7-series mobos abound at Gigabyte

At a pre-CES press event on Monday, Gigabyte lifted the curtain off its line of 7-series motherboards. The boards are all tailored for Intel’s 22-nm Ivy Bridge processors, with LGA1155 sockets and PCI Express 3.0 connectivity.

The GI.Sniper 3 and pint-sized GI.Sniper M3 crown the lineup. The former is the highest-end model, which Gigabyte says features an integrated Killer NIC 2201 network controller from Qualcomm coupled with a second Gigabit Ethernet chip from Intel. (Yes, the Killer NIC is now a Qualcomm product—the firm acquired Bigfoot Networks about four months ago.) Gigabyte didn’t divulge chipset model numbers, but we suspect both GI.Sniper variants are based on the upcoming Intel Z77 Express. They both have onboard audio from Creative, too.

Down the line are the GA-Z77X-UD5H and GA-Z77X-U35H, which both support two-way SLI and CrossFire configs. They feature onboard mSATA connectors for mini SSDs, as well. The model numbers leave no doubt here—Z77 Express chipsets surely lurk beneath those heatsinks.

Gigabyte has also unveiled the B75M-D3H. Enthusiasts probably won’t find this model particularly interesting, but IT admins might. Gigabyte says this is a business board with remote management features.

Check out the image gallery below for high-resolution versions of the pictures above.

Comments closed
    • LoneWolf15
    • 8 years ago

    The only reason I’d be remotely interested is because I have a spare 80GB Intel 320 mSATA SSD lying around. Not a good enough reason to shell what they’ll want for the board, though.

    I don’t see any compelling reasons to buy a Z77 chipset mainboard if you already have a Z68. Same number of PCIe lanes. Same number of native SATA 3 ports. The list of “same this, that, etc.” goes on. PCIe 3.0 isn’t a big deal, based on current testing, so really, I think Z77 is about as “meh” as X79 has turned out to be. Add to that that Ivy Bridge will work on P67 and Z68, and unless you’re going to do a full build….*shrug*

    Oh, and there’s the new 3D UEFI BIOS, but I kind of wish Gigabyte would take a hint from ASUS, whose interface seems more organized. I like Gigabyte boards better, but ASUS has UEFI nailed. And I hope GB dropped the Realtek NICs for Intel; for the same price, ASUS has.

    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    Too bad there isn’t much for news on the AMD motherboard side. I was kind of hoping to see some sneek peeks into the 1090FX chipset at CES.

    • Mourmain
    • 8 years ago

    Are those liquid electrolyte capacitors I’m seeing on the first two boards (green ones and gold ones, respectively)? What happened to the Ultra Durable principle of solid capacitors only?

    Are some capacities unreachable or very expensive with solid ones?

    EDIT: the first board mentions “High-end audio capacitors” apparently, and those are the ones they refer to, judging by the location.

      • jalex3
      • 8 years ago

      Yep thats them, the make for a better sound. They why they still use then on sound cards.

    • Grigory
    • 8 years ago

    What I really like is that they are using real heatsinks and not some pistol shaped gimmick bs.

      • yogibbear
      • 8 years ago

      What are the orange clippy looking things in the middle of them in the top pic?

        • Grigory
        • 8 years ago

        Good point. The heat sinks are not free of gimmick bs but it’s the right direction. 🙂

          • Noigel
          • 8 years ago

          Hey, give them credit, I don’t see a huge gaudy K-shaped heat sink on that “Killer NIC.”

      • Farting Bob
      • 8 years ago

      To be fair, i loved the loop-the-loop northbridge heatsink from the 775 days. Completely pointless and would get in the way but you have to admire the courage to make something so pointless.

    • Dr_b_
    • 8 years ago

    Along with the peculiarity of the PCI slot, and PS/2 con, add the analogue VGA port. Are many people still working with a panel with a D-SUB RGB connector?

    You can easily get a converter if you have one, why put it on the motherboard? Further is anyone here going to buy one of these boards and not put in a PCI-E discrete grfx card? Gigabyte must have done their homework on this and there must still be huge market for PCI, PS/2 and the analogue VGA – it costs money to put them on the board – but it seems really outdated especially for the target market segment.

    And hopefully those are the production, release heatsinks, enough with fake guns and bullet motifs already. Really hard to take the board seriously when it has a toy gun on it, what are we 12 years old?

    Forge, this has 4 ram slots because it has a dual chan mem ctrlr.

      • tootercomputer
      • 8 years ago

      I cannot tell from the pictures because the box is covering the bottom of each mobo, but I wonder if these boards also have IDE connectors, floppy connectors. I still like PS/2 connectors when I’m setting up a mobo (pre-OS installation), tho USB hardware is now so standardized that even these are no longer necessary.

      I guess that some of these legacy connectors are there so people can connect old hardware if necessary. I actually own a 5.25 floppy drive from my original 1990 PC, I connected it a year or so ago to one of my current systems to find some old files on some 5.25 floppies I still have. Damned if (a) the drive still worked, and (b) the files were still intact.

        • Farting Bob
        • 8 years ago

        20 years on and your data is still intact on a 5.25″ floppy? Thats got to be a record, even high quality floppy discs never lasted more than 4-5 years for me as storage.

      • jalex3
      • 8 years ago

      I myself like a ps2 keyboard port. Not fussed on one pci if its not in the way. But I don’t like vga,

      • Bensam123
      • 8 years ago

      As long as you can convert from DVI to VGA. DVI-D can’t be converted to VGA. I agree though.

      PS/2 ports nee to disappear. They can be replaced by four USB ports to boot. :l

        • ColeLT1
        • 8 years ago

        Im happy they are still putting at least 1 PS/2 port on motherboards. My Das Keyboard S uses both PS/2 and USB ports for full rollover: “Model S allows full n-key rollover with a PS2 adapter, and 6 keys with USB.”

    • Forge
    • 8 years ago

    Back down to four memory slots. We were moving in such a lovely direction, with six, and then eight slots!

    Why do mobo makers hate ram slots so??

      • BestJinjo
      • 8 years ago

      LGA1155 is a dual-channel platform ==> Means you have 4 DIMMs, not 8 like LGA2011. If you want more RAM slots without paying $500 for a CPU, in February, Intel should release 3820 quad-core for $285 on socket LGA2011.

      The extra memory bandwidth by going from a dual- to a quad-channel for current Sandy Bridge platform adds little value for consumer applications:

      [url<]http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/memory/display/lga2011-ddr3_3.html#sect0[/url<] That leaves amount of RAM then as your primary concern? 1 stick of 8GB of DDR3-1600 is now ~ $75: [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231489[/url<] LGA1155: 4x 8GB = 32GB @ $300 vs. LGA2011 8 sticks x 4GB = 32GB @ $160 But LGA2011 motherboards tend cost $100-150 more than LGA1155 motherboards. So unless you need at least 64GB of DDR3 ram on your motherboard, I am not sure what the problem is? The cost difference is pretty much non-existent. As 8GB ram sticks continue to drop in price, even the cost argument will fall in favor of LGA1155 unless you need > 32GB of RAM.

        • Bensam123
        • 8 years ago

        Expandability is your friend. That would be the problem sir. Options are always good.

          • BestJinjo
          • 8 years ago

          Please read my post. I just explained in detail why the expandability is irrelevant. The current cost of an LGA1155 platform and LGA2011 platform with 32GB of RAM is very similar. So unless you happen to need 64GB of RAM or more, there is no tradeoff in terms of cost or amount of RAM.

          If you want to get a system with 16GB of ram now and buy more 16-32GB of RAM in 3-4 years, I hate to tell you but that modern CPU will be pretty slow in comparison by then. So really, the only case to be upset about 4 DIMMs is if you MUST have more than 32GB of RAM today. And honestly, what applications are you running that take advantage of more than 8GB of RAM, nevermind 16….I am curious?

            • Deanjo
            • 8 years ago

            I have some massive and extremely detailed Pro/E models that consume ~ 19 Gig. Any less and you are in swap hell.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            You would get a workstation platform for such projects.

            LGA 2011 is a workstation-class platform, while LGA1155 is a desktop-class platform.

            You would also like to obtain ECC memory, because the last thing that you need to have is memory errors due to random bit-flips.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            Cause you need to fit into this pre-determined niche with more expensive parts in order to do this sort of work?

            Oh god Dean, don’t use your LGA1155 for workstation class work, it’s forbidden! You must spend an extra $500 to upgrade to a more expensive model that offers you nothing you need besides increased ram capacity that you’re looking for on a lower tier model.

            Don’t perpetuate pointless market segmentation or anything Krogoth.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            It is Intel who is segmenting their tiers.

            They have been doing it for years with different Northbridges. The high-end platform (X38, P975, i850) had ECC, while their cheaper platforms lack ECC support and sometimes Intel would axe memory channel. Since Intel has moved the northbridge onto CPU package. They are now doing it with different sockets.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            Just ’cause their doing it Krogoth doesn’t mean you need to fall into their predefined molds or force other people into them.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            Soo… you don’t know anyone who uses a computer that’s 3-4 years old and wants to spruce it up? ><

            You’re so silly, even Windows 7 uses idle memory that’s sitting around to pre-cache and cache non-essential files that are used often. There are also ramdisks and programs that act as auxiliary forms of caching for the OS (or specific areas of your computer). I’m not going to give you a name because I enjoy seeing people like you that are so vehement about something till they find out completely the opposite of it.

            This is completely irrelevant though. You don’t need to have a use for something now when planning for the future, that’s why I listed expandability. Why are people like you so against having more options? They always poopoo on things that they could never use so they seem to think that goes the same for everyone else, even though it’s usually quite subjective.

            Weird, I’m pretty sure I saw a bit in there about registered modules that’s gone now…

            • BestJinjo
            • 8 years ago

            “Why are people like you so against having more options”

            I am not against more options if I don’t have to pay for them for no reason. I don’t want a motherboard with 6 or 8 DIMMs that would cost more more $ if I’ll never need it. 99% of people don’t need more than 32GBs of RAM. If you want more DIMMs, Intel has LGA2011 for you. LGA1155 is a desktop not a workstation platform.

            You are the one complaining that LGA1155 having 4 DIMMs is “going backwards” when Intel’s mainstream non-workstation platforms never had more than 4 DIMMs in the first place. Why should 99% of consumers have to go out and buy $250-300 motherboards just to have extra DIMM slots “just in case” they decide to upgrade to 8 sticks of RAM in 3-4 years? Future proofing is the stupidest strategy. Experienced system builders upgrade frequently, they don’t care to futureproof.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            Not everyone uses the computer they build… Not everyone updates their computer annually… Not everyone only keeps a computer for 1-2 years before ditching it. I know, expandability is silly isn’t it? -_-;

            What happens when you buy a new kit of memory and have to upgrade? What do you do with your old memory if all your slots are full? I’m guessing I’m not the only one that has encountered this problem. I have a computer right now with 8 gigs of memory 2×4 of which I can’t justify buying 4x4s because I would have to toss the 2x4s in the closet as I have no use for them.

            Just because the 2011 has it and the 1155 doesn’t does not mean we need to set our baselines or expectations lower.

            I am a experienced system builder and I don’t fit into your all inclusive statement about them nor do systems I don’t build for myself as they are no longer under my ownership. You should be careful when using absolutes, especially when you’re talking to someone (or some people in this case) who directly contradicts your statement.

      • axeman
      • 8 years ago

      To run more than two dimms per channel I believe you need registered DIMMS.

        • BestJinjo
        • 8 years ago

        That’s not true. You don’t need registered DIMMs to run > 2 channels:

        [url<]http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/memory/display/lga2011-ddr3.html#sect0[/url<]

          • Krogoth
          • 8 years ago

          You realize that the LGA2011 is quad-channel DDR3? Which means that it can only support to DIMM slots with unbuffered memory? (2 slots per channel = 8 slots)

          You need registered memory in order for each memory channel to drive move than two slots. You will find this to be the case in every board that has three and four slots per memory channel (mostly server boards)

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            I would really like to see a source on this. I think you’re using a confirmation bias based on the fact that memory channels in the past have been divisble by two when compared to available dimm slots.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            You don’t understand the difference between registered and unbuffered memory.

            Registered memory has an extra controller chip on DIMM which is meant to reduce the strain on the memory controller and sub-system. That’s why motherboards with a ton of DIMM slots required registered memory. It is also why you can’t find motherboards that have unbuffered memory that have more than two-slots per memory channel. There are too many reliability and stability issues when engineers try to go beyond two DIMM slots per memory channel.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            I understand what registered and ECC types of memory are, as well as FB-DIMMs… I would like a source to where you’re only allowed two unbuffered dimms per channel.

            I did some quick googling before I posted that and couldn’t find anything to match up with what you’re saying. It’s true that servers which have copious amounts of dimm slots usually use registered memory (they’re servers regardless) and it’s true that dimm slots have usually come in multiples of two when compared to memory channels, but I’ve not read nor seen anywhere where memory controllers are specifically limited to two unregistered dimms per channel.

            Up till like last year we didn’t have consumer motherboards that supported more then 16/24 gigs of memory either, EFI fixed that.

            ‘Just cause I said so’ isn’t a source btw.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            It is a practical limitation.

            It becomes more difficult for the memory circuitry and memory controller to drive more than two unbuffered DIMM slots. You already have boards and controllers that force the memory to run at slower speeds if they are running two DIMMs instead of one DIMMs per channel.

            EFI/BIOS have nothing to do with the limitation on memory capacity. It is entirely up to the memory controller in question. The vast majority of customer-grade northbridges were stuck with 32-34bits (4GiB-16GiB) addressing space. It changed a bit once the northbridge moved onto the CPU package. I believe that K8 started with 36bit (64GiB), but moved to 40bit (1TiB) with newer revisions. I couldn’t find anything on Intel’s chips, but I suspect their memory controllers are at 40bit, but could easily be higher.

            • Bensam123
            • 8 years ago

            So… you can’t find a source for this either besides ‘it’s common sense and what they’ve always done’?

            This seems to be an awful lot like product segmentation (now) mixed with bios limitations before EFI.

            Looking at the multi-channel architecture, operating in dual or tripple channel is beside the point of the amount of dimms. It’s entirely possible to operate outside of either mode by simply inserting a odd number of dimms, which suggests how many dimms you have doesn’t even matter besides making memory work in dual/triple/quad channel mode.

            [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-channel_memory_architecture[/url<] The bit difference you mentioned seems to have absolutely no baring on the memory architecture, read the bit on the bottom about ganged and unganged mode.

            • BestJinjo
            • 8 years ago

            That’s incorrect. Any DDR3 memory kit will work hence I linked a review to show regular memory being tested in quad-channel format in the review. SNB-E features four 64-bit DDR3 memory channels. With a single DDR3 DIMM per channel Intel officially supports speeds of up to DDR3-1600, with two DIMMs per channel the max official speed drops to 1333MHz. Just as with previous architectures, installing fewer DIMMs is possible, it simply reduces the peak available memory bandwidth.

            This 16GB (4x4GB) Corsair kit for $90 will give you quad-channel memory on X79 platform. It’s unregistered/unbuffered RAM.

            [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233143[/url<] You guys are confusing X79 platform with professional Xeon workstations that use Registered RAM. Totally different platforms.

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      Cost

      LGA1155 is a desktop-tier platform, like its LGA1156 predecessor.

      LGA2011 is a workstation-tier platform, like its LGA 1366 predecessor.

      If you need tons of memory, chances are that are you running some business-level application which puts you in the direction of LGA2011.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    Maybe we will get our 8 core ivy bridge – E this year…

      • BestJinjo
      • 8 years ago

      No chance. Why would Intel give you faster cores (IVB-E vs. SB-E) and 2 more “free” cores at $999 price level? They’ll upgrade 6-core SB-E with IVB-E, up the clocks and call it a year on LGA2011. 8-core won’t come until Haswell generation.

        • lycium
        • 8 years ago

        Really no chance you think? 🙁 I should probably get the SB-E now then, and hope I can drop and IVB-E when it’s released…

          • BestJinjo
          • 8 years ago

          I think the rumor is that IVB-E will launch in Q3 2012 only (but don’t hold me to it). If you need a the fastest system with a lot of cores now, I think the $600 3930K is the way to go since it overclocks the same as the 3960. If you are going to be waiting for an 8-core Intel CPU, it’s going to be a while. LGA2011 is going to be compatible with IVB-E, but I doubt it’ll be worth upgrading for that alone. And well actually for people who really use all the available cores (i.e., rendering, encoding), the Bulldozer CPU isn’t so bad! Of course if you are gaming or running photoshop, then go with Intel.

          There is always the route of buying their 8-core Xeon line:

          [url<]http://wccftech.com/intel-sandy-bridgeep-e52687w-processor-unveiled-features-8-cores150w-tdp/[/url<]

            • lycium
            • 8 years ago

            i want the SB-E/IVB-E precisely for rendering (hence the memory system and cores), and their AES instructions are important for my compile times too.

            i guess i’ll get the 3930K now, and see what happens later in the year – been rocking the i7 920 for over 3 years now!

    • Spotpuff
    • 8 years ago

    Is there really still demand for PCI slots on enthusiast motherboards these days?

      • geekl33tgamer
      • 8 years ago

      I thought this the other day – I’ve not personally used the PCI slots on my motherboard’s for a good 3+ years easilly. Lots of add-in cards that use PCI are out there tho, so OS support depending going forward, I expect to see it live on for a litle while longer.

      Heck, we are still seeing boards come out with PS/2 connectors on them. I think parallel port’s are finally gone tho…

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        You can see the PS/2 connector on the top and bottom photos in this post, even. They’re hybrids for a single PS/2 device, but the fact they exist at all is a little mind-boggling. O_o

          • MadManOriginal
          • 8 years ago

          PS/2 ports I can understand but FREAKING D-SUB?? WTF, seriously, there is no way at all to rationalize D-sSub ports in 2012, just have the DVI capable of analog output and stop wasting backplate space on D-sub.

          • doradhorror
          • 8 years ago

          Well you’re probably unaware of the limits of USB. If you want NKRO for keyboards, you currently have to use a PS/2 connection.

      • BestJinjo
      • 8 years ago

      Well I have a $100+ sound card that is still PCI. Imho, it blows onboard sound away and I have been reusing it with every new build. I can go out and buy the latest $100-200 Asus sound card with PCIe, but why when I can reuse my PCI version and save $100+ each time I upgrade my mobo?

      I realize I represent a small market but just giving you an example of why PCI might still matter. I’d rather invest that $100 savings into a new videocard, larger sized SSD, etc.

        • ColeLT1
        • 8 years ago

        Same here, still using a Razer AC1, until pci goes away.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 8 years ago

      I would say at least one, at most 2.

      • 5150
      • 8 years ago

      I just put a parallel port PCI card in a computer today. Hated doing it.

        • LoneWolf15
        • 8 years ago

        Parallel port cards come in PCIe x1 flavors. So do serial port cards, etc.

      • Bensam123
      • 8 years ago

      Yes, I still use my original X-Fi I bought years ago. I have no reason or desire to buy something newer till it dies or PCI goes away. I’m sure I’m not the only one.

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      Old high-end audio cards.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This