Release roundup: Cases, cooling, and solid-state caching

We’re kind of in limbo this week as far as new hardware releases are concerned. The holidays are just behind us, and the Consumer Electronics Show is less than a week away, so most hardware companies seem to be biding their time. Still, we’ve gathered a small handful of announcements from Cooler Master, Crucial, and Thermaltake:

  • Cosmos II – The Ultra Tower. A long time ago, Cooler Master’s Cosmos 1000 enclosure earned our Editor’s Choice award. Now, the company’s Cosmos II “ultra tower” is debuting, and it looks like a worthy successor—not that one would expect any less, considering the $349.99 asking price. It features aluminum, steel, and mesh construction with room for up to 13 hard drives, a 360-mm radiator at the top, and a 240-mm radiator at the bottom (provided you remove the bottom hard-drive cages). There are front-panel fan controls, USB 3.0 connectivity, and dual hard-drive/SSD docks inside two of the 5.25″ bays, as well. Look for this puppy in stores later this month.

  • Crucial Adrenaline cache solution boosts performance of existing hard drives. The new 50GB Adrenaline SSD isn’t marketed as a minimalistic system drive; rather, Crucial bundles it with caching software that, in the company’s words, “combines the customer’s existing hard drive and the solid state cache into a single storage system.” The software is “fully automated, runs in the background, and requires no user management.” The point, I assume, is to cache frequently accessed data in order to improve system performance, all without limiting the system partition’s capacity. Interesting.
  • The new Thermaltake Frio Extreme – the supreme cooler of Frio series. This new universal CPU heatsink from Thermaltake features dual 140-mm fans and can dissipate up to 250W of heat. That says just about all there is to say, I think. The Frio Extreme also features two stacks of 0.4-mm aluminum fins, six copper heat pipes, and a polished copper base. Its fans can spin between 1200 and 1800 RPM, and they connect to the system using four-pin PWM connectors.

That Cooler Master case sure looks impressive. I think we’re going to want to get one in our labs. I don’t know many folks who’d willingly cough up $350 for an enclosure alone, though, especially when Corsair’s already quite extravagant Obsidian Series 800D case retails for $259.99.

Comments closed
    • Jakubgt
    • 8 years ago

    For a $350 case I would expect it to have a removable motherboard tray.

      • flip-mode
      • 8 years ago

      LOL. For $350 that’s just the beginning. Thing better shoot laser beams.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 8 years ago

      Ya, and more than 2 front USB ports, and a built-in card reader, and an integrated water cooling setup. Nothing would get me to spend $350 on a PC case.

        • astrotech66
        • 8 years ago

        I think it has six USB ports on the front.

          • Farting Bob
          • 8 years ago

          2x USB 3 and 4x USB 2. I would have hoped for 6 USB 3 ports at the front on a case that expensive, they are backwards compatible so it wouldnt matter what board you had in there.

            • atryus28
            • 8 years ago

            The connection for USB 3 ports are not the same as USB 2. I just helped someone set their case with USB 3 front ports. Totally different than USB 2. So you wouldn’t be able to use the other ports until you found mobos with more USB3 connectors. Unless you mean something totally different. I have not seen mobos with that many USB 3 connectors/connections.

            • Jambe
            • 8 years ago

            Plenty of cases (e.g. from Lian-Li, Silverstone, and others) have a cable that converts the USB 3.0 internal plug to a 2.0 internal plug; presumably CM would include these with such an expensive case (although maybe not).

            On the other hand, if you’re spending $350 on a case, why wouldn’t you also be buying a modern motherboard? *shrug*

    • Johnny5
    • 8 years ago

    That fan only goes as low as 1200RPM? My Scythe Mugen (which is admittedly overkill for my stock i5 750) spends most of its time at something like 80RPM and 30 Celsius.

      • flip-mode
      • 8 years ago

      80? you mean 800? 80 RPM is a little quicker than one rotation per second. Fans don’t spin that slow.

        • Johnny5
        • 8 years ago

        No, I mean 80. That’s what the reading says, and when I take the case door off I can see it going around not much faster than once a second. I use the Gigabyte Easytune utility that comes with my motherboard and tell it to spin at the minimum 10% when it is less than maybe 50 Celsius.

    • Draphius
    • 8 years ago

    For $350 id buy a caselabs case over that chunk of plastic.

      • End User
      • 8 years ago

      Caselabs does not yet offer USB 3.0 on their I/O Panel. Major fail in a $460 case. Wait. $460?!?

    • Starfalcon
    • 8 years ago

    Yeah that CM case is pretty crazy with how many drives you can stuff in there, I thought I had a lot of drives with 6 of them stuffed in my current case. I would like to see a review of it on TR as it may be the case that makes me think about putting my trusty old Lian-Li PC-70 out to pasture. I just haven’t seen a case yet that really holds as much as it does , and this one pretty well blows it away.

    • LoneWolf15
    • 8 years ago

    What kind of memory does the Crucial SSD use? MLC? Toggle? SLC?

    Very worth knowing if you’re going to use it for caching.

      • Walkintarget
      • 8 years ago

      If its used as intended, it had better be SLC. MLC will wear out a lot faster when used as a cache drive. I am using an Intel 311 series 20GB mSATA SSD on my new rig and researched enough to know you NEED SLC to do this properly.

    • burntham77
    • 8 years ago

    I paid 300 dollars for a nice Silverstone case years ago. But the wiring in it went bad after about two years. Since then I try to steer clear of spending that much on a case. Not only do I worry about the dry Vegas air wearing out electronics, but frankly I am the sort of person who likes to change chases once every couple of years.

    The CM case is nice though.

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      my case is an Aopen Custompc tower case. it was free. it’s off white, and is missing a side panel. it’s from like 1997. it works.

        • LoneWolf15
        • 8 years ago

        Sounds like the HX08. I had one (actually, may still in storage). I ran an all-SCSI setup in that rig for a long time.

        [url<]http://www.pcstats.com/articleview.cfm?articleID=676[/url<]

        • End User
        • 8 years ago

        You use a case? How extravagant. All you really need is your motherboard laid out on cardboard (but not good cardboard – just find some in a random dumpster).

    • Bensam123
    • 8 years ago

    I am more interested in the software they use with the SSD then the SSD itself…

      • lilbuddhaman
      • 8 years ago

      +1 to this, please more details, a review, SOMETHING

      • aceuk
      • 8 years ago

      I wonder if it’s Nvelo’s Dataplex software?

      [url<]http://thessdreview.com/our-reviews/nvelo-dataplex-ssd-caching-software-review-seven-msata-ssds-prove-an-amazing-concept/[/url<]

    • codedivine
    • 8 years ago

    I would like to see the caching SSD go through Geoff’s benchmarking sweatshop!

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