$189 FirePro V4900 goes all in for EyeFinity

Who says professional graphics cards have to be exorbitantly expensive? AMD’s new FirePro V4900 might not have the most pixel-pushing power or the most memory, but it’s priced at just $189 and features hexa-display EyeFinity support.

According to AMD’s product page, the FirePro V4900’s slim, single-slot cooler conceals a GPU with 480 stream processors, a 128-bit memory interface, and 1GB of GDDR5 memory. AMD quotes memory bandwidth of 64GB/s, which hints at a 4 GT/s (or 1000MHz) memory clock speed. The card is supposed to draw less than 75W of power, and the product page suggests both full- and half-height variants are available.

The FirePro V4900 also serves up a couple of DisplayPort 1.2, er, ports as well as a dual-link DVI output. Thanks to its EyeFinity tech, AMD says the card can drive as many as six displays—but that feat will require either DisplayPort 1.2 hubs or DisplayPort 1.2 displays that can be daisy-chained.

The FirePro V4900 should be available today at “select online retailers” for $189. AMD also notes that the card will be offered as part of “select Dell and Fujitsu systems and HP workstations.” The company aims this card at digital-content-creation and computer-aided-design professionals.

Comments closed
    • paulWTAMU
    • 8 years ago

    I’m not as tech literate as the norm here; what’s the difference between the demands posed by gamers and demands posed by professional graphics? Why do they need different sorts of cards?

      • RtFusion
      • 8 years ago

      It’s all about the drivers. Driver sets for us gamers are very different for the workstation crowd. Drivers (and the cards) for the professional market take more to get certified for the various professional 3D/2D app like Maya from Autodesk. And the cards themselves are usually MUCH more expensive.

        • dpaus
        • 8 years ago

        There’s a significant difference in the hardware too, at least potentially. Games require lots of 3D horsepower and texturing (as does AutoCAD and similar products), but most trading/process control/SCADA/public safety applications are 2D (or maybe 2.5D), and largely text-based.

          • Starfalcon
          • 8 years ago

          Plus with a consumer card if it messes up one of the textures or misdraws part of a wireframe it really doesn’t matter. Where as in a CAD wireframe for a new protype that is too be built, that can be extremely bad and expensive if the card makes a rendering error. Pro cards give up speed for accuracy as that is the most important thing.

            • shank15217
            • 8 years ago

            It’s validation, the pro cards and drivers go through a very long validation process with professional cad and 3d rendering software. This drives up the prices for these cards significantly. Many pro applications will not allow regular desktop gfx to accelerate their content because of potential rendering issues.

        • juampa_valve_rde
        • 8 years ago

        Mhh… i smell it would be possible to pick a vanilla 6670 and flash it with the v4900 bios getting exactly the same result.

    • FuturePastNow
    • 8 years ago

    Are DisplayPort 1.2 hubs even on the market yet? Last time I checked, they were vaporware.

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      Kinda makes you wonder why AMD doesn’t make them.

        • willmore
        • 8 years ago

        Given the grief they got over selling branded DRAM, they probably wouldn’t touch this with a ten foot pole.

    • Plazmodeus
    • 8 years ago

    I have a Dell U2711 that is capable of displaying 30bit colour in Photoshop and Lightroom when used with a pro card like this Firepro. I’m always considering a card like this to see how it looks. For $200, its pretty tempting.

      • BlackStar
      • 8 years ago

      As far is image quality is concerned, it’s better to spend this kind of money on a good color calibrator. 10bit is nice, but it won’t do any good if your monitor is uncalibrated.

    • flip-mode
    • 8 years ago

    This card looks pretty awesome for the money. Nvidia’s offerings in this price range seem to be nowhere near the same performance level, but unfortunately Nvidia is always ahead when it comes to software support.

    I have a FirePro V3800 and it [i<]tears[/i<] through video conversion tasks. It'd be neat to see the performance of the 4900 compared to the 4800 and 3800 in that task.

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      [quote<]This card looks pretty awesome for the money[/quote<] ^ This ^ The vast majority of multi-display applications are not gaming; they're used in process control, in public safety, in trading houses, etc. And being able to drive six displays from a $189 card is... phenomenal.

        • MathMan
        • 8 years ago

        True. But the applications you mention are also not cost conscious.

        You mention process control and trading screens: some of the best examples where things NOT working for a couple of hours costs orders of magnitudes more than the difference between a Quadro and a FirePro card.

        Nvidia enjoys the position IBM used to enjoy (and still enjoys in some fields): nobody ever got fired for choosing them.

          • Bauxite
          • 8 years ago

          Its a safe bet some got fired over that laptop debacle.

          • indeego
          • 8 years ago

          I would hope that the N+1 rule applied to anywhere where running equipment was important day-to-day.

            • Anomymous Gerbil
            • 8 years ago

            N+1 on video cards in a trading workstation? No, but we have two PCs under each desk in case anything on one of them fails. (The second PC takes on lighter loads in the normal course of the day, but is good enough to keep things running if the main PC fails, until it is fixed or replaced.)

          • UberGerbil
          • 8 years ago

          While that’s true, there’s a certain chicken-and-eggness to it: since adapters that could drive 4+ screens have always been expensive, the only markets that developed for them were the ones that were fairly price-insensitive. Who knows what niches might be out there?

          • BlackStar
          • 8 years ago

          What nvidia solutions are there that can drive 6 screens on a single card?

          Nvidia is indeed similar to IBM in that they are slowly fading into obscurity. Their market share is but a distant third now and keeps falling. And, like IBM, their solution is to leave the mainstream PC market for (quite profitable) niches, like tablets and GPGPU.

            • Anomymous Gerbil
            • 8 years ago

            IBM, fading into obscurity? Haha… I guess you don’t know much about the IT industry.

          • dpaus
          • 8 years ago

          [quote<]the applications you mention are also not cost conscious[/quote<] Are you kidding?!? Have you heard anything about the economy lately? With the possible exception of Kim Kardashians' divorce lawyers, [i<]everything[/i<] is cost-concious these days.

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