Intel demos Medfield phone, tablet prototypes

Next year, Intel will release Medfield, and we’ll see the first x86 phones and tablets competitive with ARM-based designs—at least, that’s what Intel has been promising for the past little while. However, MIT’s Technology Review posted a hands-on preview of reference Medfield tablets and phones earlier this morning, and what it says sounds encouraging.

According to Technology Review, Intel’s Medfield reference phone is "similar in dimensions to the iPhone 4 but noticeably lighter." The Android 2.3-powered device is capable of streaming high-definition video to a TV, can snap a burst of ten eight-megapixel photos in quick succession, and purportedly enables "smooth and fast" web browsing. Intel is reportedly using the handset to try and convince handset makers to adopt Medfield.

The reference tablet, meanwhile, runs the newer Android 4.0 release. Technology Review says that device is about the same size and weight as Apple’s iPad 2, albeit with a bigger screen, and is "noticeably nicer to use" than today’s Android tablets.

Technology Review’s hands-on experience doesn’t tell us about battery life or cost, two things that could make or break future Medfield tablets and phones. If Intel manages to be competitive all around, though, then perhaps next year could indeed be the year of x86 handhelds.

Comments closed
    • JLW777
    • 9 years ago
    • JLW777
    • 9 years ago

    5 years later, Intel gains most market share due to superior products and u get a certain group of self righteous ppl whom will still buy inferior product claiming it can protect the masses(mainstream consumer who doesn’t care or know) from monopoly intel prices. sound familiar? xD

    • CuttinHobo
    • 9 years ago

    I’d genuinely appreciate a well thought-out response. I’m not trying to stir the pot “for the lulz”.

    Since there are half a dozen threads where I’d like to pose this question, I’ll just ask here: What’s with this “the evil ARM monopoly is milking the world with their obscene licensing fees!!!!” sentiment? For Q3 of 2011, ARM’s total revenue was $192 *million*. If their fees are so unbearable then how do they have so little cash flow? Intel’s Q3 revenue was over $14 billion. If you’re so worried about price gouging, why are you giving ARM the stink-eye? Merely having a monopoly is not reason enough to hate ARM – or Intel.

    I don’t get how the current situation of fierce competition between a number of ARM licensees is *worse* than the PC market. Both markets have, for all intents and purposes, an ISA monopoly. But Intel doesn’t license x86 at all (other than the two companies that have had licenses forever), is utterly dominating, and feels no real competition except in the lowest-margin markets. And don’t try to trump-up AMD as a credible threat to Intel. I’ll be very pleasantly surprised if they’re more than a niche player in the CPU market in 5 years.

    I don’t hate Intel. I have three desktops and a laptop in this house and they all have Intel inside. I just want competition, and we have plenty of that in the mobile space. Once Intel gets in there – and it’s inevitable – you know it won’t take long for the competition to thin out. There aren’t many pockets as deep as Intel’s.

      • Beelzebubba9
      • 9 years ago

      If anything, having everything run on ARM’s ISAs increases competition because it means device manufacturers can move from one vendor to another with far lower costs to port their software. Unlike PCs which are basically stuck on Wintel until the platform dies at this point.

      Viva La ARM, I say.

      • shank15217
      • 9 years ago

      Apple’s pockets go pretty deep last i checked. Intel has a much tougher fight in the tablet space even from AMD.

        • CuttinHobo
        • 9 years ago

        Ah, that’s a good point. I hadn’t thought of Apple and Intel butting heads in this fight. But now that you mention it, I could see it happening. Apple has put a good chunk of change into ARM development and bringing it in-house. They want full control over their destiny.

        Looking beyond tablets – I’m sure Apple will eventually want to have the whole product line-up using the same instruction set. And since the ability to dual-boot Windows is fairly important for Macs, Windows 8 on ARM keeps them in the loop.

          • NeelyCam
          • 9 years ago

          I think your original post was directed at me, right..? It was a beautiful post – a prime example of how to defuse my trolling. And yes – complaining about ARM monopoly is mostly trolling against those who are anti-Intel because of its supposed monopoly, but somehow blindly think ARM monopoly is a good thing. I’m mainly calling them out on this double standard in my trollish ways…

          ARM does have a monopoly, but as you and others have mentioned, they aren’t wielding that monopoly to make huge profits.. yet. If you look at ARM P/E (>7000… I can barely wait for the moment when I can say “over 8000!), though, it’s pretty clear their shareholders are expecting significantly (some 500 times) higher profits in the future. ARM can’t really hope to do that unless they abuse their mobile monopoly, or if they make huge profits in the PC market – the latter being unlikely because of Intel’s dominant position.

          So, that leaves the mobile space. Think about it – is there anything at the moment that would prevent ARM to suddenly decide to charge 20% royalties on all A15-based chips (and an extra +5% for each extra core beyond the first two)? What would Qualcomm/NVidia/Apple do? They don’t really have any options but to pay the piper (or stay with their current contracts on A9). Of course, they want their own profits, too, so they’ll charge OEMs more for these chips. The so called “competition” doesn’t really affect pricing here, since [i<]every[/i<] chip available to an OEM has this extra royalty cost attached to it... OEMs can't just get one without it. So they'll pay. OEMs pass the cost along to the consumers who, similarly, don't have any non-ARM options. Every smartphone will have that ARM royalty cost attached to it. So, they pay. One can argue that "it's only pennies". But what if it becomes tens of pennies? Dollars? Tens of dollars? Of course this is a hypothetical scenario - if the royalties go up too much, mobile chip vendors will stay with previous-gen tech (A9), or other ISAs will jump in (MIPS). But don't fool yourself - ARM wants to make money, and they [i<]will[/i<] try to make the royalties creep up as much as possible without a huge backlash or losing the business to another architecture. This is where x86 steps in - at the moment, it really is the [i<]only[/i<] reason why ARM can't abuse its monopoly. It's a [b<]good[/b<] thing that Intel is entering this market. Those who say that "Intel will just cheat and abuse" are shortsighted and wrong; Intel is [b<]not[/b<] in the position to cheat and abuse in the mobile market... but it [b<]is[/b<] in the position to prevent ARM from doing that. Don't get me wrong; I don't think Intel is pure and good. Intel is driven by the same greed as all the other companies.. it's just that in the mobile space, that greed helps consumers. Mind you, in the PC business it hurts consumers [b<]hugely[/b<], because there Intel is in a clear position to wield the Monopoly Mace if it so wishes... especially now that AMD has imploded. And also, don't think for a second that I don't want ARM to succeed in the PC space.. we need someone to challenge Intel there. But what I want to happen and what I think will happen are two different things.

            • CuttinHobo
            • 9 years ago

            Thank you, this is exactly the kind of response I was hoping for.

            You’re absolutely right that ARM is in a position where they could jack the royalties way up – but I think that if that was the plan, they already would have. They’ve had plenty of opportunity through the smartphone (and now tablet) revolution, but that window is closing. Also, my impression is that with the right type of license you’re able to make whatever changes you want, or even design from scratch. It may be that the only thing standing between a previous-gen licensee and the latest advances is the engineering expertise to do it themselves.

            But, speaking for myself, the royalty facet of this situation is secondary… my primary concern is with keeping innovation alive. It’s true that while competition is fierce, it’s within the boundaries of one architecture – a storm in a bottle. Naturally, my fear is that this incoming behemoth just destroys the whole bottle. Before Shank mentioned Apple as ARM’s potential knight in shining armor (typing that caused me to throw up a little in my mouth), I hadn’t considered any of the players being stubborn enough to go toe-to-toe with Intel. Samsung, for example, has resources coming out of its collective ears; but has so much on its plate already that they wouldn’t have the appetite for it. I’d expect most to just sell their design groups (to Apple) while they’re still worth something, rather than get into an ARMs race (oh, HO! *slaps knee*) with a deep-pocketed and focused competitor who just happens to run the best fabs in the world.

          • NeelyCam
          • 9 years ago

          Oh, and Apple vs. Intel: both have deep pockets. Apple’s are deeper, but they are still limited by what process options they have. Apple most definitely would want to fab their A6, A7 and beyond at Intel fabs, but I think Intel is protecting their x86 by making those fabs available only for x86-based chips.

          I have a feeling that there are some negotiations going on between the two companies on just that, but neither wants to give up: Apple wants full control of the chip design, while Intel doesn’t want ARM chips coming out of their fabs. I think if Intel manages to demonstrate that x86 is power-efficient in mobile power envelopes, and lets Apple design anything and everything on that chip with the caveat that the core has to be x86, there is potential for a compromise, especially now that the RDF generator is gone.

          Meanwhile, Apple is going with the second best thing, Samsung… but getting more and more anxious about Samsung also being a direct competitor.

          Oh, and Win8 on ARM is Win8-. Without x86, Win8 is a bit of a cripple, and nowhere near capable of the dual-boot Macs (with x86 chips) have.

          • Pancake
          • 9 years ago

          I seriously doubt if you’ll be able to go to your local shop (or internet site), download “Windows 8 Arm Edition” and install that on your tablet.

          It’d be nice thing to be able to do though and I can only hope the ARM ecosystem creates a widely used standard boot firmware like we have with PCs.

      • sschaem
      • 9 years ago

      192 million just for allowing people to use their IP (over 3 month). Thats almost 1 billion a year in just licensing fee.

      Only one control the entire ARM market, and its ARMH. Samsung and the rest compete at gluing various part together on the same architecture.

      Dont beleive me?

      What is Apple A5 using? ARM cortex A9
      What is Tegra2 using? ARM cortex A9
      What is Ti, Samsung … using ? ARM cortex A9

      All have announced going to ARM A11

      Where is the competition in the sake of advancement?

      And what happen when everything rely on the ARM ISA? Dont you think ARM billion $ in license fee is only going to skyrocket?

      This is what investment analyst are predicting, As ARM stock PE is 72, Intel is 10…. Indicating that people beleive ARM revenue will go 10 fold in the next few years,.. How does ARM goes from 800 million to 8 billion in revenue? what sell 10x the amount of licenses?? dont be a fool..

      The true competition to ARM going forward is Intel and possibly MIPS (mainly in ‘pirate’ countries).

    • Flatland_Spider
    • 9 years ago

    Who made the BIOS, and does it have a setting to error out if there is not a keyboard attached? 🙂

      • shank15217
      • 9 years ago

      efi my son.. no bios business here

    • Abdulahad
    • 9 years ago

    Are they going to be fan cooled or our fingers melting…
    …and by the time you pick up and say “hello”, battery says bye 🙂
    Intel in phones, they must be joking, and trying hard to look at ARM in the eye.
    May be in 10 years time and by that time, we would have “ARM Inside”… So Intel OUT…SIDE

      • sschaem
      • 9 years ago

      I think the ignorant mass will realize that ARM is not magic and got nothing over the x86 beside a simplified instruction decoder.
      and that part is becoming absolutely insignificant in term of power of estate use… We are not talking about CPU that go in watches anymore…

      I cant wait for Android 4.0 benchmarks and see ARM stock drop to AMD levels.

      • LoneWolf15
      • 9 years ago

      Mr. Madison, what you have just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.

    • Geistbar
    • 9 years ago

    Slightly off topic, but the vicious debate in the other comment thread sparked a question for me- why is it that other relatively comparable technologies, such as MIPS, haven’t been able to compete with ARM? Is it just that they’re so comparable that there’s no point not using the one with established support already, or are their noteworthy failings for the alternatives?

    Intel can sort of barge their way into a market if they try hard enough, and Medfield will be a test of how successful they are at doing that at the moment. It does seem odd to me that other architectures that are more suited for that competition failed to make any real dent though.

      • sschaem
      • 9 years ago

      x86 already got a strong following. MIPS is more for black box design and communist countries.

      Right now ARM is becoming a nasty monopoly as it will soon be in a position where it needs to raise its licensing fee…
      (ARM is not a charity, its a publicly traded company driven only by profit)

      Intel, just from this announcement, is already keeping ARM in check.

      In all honesty I would prefer that all company create a licensing free modular ISA, and we kill all this x86, ARM, mips nonsense.

        • Flatland_Spider
        • 9 years ago

        SPARC is open source, but it’s SPARC.

        OpenSparc
        [url<]http://www.opensparc.net/[/url<] Then there are the OpenCores guys. OpenCores [url<]http://opencores.org/[/url<]

      • Flatland_Spider
      • 9 years ago

      That’s a good question. There are probably a couple of reasons for that. ARM has probably been more aggressive in it’s marketing then MIPS, Power, or SPARC, and they have garnered the most mindshare and thus software because of the marketing. ARM hasn’t lost to x86. The others have, and I think that has tainted people’s perceptions. If ARM loses, everyone will say it’s only suited for embedded purposes like other RISC chips, but ARM is still new at the moment.

      SPARC is pretty antiquated. It uses a sliding window for memory access, so it makes it really hard to ramp up the clockspeed. It scales out to many processors with really well, but those many processors aren’t going to be particularly fast.

    • jdaven
    • 9 years ago

    “Next year, Intel will release Medfield, and we’ll see the first x86 phones…”

    Never going to happen.

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      It’s been stated many a time by Intel’s CEO that those phones will be available in H1/12… that’s much sooner than ‘never’. They’ll probably be shown in CES in January.

        • NeelyCam
        • 9 years ago

        Silly people… downthumbing me isn’t going to stop Intel.

        I must say I was getting a little worried with the lack of downthumbs the past couple of weeks (I guess AMD fanbois were still in come because of the BD disaster). But glad to see that things are back to normal.

        Happy holidays!

          • dpaus
          • 9 years ago

          I’d respond with “…and Peace on Earth, Goodwill toward Men!” but I’d just get downvoted.

          • chuckula
          • 9 years ago

          Oh NeelyCam.. it’s not the AMD fanboys.. [b<]it's the ARM fanbois[/b<]. The AMD fanboys just feel disrespected by Intel and the review sites. Thay ain't got nothing on the ARM fanboys. The ARM fanboys are in the middle of a Jihad for their one true instruction set that is actually several different instruction sets all cobbled together and isn't really much better (if at all) than x86-64 and which they couldn't write a single line of assembler for anyway if their lives depended on it... now that is true fanaticism my friend.

            • dpaus
            • 9 years ago

            Well… I didn’t expect the Spanish Inquisition…

            • LoneWolf15
            • 9 years ago

            No-one does.

            • ImSpartacus
            • 9 years ago

            Well it’s swell that you can feel better than everyone else now that you have it all figured out. Good for you.

      • chuckula
      • 9 years ago

      Obvious jdaven thinks that next year is never going to happen. Which is sort of true, because by the time next year rolls around, it won’t be next year anymore!

        • dpaus
        • 9 years ago

        Aren’t we all forgetting that the world is going to end in 2012?

          • Farting Bob
          • 9 years ago

          Yea but its happening in December, so that gives Intel time to get a few out.

            • dpaus
            • 9 years ago

            If they get them out in late November, no-one will ever know if those battery-life estimates were realistic.

          • DavidC1
          • 9 years ago

          The world ended in 2000 with the Y2K bug.

            • ludi
            • 9 years ago

            It got better…

      • Flatland_Spider
      • 9 years ago

      Intel can write cheques to make sure it does happen. AMD in a phone? That’s probably never going to happen.

        • sschaem
        • 9 years ago

        And as it look, Intel seem to also deliver a better chip then ARM & Apple can do so far (Also none have access to state of the art fab)

        This might be exactly what the Windows8 market is looking for…

        Also dont under estimate Intel in the analog & in general electronic science. (Something I agree, AMD is incapable off)

          • Flatland_Spider
          • 9 years ago

          I agree that Intel can bury people with their fabs and engineers. They are not a competitor to be taken lightly, but it’s too early to tell. Nothing is shipping right now, so I see this as the beginning of the hype.

          All we have is an article, so I’m going to hold off saying the Intel chip is better. It could be better. Intel definitely has a little bit of knowledge about building high performance chips, and some of that tech could have trickled down.

          They also have enough programmers to optimize the Android stack to make sure it runs flawlessly on their chips, and they also have the luxury of making a demo phone where cost is not an obstacle. The smooth web browsing could be from a display with a really high refresh rate or a massive cache in a huge amount of RAM.

    • NeelyCam
    • 9 years ago

    [quote<]Technology Review's hands-on experience doesn't tell us about battery life or cost[/quote<] Actually, the article says: "Intel has tested its reference handset against a handful of the leading phones on sale today. It says these tests show that Medfield offers faster browsing and graphics performance and lower power consumption than the top three, says Smith."

      • poulpy
      • 9 years ago

      It’s a quote from an Intel VP though, not the result of the hands-on experience.

      It’s your run-of-the-mill PR bullshit IMO, nothing more to read into this, but if you do that’s how much info it gives:
      – [i<]"tested against a handful"[/i<]: how many? - [i<]"of leading phones"[/i<]: in what? market share, usability, outright performance? - [i<]"offers faster browsing and graphics performance and lower power consumption"[/i<]: are these characteristics related to each other? E.g. does it out-performs AND consumes less power at the same time (e.g. peak usage) or are they exclusive? - [i<]"than the top three"[/i<]: of their limited amount of handsets selected through their own secret method. Don't get me wrong, some decent competition would ensure ARM doesn't rest on their laurels, even though so far they haven't. Let's see what they can actually do in real life and not through PR bullshit. ps: it would be nice if the swear words censoring would actually keep the correct number of letters, as I didn't use 4 letters profanity 🙂

        • NeelyCam
        • 9 years ago

        Fair point. But lately Intel’s PR machine hasn’t really been lying – the CPUs come out on time and perform as expected.

        If this guy says they have tested the phone, compared it to other ‘leading’ phones and found that battery life is good, I think I’ll trust him more than all those who scream “x86 can never match ARM in efficiency – it can’t be done – it’s impossible”

        That, and I trust Intel’s process to give them the upper hand.

          • poulpy
          • 9 years ago

          [quote<]lately Intel's PR machine hasn't really been lying - the CPUs come out on time and perform as expected[/quote<] Well when things go according to plan it is the only time the PR department doesn't have to distort the reality field and lie through their teeth. So yeah their PR has been decent but that's because the R&D delivered, not the other way around. They have for them the process advantage, ARM on the other hand has years of experience and success in that market. I hope Intel tries for real and this isn't a half baked push, like some believed that same process advantage, and deep pockets, would help them to wipe the floor in the GPU area (twice already).

          • jdaven
          • 9 years ago

          “Fair point. But lately Intel’s PR machine hasn’t really been lying…”

          Lol. That’s rich.

          One word – Larrabee

            • tay
            • 9 years ago

            Why did this get a -1. Larrabee was the example that came to mind here as well. Anyway, anyone have power usage numbers for ARM9 based chips vs a Medfield?
            Anyway, I think intel are a great technology company and Americans should be proud instead of hating them for one reason or another.
            We’ll have to wait and see about Medfield.

      • LocalCitizen
      • 9 years ago

      Good to hear the power consumption is even lower than ARM, but Intel could’ve used a smaller battery, thus a lighter weight, in the demo unit. The end result is still shorter run time. The production units could be heavier than the demo, in order to maintain reasonable run time. So, maybe it won’t be better than the ARM competitors.
      In any case, can’t wait for TR’s review.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 9 years ago

        Sounded to me like they were talking about the power usage of the [i<]complete phones[/i<], and that includes everything from screens to software. Only a finished product on the market can be judged.

      • mthguy
      • 9 years ago

      “Review’s hands-on experience”

      intel doing testing and the hands-on review are different things.

    • OneArmedScissor
    • 9 years ago

    I’ll believe it even exists when I see it on a store shelf. And then I’ll start asking questions.

    It’s a given that Intel will try to have a leg up in “speed” and charge a bit of a premium for it. The timing of its release will determine whether or not that matters. If there are A15 quad-core Kindles when it shows up, and that is the reality Intel is now staring down the throat, then the ship will already have sailed.

      • NeelyCam
      • 9 years ago

      Slapping on more cores only helps if software efficiently harnesses the improved parallel computing power. I think what ends up happening is that single-threaded performance will be exceedingly important, just as it is today in PCs, because that’s what gives the user a fast and smooth experience.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 9 years ago

        It doesn’t give you “faster” and “smoother” once those things are no longer perceptible, though. SoCs with flash memory have an easier time with this than the typical laptop, and laptops sure don’t have a hard time with it.

        Newer SoCs will already have a huge clock speed boost. They may not even be functional quad-cores, with all cores active. That’s not important, so long as each part is highly efficient at whatever task it’s there for.

        My point is not that Intel won’t be faster. It’s that the volume war, turning smartphones and tablets into the equivalent of a toaster, may already have started when they may just put their foot in the door with a new premium niche.

        • Flatland_Spider
        • 9 years ago

        Tuning the OS for low latency and UI responsiveness gives the user the fast and smooth experience. BeOS back in the 90s was known for having extremely good responsiveness, and that was because it was designed to be that way. QNX is extremely responsive because it’s designed for low latency.

    • NeelyCam
    • 9 years ago

    Here it comes. ARM monopoly is about to end, which clearly is good news for consumers – more competition is good, right?

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      Competing isn’t just saying, “Me too!” You are quick to jump to a conclusion about something that has been plagued with setbacks for years.

      The “ARM monopoly” isn’t much of an issue when dozens of companies design their own chips. I’ll take that over a duopoly, which is what really causes an industry to stagnate in today’s world.

        • NeelyCam
        • 9 years ago

        The ARM community will still pay the royalties on all the chips that ARM determines single-handedly and with impunity. ARM has raised the royalty [i<]percentage[/i<] on their newer chips compared to others, simply because they could (monopoly is cool like that).. Qualcomm/TI/NVidia/others don't have the option - they have to pay the higher royalties, which they obviously will pass on to the consumers. Now, with Intel offering a competitive solution to OEMs, maybe Qualcomm/TI/NVidia/others can strongARM the british company to stop raising royalties on the licensees.

          • sweatshopking
          • 9 years ago

          i’d like to see mips getting more love. it’s great architecture.

            • NeelyCam
            • 9 years ago

            Yep; MIPS could enter the race, too. ARM’s monopoly days are numbered.

            I find it kind of silly that ARM stock is trading at P/E over 7000…

            [url<]http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=arm.l&ql=1[/url<] That stock is about to crash and burn.

            • NeelyCam
            • 9 years ago

            AMD P/E <4.0
            ARM.L P/E >7000

            How does this make sense in any sense of the word? [b<] Do the investors [i<]really[/i<] think ARM can increase their profits by some 500x?[/b<] I mean, seriously? What in the ARM business model could possibly warrant such a profit growth?? The biggest bubble in tech I've ever seen... Meanwhile, AMD is horribly undervalued, even when compared to Intel's ridiculously low P/E of 10.

          • raddude9
          • 9 years ago

          What is there to pass on to consumers?
          Yes, ARM increased its royaly percentage slightly for some of it’s most advanced chips, but the amount of money they make per chip is miniscule, [b<]less than 5 cents per chip[/b<]: [url<]http://ar-management.tmcnet.com/news/2011/10/26/5885500.htm[/url<] People are really going to hurt if they have to pay an extra couple of cents to get an advanced quad core tablet instead of a dual core. How much money does Intel charge consumers to get an extra few Mhz, or to switch on chip features that were there anyway? This is why ARM is popular, people can make advanced computing machinery without having to fund the Intel profit machine.

            • NeelyCam
            • 9 years ago

            That 5c is the average of [b<]all[/b<] ARM chips. Cell phone chip royalties are higher, and growing.

            • raddude9
            • 9 years ago

            But they’re still in the cents range. And they are not growing, it’s just that advanced chips have a higher royalty level. Paying a little extra and getting lots of extra performance sounds fair to me.

        • chuckula
        • 9 years ago

        [quote<]Competing isn't just saying, "Me too!"[/quote<] Truer words have never been spoken! I'm sure you'll have a long and insightful post about how ARM doesn't stand a chance in the notebook, desktop, and server world.... oh wait I forgot: Any and all positive hype spewed about ARM, including projections of what ARM chips might be able to do in 2015: Automatically true, and all current ARM chips get automatic upgrades to the projected performance of future chips for free. Any potential improvements in x86 based chips: Physically impossible, Atom will *never* perform better than the first model released in 2008.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 9 years ago

          I’m sorry you routinely get so butt hurt by the internets. You might want to check your blood pressure.

          • NeelyCam
          • 9 years ago

          Don’t forget that Atom sucks and Intel graphics and drivers are sh*t forever and ever.

            • cegras
            • 9 years ago

            Still mostly true at this point, especially the former.

        • sschaem
        • 9 years ago

        Stagnates?!? 22nm Trigate, near theoretical peak 256bit DDR3 memory controller on <$300 cpus, 256bit Double Precision SIMD engine, HW based AVC, 256bit single cycle ringbuss betwen cpu/gpu/, etc.. etc…

        Now about the ‘me too’ comment, thats what all those ARM ‘lego’ company are. Take blue print from ARM, and super glue a bunch of module around to make a SoC.
        nVidia, Qualcomm have the benefit to design their own GPU… but other then that nothing really happen at the computing level.

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