is one of the things it handles, along with input (and other things too). So “DirectX # compatible” means exactly what you’d expect. Perhaps an easier way to look at it would be if they had said “DirectSound 9.0c compatible”, though I don’t believe the terminology on that would be 100% correct, even if it would “mean” more to most people.

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 8 years ago

      Basically it means that If there’s a windows driver available for it, then it is. Vista/7’s direct sound is completely software based.

      Edit: I see some people are ignorant morons. Doesn’t surprise me.

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