OCZ demos next-gen Indilinx SSD controller

Although much of the attention at OCZ’s CES showcase was focused on enterprise-oriented SSDs, we do have some news on a more consumer-centric offering. Tucked away in the corner of the company’s suite was the Vertex 4, which will be based on a next-generation Indilinx controller dubbed Everest 2. OCZ wouldn’t give us any specifics on how the chip differs from the Everest controller inside its recently released Octane SSDs. However, we were told that extensive changes have been made to the firmware. Since it owns Indilinx and the Everest controller, OCZ has full control over the firmware source code—a luxury it hasn’t enjoyed when using controllers from other firms.

As you can see, the Vertex 4’s circuit board puts the controller at the center of a ring of NAND chips. OCZ confirmed that this arrangement shortens the length of traces between the memory chips and the controller, although it also said the design could change by the time the Vertex 4 is ready for mass consumption. The drive is expected to be released around June of this year, giving OCZ plenty of time for tweaking.

As it stands, the Vertex 4 looks very fast. OCZ claims the drive will hit 550MB/s with sequential transfers, 105,000 IOps with random reads, and 90,000 IOps with random writes. In the demo we saw, the Vertex 4 achieved over 80,000 random-write IOps in IOMeter. OCZ was quick to point out that this result was achieved using random data—and that the Vertex 3 doesn’t fare nearly as well thanks to the write-compression mojo of its SandForce controller. After that subtle snipe, we were told that OCZ will continue to work closely with SandForce on existing products. There was no mention of upcoming designs based on SandForce silicon, though.

Comments closed
    • Deanjo
    • 8 years ago

    I really wish they would post specs on the data transfer rates for data that cannot be compressed. For my planned use where throughput is king (video editing) SSD’s offer no real advantage so far over a traditional raid 0 mechanical disk array.

      • Chrispy_
      • 8 years ago

      They did:

      [quote<]OCZ was quick to point out that this result was achieved using random data[/quote<] and: [quote<] the [b<]Vertex [i<]3[/i<][/b<] doesn't fare nearly as well thanks to the write-compression mojo of its SandForce controller.[/quote<] C'mon, don't they teach reading comprehension in schools anymore?

        • Deanjo
        • 8 years ago

        Since when did either of your quotes become posted data transfer rates? Last time I checked “doesn’t fare as well” isn’t an industry accepted standard. It apears it is not I that has the “reading comprehension” handicap.

      • Voldenuit
      • 8 years ago

      Of all the major SSD players in the market, only Sandforce relies on data compression. For most of the other major players (Crucial, Samsung, Intel, Indilinx) a SSD would kill any mechanical storage device in nonlinear video editing because of access times as well as throughput. Heck, I still think even a Sandforce SSD would be extremely competitive against mechanical storage for video editing, although I would of course like to see the numbers.

    • Goty
    • 8 years ago

    Interesting placement of the controller. Maybe to help with trace routing, length, etc?

      • ub3r
      • 8 years ago

      Its called ‘Impedance Matching’. High speed traces need to be of equal (or close to) length to avoid reflections.

    • hansmuff
    • 8 years ago

    It’ll be interesting to see if having the firmware source code actually yields benefits for the end-users. Transfer speed isn’t all, particularly not when the OCZ Sandforce SSDs were and still are riddled with problems.

      • eofpi
      • 8 years ago

      Random IOps is rather more relevant than sequential transfer speeds. But yeah, big numbers mean nothing in storage without stability and reliability.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 8 years ago

    First!

      • geekl33tgamer
      • 8 years ago

      Get out more…

      • yogibbear
      • 8 years ago

      Every time you do that a kitten dies. You masochistic bastard.

        • dpaus
        • 8 years ago

        [quote<]You masochistic bastard[/quote<] Um, unless he's a kitten, I assume you meant 'sadistic'

          • wagsbags
          • 8 years ago

          Come for the tech news, stay for the quality conversation.

        • dashbarron
        • 8 years ago

        I always thought that happened when their drives BSOD.

      • Chrispy_
      • 8 years ago

      Can we ban him now please?

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        No. Can we ban you?

          • Chrispy_
          • 8 years ago

          I’m already banned, I’m just cheating.

      • burntham77
      • 8 years ago

      Anytime you think that the internet is a hostile place, just know that it’s your fault. You’re that guy.

      • dmjifn
      • 8 years ago

      +1 for a respectable “trolled responses”-to-“characters typed” ratio! 🙂

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This