Serious Sam 3 pits pirates against invincible enemy

In the world of big-name PC games, DRM is largely unavoidable. Most copy protection schemes are annoying, some are tolerable, and others just make you laugh. The copy protection built into Serious Sam 3: BFE certainly falls into that third category. Folks who pirate the game will be greeted by a rather special bonus character.

Dubbed the immortal fast scorpion, this enemy appears to strike early in the game. The player is armed only with a pistol at that point, but the scorpion’s invulnerability makes any offense moot. Versus the dual assault rifles wielded by the scorpion, I’m surprised the player in the YouTube video lasted as long as he did.

Serious Sam 3: BFE relies only on Valve’s Steam content delivery platform to make sure players have legit copies of the game. I don’t expect it will take crackers too long to patch the scorpion out of existence, but I’ve gotta hand it to Croteam for making me chuckle in the meantime. Serious Sam 3 costs $40 right now, although it’s only managed to score 71% on Metacritic. To be fair, the game’s user score is much higher at 8.9 out of 10. Don’t ask me why Metacritic uses different scales for its critic and user scores.

Comments closed
    • Aveon
    • 8 years ago

    The Protection saga continues after killing the immortal scorpion.

    Look up in the air , it’s a bird no it’s plane no you got pawned by CROTEAM:

    [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SkK_ogovhk&feature=player_embedded[/url<]

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      LMAO

      Invisible, dropping headless kamikazes……

    • mcnabney
    • 8 years ago

    Dragon Age 2 is a prime example why there should always be a Metacritic player score as well. The professional reviewers, while trying to do a good job, are just too cozy to the developers. That is why DA2 got decent professional reviews, but got trounced by the players. In fact, I am getting a little annoyed at Skyrim (90 hours so far). I have had to use the console three times now to fix broken quests. There are dead dragons all over the place, in places that I never killed one. And you never really develop a connection to the NPCs since they are so generic. It really isn’t as good as their Metacritic score would suggest. Good game, but not that great.

    • Aveon
    • 8 years ago

    they could have been more creative by making the scorpion say
    ” you fckin pirate die die die….”

    • indeego
    • 8 years ago

    The only way to reduce piracy (you’ll never eliminate it) is to offer your product in an easier distribution method and at a reasonable price to your fans/customers.

    Steam does this through pricing(downward), distribution(online), and convenience(games follow your login). iTunes did this through pricing(.99/song), distribution(through iPods) and convenience(click and you have it). The movie/TV studios have not done this well ( silly release windows, high prices, no single source for all movies) and piracy remains high. I can’t blame them because TV/Movies have a very lucrative distribution model that impacts many industries that fight tooth and nail to keep them. They will lose. eBooks are now apparently colluded and will require adjustment, because the prices IMO are still way too high. In China books are way way less and sell hundreds of thousands for noname downloads. Netflix was a step forward but greed stepped in and now people are pirating again due to lack of convenience.

    The more you waste people’s time without giving them what they want, the more you lose potential future customers. Piracy is a problem directly related to pricing/distribution/convenience. Eliminate these barriers.

    As for this, while it is cute, I wonder if SS had just lowered its price in the first place if there would be a need? Why pirate when $10 is readily affordable to most people wanting to play this game. Shock your customer-base!

      • AGerbilWithAFootInTheGrav
      • 8 years ago

      Yes, but why would developers be selling themselves short. Skyrim, MW3, BF3 are all 60$ games. SS3 is 40$, that is 50% less to start with. Why should they sell for 10$ if there is an audience that will pay the full price?

        • yogibbear
        • 8 years ago

        It’s 33% less and it costs 50% more than SS3 to buy Skyrim/MW3/BF3….

          • AGerbilWithAFootInTheGrav
          • 8 years ago

          ๐Ÿ™‚

          point taken

      • w4rrior
      • 8 years ago

      I agree wholly with your post, but I’m not sure what the correct price point for a game is/should be.

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        Lower than what it is now. ๐Ÿ˜‰

        I think publishers know this, hence why discounts are occurring earlier and earlier every year. Portal 2 was dropped even faster than I predicted. I think that trend will continue.

    • AGerbilWithAFootInTheGrav
    • 8 years ago

    This guy played on tourist level, which is the lowest one with 200 health and regenerating health (both of those disappear as you get to normal and higher difficulty levels).

    People who actually play the game love it… that is the difference between the reviewer average and user one.

    Not at all reveiwers play the whole game, as most of complaints in poor reviews are down for … well not playing the game all the way, as if they did they could not complain about it (ie some were complaining about the lack of destruictible environments while you can flatten whole levels while playing, or looking too much like COD, while only first three short levels are in that direction and similar)…

    While on topic here, SS3 has the best/most versatile PC settings options from any modern game, when can we see a TR Serious Sam 3 gfx performance article?

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      Because, SS3 is a big throwback to SS: First Encounter.

      The only difference is that they have to reload your weapon constantly (making the game harder). ๐Ÿ˜‰

      SS has always been about dealing with waves of ambushes in waltz of strafing, bunny-hopping and hoping that you can kill enough of the baddies before they overwhelm you.

        • AGerbilWithAFootInTheGrav
        • 8 years ago

        Well I agree – it still is, and it is still a blast.

    • odizzido
    • 8 years ago

    That scorpion is great for hardcore gamers. You need to pass the game with that scorpion on your ass the whole time.

    • Buzzard44
    • 8 years ago

    Hadn’t even thought of ever playing Serious Sam 3 before, but now I’m definitely going to pirate it!

    I’m sure it’s a good game and all, but honestly, fighting against an invincible scorpion sounds way more fun to me than actually playing the game.

      • stmok
      • 8 years ago

      And it is that very attitude of self-entitlement, justification, and excuses that have resulted in the PC gaming industry treating their audience…

      * …Like 2nd class citizens.
      => Lower graphical quality console port like in Modern Warfare 2.
      => Be put on lower priority (delayed) release against their console versions.

      * …With disdain.
      => Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Future Soldier is CANCELED for the PC.
      ([b<]Are you happy now?[/b<]) * ...With avoidance. => No Metal Gear Solid 3 and 4 on PC. (Why would Konami bother any more after paying third-parties to do ports of the first two on the PC, when its going to be pirated with such ease?) No wonder why most well-known developers would rather absorb Microsoft, Sony, or online distribution company taking a cut from their profits! Its better to make [b<]some money[/b<], than [b<]no money[/b<] at all for the hard work you do. Keep pirating, then watch all the high production developers go to consoles. You'd be left with independent developers. Long term? PC gaming production quality will fall, and you will look back and cherish the good old days when gaming on the desktop computer was more vibrant. There used to be a good agreement with PC gaming in the past: They make games, you pay them, they make better games and enjoy doing it. You enjoy their better games. With the advent of the entitlement attitude in recent years, there's little to gain with PC game development. (Other than to start your career on it; in order to get your skills and experience. Then you dump it in favour of console development. Its easier to develop for a standardised platform like a console than it is to mess around with infinite variations of PC configurations. Lower debugging and quality testing costs.) With the engineering/mathematical/problem-solving skills one develops with modern day game development, one might as well switch careers to mech, aero, etc engineering and work on something that can't be copied/shared on-line.

        • Buzzard44
        • 8 years ago

        I’m really puzzled by your pious post and other people’s negative reaction.

        If anyone read the article, they’d know that I’m not even effectively pirating the game – I’m just fighting a scorpion.

        If there was no scorpion, I wouldn’t pirate the game. I’m really not interested in playing Serious Sam, and never have been. I want to fight an invincible scorpion for fun.

        Geez Louise, calm down people.

    • Geistbar
    • 8 years ago

    Implementing copy protection like this typically sounds great on paper, but as implemented it tends to be very flawed. For one, once this outcome is discovered, the cracking groups will just go back to work and find a work around- in this case, they could probably find the monster’s data file, and edit it so it does 0 damage, is permanently in no-clip mode, mute all of its sounds, and is invisible, or just set it to have constant negative health regeneration so it dies on it’s own, or a dozen other possibilities… People have mentioned Arkham Asylum having a similar protection method, but as far as I know that is fully piratable.

    Another issue that tends to happen with this, is that if you don’t make the fact that it’s targeting pirates very, very, very obvious (a pink monster isn’t obvious enough, it’d need to be holding up a sign saying “YARR! Pirate Scum!” or something), it will end up creating bad word of mouth for the game. This happened with Titan Quest- I don’t remember what specifically they did to make the game break for pirates, but it ended up causing pirates to tell their friends and leave opinions online that stated the game was too buggy to play.

    The last big issue is that no matter how hard they try, there will almost always be some false positives. Creating a system where some of your paying customers get a broken product that the pirates will eventually find a work-around for is just foolish. A good system can minimize the false positives quite a bit, but even if only one paying customer encounters this- you’ve probably created a pirate out of them, due to their negative experience.

    All the same, it is pretty amusing for them to do.

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    I don’t understand why developers keep spending and putting in DRM.

    It is clearly cost-ineffective and only damages their PR with legit customers to have to deal with teething issues with any DRM scheme.

    The best way to combat casual piracy is to make it economically impractical. The best method is doing is making your product worth the “$49+ price tag” that you demand for it. If the market feels that your product isn’t worth $49+ price point and you are going to get a no-sale, until you reduce the price.

    • evilpaul
    • 8 years ago

    Arkham Asylum had a similar thing with the bat cape or something not working in the pirated version.

    • axeman
    • 8 years ago

    A couple of observations:

    – games are cheap now, they’ve pretty much stayed the course on price for years and years while the purchasing price of your money has gone steadily down
    – most of it’s crap though because they’re rehashes with better graphics – lipstick on a pig, so I don’t know if we’re really getting a better deal
    – don’t expect much to change – the investment they put into all those fancy graphics is huge money these days – it means the publishers will always be trying to figure out the magic bullet to defeat the pirates

    I terrible engilsh

    – oh yes, and complaining about DRM is so old, GFWL is so much worse and has nothing to do with DRM does it?

      • Yeats
      • 8 years ago

      [quote<]- games are cheap now, they've pretty much stayed the course on price for years and years while the purchasing price of your money has gone steadily down[/quote<] They are? Top-level titles are typically $50-60, $10 more than just 2 years ago. COD:MW3, for example, is $10 more than it's predecessor.

      • Madman
      • 8 years ago

      “games are cheap now, they’ve pretty much stayed the course on price for years and years while the purchasing price of your money has gone steadily down” Reaaly now? In Europe crappy, buggy un-patched game goes around 80USD, with 8 (max) hours of single player experience and very crappy re-playability value, as most of the stuff is stupid scripted cinematic…

      With few exceptions I find GOG a lot better value for money. BG/BG2, NWN, HOMM3 etc, they could take weeks to finish, and were not that expensive. And now you can get them for 5 bucks.

      I wish companies would release source code for 10 year old games, it would be possible to adjust it for full HD screens, while the publishers would still get the money through selling the core assets. Like for Quake, Doom3 etc.

    • DrDillyBar
    • 8 years ago

    That’s Epic!

    • C-A_99
    • 8 years ago

    Crysis 2 sort of did this, but instead simply made the game unplayably buggy.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 8 years ago

      didn’t that affect paying customers as well?

        • kilkennycat
        • 8 years ago

        No bugs witnessed here with Crysis 2 campaign (purchased copy).

        • Bensam123
        • 8 years ago

        I think that was intended to be the joke…

          • derFunkenstein
          • 8 years ago

          Need some auto-tune for my sense of humor. ๐Ÿ™

            • Geistbar
            • 8 years ago

            Did you try degaussing it? If you haven’t updated to the newer humor systems you need to degauss them every couple of months.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            I agree… humor rotates on a seasonal pattern, you have to degauss every now and then.

      • C-A_99
      • 8 years ago

      Well here’s what happened. I tried one crack and the game couldn’t load any saves. Tried another that could load saves and then the HUD/screen effects, etc. would randomly become incredibly buggy. (i.e. as if the nanosuit was constantly being disrupted by EMP.) Finally, I activated it with a legit key and it worked just fine.

      It’s still just a game of cat and mouse really. I think they’re trying to go on the fact that people who release cracks never bother to test them, so they try to annoy the hell out of everyone who pirates. It’s an interesting new strategy to say the least.

      Not sure on false positives nor successful cracks, at least as far as that particular game goes.

      That said, best method of combating piracy is still simply making it not worth pirating. (i.e. Super-Steam sales.)

    • Kaleid
    • 8 years ago

    I was going to buy this but then I took an arrow in the knee.

    • LiquidSpace
    • 8 years ago

    what’s a serious sam 3 ?

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 8 years ago

    SS3 is not a proper sequel. Their slogan about no cover is a lie. The majority of the enemies hit scan, making cover a necessity. The alien ship boss levels are really annoying, as you have to look up and shoot the teleporter beams while kamikazes, werebulls, kleers, scorpions, etc attack you from the sides.

    People complained about doom3’s monster placement, well SS3 is a million times worse. Near infinite random spawning, and I believe in some areas it doesn’t stop until you progress to a certain point.
    [url<]http://www.gamesradar.com/serious-sam-3-bfe-review/[/url<] [quote<]Look, we understand this game is about throwing insane amounts of enemies at you, but the pacing is all out of whack in a number of places. Itโ€™s often lacking in proper lulls and crescendos: youโ€™ll encounter a huge swarm, itโ€™s super intense, and then you clear it out. Great! But then a few random stragglers follow up. Then a few more stragglers. A few more. More. Holy crap, when does this pointless, challenge-free trickle end? Sometimes it might be as many as ten to fifteen โ€œwavesโ€ of tiny handfuls of enemies that serve no purpose other than to keep you from progressing to the next part of the level. This structure pads out the game way beyond the length it should be โ€“ it can take nearly two hours to get through a level that has a layout of space that would take twenty minutes in any other shooter.[/quote<] Not a lot of color or new environments: [quote<]Similarly, while Serious 2 took us to all kinds of lush and colorful environments, BFE returns to Egypt and just lingers there like an unwanted party crasher. The ENTIRE game is a series of brown textures โ€“ sand, brick buildings, and so many brown Egyptian ruins that playing this game may make you forget there are any other colors in the rainbow (hey, brownโ€™s in the rainbow, right?).[/quote<] Oh, and certain weapons like the laser gun and rifle are secret only. That includes ammo. The cake is a lie. (trailer) Also, most secrets are just finding a random wall to jump over, which can be annoying. Reloading the Shotgun / rifle are also disappointments, especially after the game starts waving you with enemies. I honestly enjoyed SS2 more than 3, which isn't saying much. SS2 at least had the basic gameplay down. Both were terrible sequels. You can attempt to look past all the issues, but that's gonna be fairly difficult, since the first levels are complete garbage, and it doesn't really pick up until you get the minigun. Then the infinite waves issue pops up. You almost have to be a masochist to enjoy this game.

      • bcronce
      • 8 years ago

      Which ironically is part of SS3’s glamour. Fun game ๐Ÿ™‚

      There’s not a lot of room for these types of games, but they pull it off well.

      • AGerbilWithAFootInTheGrav
      • 8 years ago

      like most of us are masochist… that Gamesradar guy did not even play the game… here is another review which is a lot more appropriate, and it is even a video so it is easy to see the gameplay which you consider “masochist”.

      [url<]http://youtu.be/IsApdYQdyEs[/url<] edit: also to add one more from Ben Kuchera (Ars) in text [url<]http://arstechnica.com/gaming/reviews/2011/12/serious-sam-3-is-hardcore-difficult-and-lovely.ars[/url<]

    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    Well this is great except it falls into the same category of being grossfully painful for people who legitimately purchased the game, but still have to fight this thing. Ohhh false-positives effect immortal pink scorpion too!

    PS Iโ€™m more concerned about people who think they can actually hurt it, let alone kill it. Why would an immortal scorpion designed to disrupt and screw over hackers actually have hit points?

      • bthylafh
      • 8 years ago

      Did your self-righteousness make you forget that this only shows up when you’ve pirated the game?

      Read that again: this doesn’t happen if you’ve legitimately bought the game.

        • cynan
        • 8 years ago

        I think he was referring to those gray areas where people have legitimately paid for it, but then choose to play a pirated version.

        For example, I actually did this with Dragon age: Awakening. I bought it on Origin, but then had an issue getting the Origin download to work (though I didn’t try very hard) and simply installed a pirated version because it was simpler. Was it illegal for me to play the pirated version when I had technically paid for a legitimate license? I don’t know, you tell me.

          • Bensam123
          • 8 years ago

          Yes.

            • Meadows
            • 8 years ago

            No.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            vgd

            • Geistbar
            • 8 years ago

            Maybe so?

        • Geistbar
        • 8 years ago

        They specifically mentioned false positives- it’s entirely possibly (I’d argue that it’s even [i<]likely[/i<]) that at least one person who legitimately purchased the game will be affected by this. Maybe whatever code they use to detect a pirated copy is flawed, maybe their copy installed oddly, maybe it only detects changes in the hash of certain files, and they edited a .ini file- it's generally impossible to prevent false positives in situations like this. Edit: Minor clarification.

          • Bensam123
          • 8 years ago

          And also yes.

    • blitzy
    • 8 years ago

    what happens when you enable godmode? lol

    • glacius555
    • 8 years ago

    I have six arrows for sale..

    • AlvinTheNerd
    • 8 years ago

    So let me get this straight.

    I pirate a game and because I did you are going to punish me in such a way that I put down the game and stop playing it. After that point I would probably never take a second look at buying any serious sam game at any point in the future.

    When I was in 60k of student debt, I pirated. I am not saying it was justified or right in any mannor, but it did happen. And it is happening now with many other people. Now that I have a gaming budget, I buy quite a few games and most of them are similar if not the same franchises that I pirated. The only redeeming factor for game makers is that piracy builds a fan base.

    This DRM like most others is punishing the fans. There are too many options out there. Ruining the fan base is going to ruin your franchise. Proper DRM is rewarding the buyers, not with new gimmicks but with service. Mojang and Valve do this very well and very successfully.

    EDIT: Wow, a former pirate that is buying games now and is still treated like crap. Believe what you want, but piracy is going to happen and you can do things to get sales out of it or you can do things to prevent new sales. I am telling you what has to happen if you want people to become former pirates.

      • Meadows
      • 8 years ago

      You failed to get this straight.

      • ludi
      • 8 years ago

      This tripwire was fashioned [i<]exactly[/i<] for people like you. The rest of us won't have to deal with a ridiculously overwrought DRM scheme that punishes all of the people who did pay for the game, which is exactly how things should be.

      • bthylafh
      • 8 years ago

      PROTIP: Don’t whine when you’re stopped from taking what’s not yours.

      • DarkUltra
      • 8 years ago

      I think you may be right, despite of your low rating. I remember the trees stopped growing in Settlers 2 (or was it 3?) and I thought it was a bug and never played the game again, much less bought it or any sequels.

      You have a good point and shouldn’t be rated down (good argument no trolling or flaming). Except the usual piracy-is-ok-cus-im-a-student argument; buy less beer and other crap so you can afford more games while you’re a student.

        • SPOOFE
        • 8 years ago

        [quote<]You have a good point[/quote<] No he doesn't. If he pirates a game, devs/pubs have every reason to suspect he'll pirate more, and so they can't "lose a sale" because they never had one to begin with. Everything you do establishes something about yourself. If you don't want to be treated like a thief, stop thieving.

          • willyolio
          • 8 years ago

          and they’re not even treating him like a thief. they’re letting him play the pirated game as an extended demo.

          the fact that he’s never going to play the game again because can’t pass a certain level on a pirate copy… and he actually still has the balls to call himself a “fan”? lol.

          • Malphas
          • 8 years ago

          If you think everyone that ever pirates a game has never bought or will never buy a game again, then you’re even more stupid than the pro-DRM crowd. I thought this was amusing, it’s a very old-school method of copyright protection; but ultimately developers need to create incentives that make people want to buy a game, rather than ham-fisted protection schemes.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            Yup… that’s like saying people who play f2p games and don’t ever buy anything are pirates and should be penalized for it.

            (think carefully about this example before replying with it’s nothing like that).

          • LiquidSpace
          • 8 years ago

          Dude, I used pirate games like 5 years ago when when I was a student; but now I have more than 60 games in my steam library and 3 games in my origin library including BF3.

          • Meadows
          • 8 years ago

          You lost at the point where you said “thief”.

            • DrDillyBar
            • 8 years ago

            ๐Ÿ™‚ [url=http://www.knowaguy.com/tag/steal/<]Theft[/url<]

          • Bensam123
          • 8 years ago

          You make it sound as if pirates can never and never will buy a product…

        • cynan
        • 8 years ago

        I agree that the OP has a point. I just don’t think you can realistically expect a game studio to be in any sort of position to view pirates as a potential future paying customers. Try rationalizing that to your share holders.

        Where the OP lost me is his point about how this DRM scheme is punishing fans. Sure it may be true, but it’s a moot point: As stated in the above paragraph, it is ridiculous to expect game studios to treat pirates like anything other than people who are electing not to pay for their product.

        Yes, they may be shooting themselves in the foot if fans who might buy future games think that the scorpion character is a bug, but I don’t this is as likely to be misconstrued as what you described for Settlers. I guess they could always dress this Scorpion character up in a pirate outfit or something, but by and large, I think their way of addressing piracy is at least creative and somewhat entertaining – which is better than what can be said for any DRM scheme.

        [i<]Edit:[/i<] And yes, this will almost surely be remedied in a new pirate release within a couple of weeks, if not already

      • tejas84
      • 8 years ago

      I have student debt and did not resort to piracy…

      You are a thieving criminal and should be locked up. I think you need to get THAT straight in your head.

      sheesh no wonder developers hate the pc with douchebags like you pirating left right and center

        • bcronce
        • 8 years ago

        nah, nothing that bad.

        He got what he paid for, I got what I paid for, we’re all square.

        • clone
        • 8 years ago

        stealing a video game should not lead to anyone being “locked up” on the taxpayers tab.

        they should be charged and fined AKA forced to pay quite a bit more than the game would have cost, for a thief it should be a part of the cost of doing business AKA stealing.

          • Yeats
          • 8 years ago

          I don’t think “AKA” means what you think it means.

            • clone
            • 8 years ago

            I know you criticize what confuses you.

        • Yeats
        • 8 years ago

        Yes, let’s jail all the petty criminals. After all, the American taxpayers would just love to pay thousands of $$ a month for each person locked up for $50 theft.

          • Shambles
          • 8 years ago

          Derp, piracy =/ theft. Going back to playing Skyrim on steam now.

            • Yeats
            • 8 years ago

            *Sigh* not that old, tired argument again. Piracy and theft are first cousins, at the very least.

            People still say “derp”? Really? Or just the no-lifers caught in a loop of South Park reruns?

            • Malphas
            • 8 years ago

            It’s actually an old tired response to an old tired mistruth. Can’t we all just finally agree that piracy isn’t stealing, it’s copyright infringement, which is a separate and distinct action. It’s different practically, it’s different legally, and it’s different morally. You can argue it’s just as bad as stealing if you want, but just saying “piracy = theft” is stupid, lazy and blatantly incorrect.

        • Forge
        • 8 years ago

        Jesus. Get some perspective, and then maybe some fresh air.

      • Bensam123
      • 8 years ago

      Nah, he definitely has correct logic. It doesn’t matter what is right in the developers eyes, it’s what people see through their eyes. Someone who pirates the game wont know this isn’t part of the normal game and they’ll just think it sucks, that effectively kills off any intrinsic benefit for pirates (who may turn into potential customers).

      Don’t rate him down because he holds an unpopular belief. It’s always nice to think a system is righteous and that it punishes those that deserve it, it doesn’t always work that way though.

      • LiquidSpace
      • 8 years ago

      I totally agree with AlvinTheNerd.

      • clone
      • 8 years ago

      Alvin the Nerd you stole games until you could afford to buy games, did you go back and buy the games you stole paying full price for them because if you didn’t you don’t matter to the company you steal from.

      2ndly you are using the web and like all who use the web if you encountered the unstoppable scorpion you would spend some time doing a search to find out why/where it came from and then realize you are facing it because you stole the game, you might cry about that but then again you stole the game and as a thief you don’t matter.

      I hope the Croteam does a good job of stopping hackers from bypassing the scorpion & and think it’s a great idea.

      lastly I loved the sound of that pistol.

        • AlvinTheNerd
        • 8 years ago

        I did not pirate this game and I haven’t played it nor any Serious Sam game. I was placing a hypothetical from my perspective of a former pirate.

        As for the games I did pirate, I ended up buying quite a few on steam. I wish I could say my conscience overcame me and I purchased them out of guilt. The reality is that I bought them on steam because it was easy. It put them on all the computers I now own and syncs the data. I probably would not have played them again, but steam made it easier to go back and enjoy them.

        I will not argue that pirating was justified. I know I could have cut something else if I really wanted the game. I can put as many excuses on here as possible, but it wasn’t justified.

        What I am arguing is that, right or wrong, piracy happens for a lot of reasons. There are very few pirates that have never bought or will never buy games again and there is a way you can handle that to increase sales.

        In the end, its their game and they can do with it what they want. I find what they are doing as short sited but I have my own money and I can do or not do with it what I want too.

          • clone
          • 8 years ago

          1st: AlvinTheNerd I know.
          2nd: when you bought the games on Steam did you pay the $50 + asking price at launch or did you pay the later much reduced amount? (rhetorical) my point all along is that you didn’t pay full price, paying $3.99 – $9.99 on special a year later is nothing.
          3rd: you are correct.
          4th: invasive DRM hasn’t always been the case, invasive and more notably almost belligerent DRM is due to ongoing rampant theft, Croteam’s response is so much more interesting, I believe they did a good thing & any pirate that can’t hack past the Scorpion will probably laugh about it because it’s all a game.

          I played Serious Sam 2 and while the Co operative modes were really good… the enemies became so silly the challenge became pointless & hollow, had Doom 3 included co op it would’ve been hilarious to hear one another jump out of their seats, had Half Life 2 been co op it would have been even better than it was.

      • Forge
      • 8 years ago

      No, no, no, anyone that downloaded it already will wait a few days and download the PROPER’ed crackfix. I highly doubt people are deleting/forgetting over this.

      It *is* quite clever, though. I had no interest in Sam3 before, but this got my attention. Kudos, Croteam!

      • ET3D
      • 8 years ago

      I agree that it should have been made clear that this is an anti-piracy measure. This way if any legitimate buyers get this they’d know they need to call support, and pirates will know it’s not a normal part of the game.

      • --k
      • 8 years ago

      As someone who has worked in the game development industry before, there are 2 types of types of consumers; those that have a conscience and buy, and those that are selfish and promise to buy if only, etc. Piracy is something that has been around for decades and isn’t going away because of the impassioned arguments posted on forums. Greed and selfishness are in some ways part of the American dream. In our pursuit of happiness we take and exploit where we see fit. Capitalism rests on the getting the most output for the least input. If there is away to acquire something of value that doesn’t require payment then why not exploit it? I’m playing devil’s advocate of course.

      • yogibbear
      • 8 years ago

      Go die in a hole you not-paying-for-your-games dirty scum. Because of you *cough* used games market *cough* I have to deal with Securom/GfWL/Limited Activations/Delayed Ports/etc.

      • cphite
      • 8 years ago

      You are the reason that those of us who actually pay for our games have to deal with DRM.

      And no, it doesn’t matter than you only “used to” steal. You stole, and in the process – along with a lot of others – encourage gaming companies to place intrusive, annoying anti-piracy features onto their software.

      The fact that you were in debt…. Boo hoo. Debt isn’t an excuse for stealing a game.

      Imagine someone using your argument for a car… “I used to steal cars – but don’t blame me, I just couldn’t afford to buy one and, you know, I really wanted one… but now I have a budget and I don’t steal them anymore. And you know, instead of putting locks on cars and requiring the use of keys to start the engine, car companies should just add extra features – maybe a better sound system – for legitimate buyers.”

        • ludi
        • 8 years ago

        In economics terms, a car is excludable and rivalrous. It doesn’t make a great analogy for software piracy because the pirated copy doesn’t actually prevent anyone else from using the game concurrently.

        IOW there are better arguments to be made.

          • cphite
          • 8 years ago

          He is attempting to argue that rather than even attempt stopping the thieves, software companies should simply accept thievery as a given and focus more on rewarding people who actually follow the rules. That’s the analogy.

          Regardless of whether or not something is excludable and rivalrous; if you take something without paying for it, you’re stealing it. Period. And the blame for that theft falls on the person doing the stealing; NOT on the software company, or the store, or society at large. We are each responsible for our own actions.

    • TurtlePerson2
    • 8 years ago

    I’ve never had much belief in user scores for new releases. People tend to either vote positive if they bought it because to do otherwise would be to admit that they’re stupid, or they vote negative if they didn’t buy it because they’re upset with something about the game.

    Also, it’s a lot cheaper to hire spammers to vote a score up than to pay reviewers to vote the game up. As much as we might not trust critics, the user scores are even easier to game.

      • cynan
      • 8 years ago

      You are right. The only caveat is when here are orders of magnitude more user ratings than critic reviews. In such a case the user ratings gain utility.

      • --k
      • 8 years ago

      I found that out yesterday. I sorted “best game of all time” by metascore, and found the results mostly agreeable. Then I sorted by reader score, and found the list to be filled with forgettable/anonymous titles near the top.

        • yogibbear
        • 8 years ago

        If you went sort by user score & > 1000 votes, it’d be much more accurate.

      • Geistbar
      • 8 years ago

      I agree that user scores tend to be very problematic. They aren’t really any worse than reviewer scores though. Reviewers seem to score based off of the hype preceding a game, with little-no consideration for how good the game ended up being- just look at the average rating of Spore, Empire:Total War, Civilization V, or Black & White- all very hyped games before release, met with wonderfully high scores from reviewers, then derided by users as some form of horrendously not fun. In contrast, at least two of my favorite games got stuck in the 70s metascore- Fire Emblem Radiant Dawn & Alpha Protocol.

      I’d say the reliability of users and reviewers are equally spotty, overall- and users only when it’s such an overwhelmingly anonymous system as choosing a number out of 10 and calling it a day.

      The only reviews that are worth anything these days are by smaller groups, or by finding multiple people who like the same games as you- if you find enough, it’s likely at least one of them will play a game you’re interested in to tell you what it’s like.

    • I.S.T.
    • 8 years ago

    I own this, yet I am tempted to download it simply to see if I can beat the scorpion somehow…

      • matnath1
      • 8 years ago

      If the game can detect a pirate why not set up the code so the game simply crashes?

    • entropy13
    • 8 years ago

    Disappointing. I thought there were pirates in the game fighting against invisible enemies…ninjas.

      • Meadows
      • 8 years ago

      That was my first reading, too.

      • mikehodges2
      • 8 years ago

      Definitely, should have been an immortal pirate!

        • khands
        • 8 years ago

        If I ever made a badass enemy DRM schema it would definitely have to be either a pirate or a ninja.

          • entropy13
          • 8 years ago

          Pirate Zombie Cyborg Werewolf v. Ninja Alien Robot T. Rex?

            • yogibbear
            • 8 years ago

            If I tossed a coin to decide the outcome of that one it would most certainly land on its side.

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